Greatest Super Bowl ever was cast in steel


Ben Roethlisberger photo courtesy of the Pittsburgh Steelers

Talk of Fame Network

The Pittsburgh Steelers have won an NFL record six Super Bowls. The best one, according to our latest Talk of Fame Network poll, was the last one.

We asked our listeners and readers to select the greatest Super Bowl ever and offered up six options. Pittsburgh’s 27-23 victory over the Arizona Cardinals in 2009 won comfortably with 27.5 percent of the vote, followed by New England’s 20-17 upset of St. Louis and the Greatest Show on Turf in 2002 with 20.0 percent.

Another St. Louis Super Bowl _ this one a 23-16 victory over the Tennessee Titans in 2000 _ finished third with 17.5 percent of the vote, followed by two New York Giants Super Bowls. The Giants upset the 18-0 Patriots 17-14 in 2008 (15.0 percent of the vote) and the 20-19 victory over the Buffalo Bills in 1991 (10 percent).

Tying the Bills for the sixth spot at 10 percent was first AFL victory, the New York Jets’ 16-7 upset of the Baltimore Colts in 1969. All three of the Talk of Fame Network hosts cast their ballots for that Jets upset. New York was an 18-point underdog but Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath guaranteed a victory leading up to the game and then delivered.

The Arizona-Pittsburgh game that finished first in the poll was a wild affair that included a 100-yard interception return for a touchdown by James Harrison at the close of the first half, a 64-yard touchdown pass from Kurt Warner to Larry Fitzgerald with 2:37 remaining to give the Cardinals a 23-20 lead, then a 78-yard, eight-play drive that won the game in the closing seconds on a six-yard touchdown pass from Ben Roethlisberger to Santonio Holmes on maybe the greatest pass ever thrown in a Super Bowl.

Roethlisberger threaded the needle to a triple-covered Holmes on the right end-zone sideline with his tippy toes barely in bounds — a touchdown pass that stood up to replay.

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6 Comments

  1. Rasputin
    February 7, 2016
    Reply

    A game ruined by the officials, like two other Steelers “wins”, can’t be the best Super Bowl ever.

    • February 7, 2016
      Reply

      Like Rasputin, I feel a little ill will towards the Steelers and their ref-aided “wins” against the Cowboys.

      With that said, I can’t help but wonder how the poll would have differed if the Cowboys had at least been to a Super Bowl in the last twenty years. It seems that the Cowboys in the Super Bowl is a foreign concept, lost and forgotten in ancient NFL history!

      • Rasputin
        February 9, 2016
        Reply

        Not just the Cowboys, but the Seahawks and the Cardinals. One of the refs actually apologized to the Seahawks at their training camp a few years later, admitting he had “kicked” (botched) some calls during the game. The performance of him and frankly his crew that game was so dismal it actually bothered his conscience so much that he felt the need to apologize years later.

  2. Rich
    February 7, 2016
    Reply

    How was that ruined by officials?

  3. Tommy
    February 7, 2016
    Reply

    Sour grapes from Cowboys fans LOL! The Steelers of the 1970’s were by far the greatest football team in the history of the NFL. Read it, Eat it, Live it!

    • Rasputin
      February 9, 2016
      Reply

      Yeah, those 2 four point wins were really convincing, lol. Bailing out Bradshaw with a bogus pass interference call after Swann ran over Benny Barnes’ back and tripped and then a ref literally blocking the Cowboys’ safety to create the hole on Franco Harris’ TD run (about his only good run of the game; Doomsday shut him down) were just because that crew was in awe of Pittsburgh’s greatness as both a team and a city. The Steelers screwing up a kickoff and accidentally onsiding it to Randy White, who couldn’t grip the ball and fumbled because he had a cast on his hand, wasn’t a stroke of incredible luck, but something they had practiced meticulously. Despite all that they still needed TE Jackie Smith to drop a pass when he was wide open in the end zone, but the Steelers used their combined telekinetic powers to cause that, which was why they were too busy to cover Smith.

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