Pereira: How Super Bowl LII could affect replay for 2018


(Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

EDITOR’S NOTE: To access the podcast, just click on the iTunes link and go to “No. 3 Mike Pereira: Super Bowl …

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/talk-of-fame-podcast/id1337217347?mt=2

Super Bowl LII included more than a record number of yards and someone other than Tom Brady hoisting the Lombardi Trophy. It included non-stop play, too, with few penalties and fewer intrusions by Alberto Riveron and the NFL’s officiating department.

In particular, the Corey Clement touchdown catch — which NBC announcers Cris Collinsworth and Al Michaels predicted would be overturned based on previous judgments — stood, and that had us wondering: Is that what we should expect in 2018 from the league office?

“To me,” said FOX rules analyst Mike Pereira, the league’s former head of officiating, on our latest podcast, “it was more a recognition of how they changed about two-thirds of the way through the season. I think that was what has everybody a bit confused. Because in the first two-thirds of the season they probably overturned six calls that they should not have overturned because there wasn’t the clear and obvious evidence to overturn them.

“And probably there was a meeting of some kind. I know that the public sentiment and the abuse that Alberto Riveron (the league’s senior VP of officiating) and Russell Yurk (VP of instant replay and Administration) were taking for making those decisions really led them back to where they should’ve have been in the first place.  And that’s that it has to be 100 percent clear and obvious that the call on the field was wrong. So you look at the play, assuming the call on the field was right, and it should surprise no one when you reverse it to make the call that was basically wrong … and right that wrong.

“(The Clement catch) just wasn’t clear enough. So I said it would stand … and it did … and I do believe that is the new normal … and probably had been the new normal for the last five weeks or so of the regular season and throughout the playoffs.

“So I wasn’t surprised. But I don’t fault Al Michaels and Cris Collinsworth because it’s certainly reasonable to assume, based on the first two-thirds of the season, that they would’ve reversed it.”

Obvious question, then: If we apply that standard to the Dez Bryant non-catch vs. Green Bay in the 2014 playoffs, would it stand as a reception?

“Under my proposal,” said Pereira, “and what I think the rule ought to change to be, then I think Dez Bryant’s catch was a catch. The rule got in trouble because they differentiated between a receiver who is upright and on his feet and a receiver who is going to the ground. Two different rules. And I think that is the mistake.

“To me, you treat them the same way. It’s control, two feet and time. Time is described in the book as turning upfield, taking extra steps, tucking the ball in … and where the rule really started to have problems is when replay started to make decisions as to what is the element of time. Replay can decide control. Replay can decide two feet like the Clement play. But element of time is subjective.”

One more item of interest, particularly to New England fans: According to Pereira, the “Philly Special” that produced a Nick Foles touchdown catch at the end of the first half and was the most memorable play of the Super Bowl should have been called back. Reason? The Eagles didn’t line up properly and should have been penalized.

“I know the league came out and said that it’s a judgment call, which it is.” Pereira said. “The down judge, who was the one that (the play) was on his side of the field … they felt that it was his judgment, and he (receiver Alshon Jeffrey) was close enough. Well, he wasn’t. They lined up wrong.

“Not only that, it’s a trick play. And if you’re going to run a trick-type play, then you have to be lined up properly. You could either have six men on the line, or you could have an ineligible number lined up at the end of the line, which was the case. I know what the league has said, but they would have been a lot more comfortable if they would have called an illegal formation.

“We always use a yard (within the line of scrimmage), maybe a yard-and-a-half. But that’s two. And even a little bit beyond two. It’s kind of one of those that has no effect on the play. I get it. But they didn’t line up properly. And it really should’ve been called.”

iTunes (click #3, Mike Pereira):

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/talk-of-fame-podcast/id1337217347?mt=2

 

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26 Comments

  1. February 13, 2018
    Reply

    sir; I strongly Disagree with your call on the PLAY that Nick Foles scored that TD!; I’ve played HIGH SCHOOL football and WE HAD a play SIMULAR to that one in the ’70’s called ” the MURPHY SPECIAL! ” I was the TE in the slot; and the center hicked the ball to me while the QB was in the other SLOT in motion; as long as their is 6 men on the LINE OF SCRIMMAGE and 2 in the SLOT; it’s a GOOD PLAY and NO ONE has to TELL the REF. nothing!!

    • February 13, 2018
      Reply

      Nobody did. But Pereira was asked a question. And he responded … with what he believes is how it should have been called. I’ll take my chances with Mike when it comes to the rule book.

  2. John Clarke
    February 13, 2018
    Reply

    I don’t think it really matters. Jeffery asked the line ref if he was close enough and he told him he was good. If he wasn’t Jeffery would have moved closer. He asked before Foles had even gotten into formation with the line. Regardless, Jeffery asked and was told he was alright. If he wasn’t he would have moved up before the snap of the ball.

    • February 13, 2018
      Reply

      But he didn’t. Rules are pretty clear, as Pereira points out. It certainly didn’t affect play, but, as Mike points out, he really wasn’t even close. At least two yards off line … probably little more.

      • Rich
        February 13, 2018
        Reply

        Well I guess they need to start hiring refs that actually know what the rules are and frankly no one cares what Pereira believes he’s an analyst and not a very good one at that

        • February 13, 2018
          Reply

          On the contrary, plenty of people care what Mike says … because he knows the rules and interprets them better than anyone out there. Not even close. Always, always interested in his take on games. He’s worked the job. He’s been the head of the league’s officiating dept. And he’s so good at what he does that other networks tried (unsuccessfully) to find their own Mike Pereira.

      • JIM BOB
        February 13, 2018
        Reply

        What you mean, he didn’t? Alshon did check with the line judge, and the line judge OK’d him. That’s all that’s required. If the line judge were to throw the flag for illegal formation AFTER he said Alshon was lined up properly, that would have shown terrible judgement by the official.

      • Anonymous
        February 14, 2018
        Reply

        Check the video. He was not more than two yards off the line. He was one and a half at best which Pereira says is generally accepted as ok. Not to mention that Jeffery asked.

        • February 14, 2018
          Reply

          I saw the video. So did Pereira. That’s why he said what he said. He said it should’ve been called. You say it shouldn’t. OK, you don’t agree with the guy who headed the league’s officiating department for nine years and is the go-to guy for all calls. Can say what you will, and that’s fine. But I’ll take my chances with Mike. Because that’s his job.

      • John Clarke
        February 15, 2018
        Reply

        But it does matter. The player asked the official before Foles even started his acting routine. If the line judge tells you you’re good, you’re good. If he told him he’s not close enough, you move up. You don’t check all the time, but you check when you are off a bit and want the opinion of the ref that would throw the flag. Why isn’t that good enough for you? The actually people officiating the game said it was OK. I agree that he was too far off, and probably would have warranted a flag, but he asked the ref. Had the ref said he wasn’t close enough he just would have moved up.

        • Brian
          February 16, 2018
          Reply

          Well said, John. I’m not sure why he’s struggling so much with the fact that a) it was a judgement call and b) the official indicated to him that he was ok.

  3. […] issue, as Pereira told the Talk of Fame Sports Network podcast, was whether or not wide receiver Alshon Jeffery was close enough to the line of scrimmage […]

  4. February 13, 2018
    Reply

    The NFL assigned what it believes are its best officials to the Super Bowl. There is no perfection in this, as evidenced by all of the legitimate allegations in the past of New England cheating that the league has looked the other way on. This is mostly chatter.

    • February 13, 2018
      Reply

      Yep, no conspiracy here. But a rule is a rule is a rule. Not saying the Patriots got screwed. Just saying that if Pereira believes refs blew the call — and Mike not only worked with these guys but oversaw them — they probably blew the call. Hey, it happens.

      • Brian
        February 14, 2018
        Reply

        MP: “I know the league came out and said that it’s a judgment call, which it is.” If it’s a judgment call and the official was OK with his alignment (clearly he was since Jeffery checked with him before they ran the play) then it wasn’t a penalty that was missed.

        he also said “We always use a yard (within the line of scrimmage), maybe a yard-and-a-half.” Clearly there’s no set distance in the rule so the rule isn’t “pretty clear” as you said previously.

        • February 14, 2018
          Reply

          It’s pretty clear that it’s not two or more yards. Take a look at the still. The guy isn’t close to the LOS. Look, it’s not going to change the outcome, but if someone who headed the league officiating department is willing to challenge his officials — and he worked with most of these guys — then there must be something to it.

          • Brian
            February 14, 2018

            The distance is irrelevant. Anybody who follows the game knows that the outside receiver checks with the official. If he gets the nod, he’s considered on the line. Given all of the conspiracy theorists who claim the Pats get all of the call this might’ve been more of a shot to them to say they don’t get all of the calls as opposed to any “challenge” to the officials.

          • February 14, 2018

            Just have to agree to disagree. Over and out.

          • SJR
            February 14, 2018

            Pereira is wrong that Jeffery was more than two yards of LOS (same goes for you). LOS is closer to 1.5 yard line and jeffery is lined up just inside the 3. So it is closer to 1.5 yards which Pereira said was close enough. If the LOS was one yard line, than NE lined up in the neutral zone. So there was no way Jeffery was more than 2 yards off LOS.

        • February 14, 2018
          Reply

          I will also tell you this: Had that been the Patriots … and Pereira made the same observation … conspiracy theorists would say the league continues to cut them breaks that it doesn’t with other teams and that it’s just another evidence of how they get away with cheating.

  5. […] During a podcast with the Talk of Fame Network, the Fox analyst explained why the touchdown should have been taken off the scoreboard.  […]

  6. Gerry
    February 13, 2018
    Reply

    If the Patriots had run the same play the same way everyone and their brother would be calling them cheaters

  7. Moondog
    February 15, 2018
    Reply

    Pereira is a dope. Jeffery is within the 1.5 yards of the ball that Pereira himself considers the LOS. Anything to create a controversey and all the media publishes it … fake news (lol)

  8. Leon johnson
    February 15, 2018
    Reply

    The man must have lost big time on the game how much money did you lose Mike that’s the only reason why you’re upset your lost money betting on the Patriots dummy just sit back and shut up sore loser next time keep your money in your pocket and keep your mouth shut Brady lover

  9. […] a podcast with the Talk of Fame Network, the Fox analyst explained why the touchdown should have been taken off the […]

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