State Your Case: Al Wistert


Alvin Wistert, Univeristy of Michigan tackle, seen here Sept. 17, 1948. (AP Photo)

Offensive tackle Al Wistert of the Philadelphia Eagles, circa 1940's. Philadelphia Eagles - 1940's File Photos (AP Photo/NFL Photos)

By Clark Judge

Talk of Fame Network

Sometimes it takes the death of a Hall-of-Fame worthy candidate to gain the attention of the Hall’s board of selectors. It happened this year with Ken Stabler, and it should happen next year with Al Wistert.

The former Philadelphia Eagles’ lineman died earlier this month at 95 without ever gaining entry to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and that’s more than a shame.

It’s a disgrace.

It’s not just that he had the credentials for Canton. It’s that he had the credentials for Canton 50 years ago. But for some reason he slipped through the cracks … never to be remembered again … and here’s hoping his passing awakens voters to what they missed.

Let’s start with those credentials.

He was an All Pro in eight of his nine NFL seasons, and think about that for that a minute. In all but one year of his career he was judged as the best at his position, and tell me another NFL star who can make that statement.

A tackle who played offense and defense for 60 minutes, Wistert was the captain of the Eagles’ 1948-49 championship teams and named to their Hall of Fame in 2009. A star at the University of Michigan, he was named to the College Football Hall of Fame, too. And, oh, yeah, he was also named to the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame.

Michigan retired his jersey number. So did the Eagles, and, by now, you should be getting the picture: Al Wistert was more than a very good football player. He was a great one.

He was a ferocious tackler who was the leader of a defense that posted consecutive shutout wins in its 1948 defeat of the Chicago Cardinals (7-0) and 14-0 win over the Los Angeles Rams a year later. But why stop there? In the 1948 championship game that was played in a raging snowstorm Hall-of-Famer Steve Van Buren scored the only touchdown on a short run keyed by the block of his right tackle.

That tackle? Uh-huh, Al Wistert, whose blocking helped Van Buren win four rushing titles.

Hall-of-Fame coach George Allen had such enormous regard for Wistert that in his book, Pro Football’s 100 Greatest Players, he named Wistert as one of the top 10 tackles to play the game. The other nine are in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

“He was best against the run,” Allen wrote, “but he was among the good early pass rushers. He was as fine a blocker as you could want. He didn’t have the size to overpower people, but he was a master of every kind of block. He was skilled, consistent, determined and resourceful. He was very much a high-quality player.”

High-quality? Al Wistert was more than that.

“Al was the greatest offensive tackle I’ve seen or played with,” said former teammate Bosh Pritchard.

So why isn’t he in Canton? Don’t ask me. Talk to the Hall’s senior committee. It put Stabler on the fast track after he died last summer, and it should do it again with Al Wistert to correct an oversight that never should have been committed.

 

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13 Comments

  1. Sports Fan
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame

    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS
    =
    Re: Both articles posted
    Was Al Wistert on that list Rick Gosselin referred to from 2014?
    &
    =
    RE-POST of COMMENT
    March 12, 2016 at 12:47 am
    Talk Of Fame
    Mr. Gosselin
    Mr. Borges
    Mr. Judge
    From when this was written until now,
    How many of these individuals you noted and or named:
    – Are alive?
    – Are Inducted or due Induction?
    – Have been Semi-Finalists/Finalists?
    thank you

  2. Sports Fan
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame

    Re: ALL STATE YOUR CASES on your Website
    &
    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS


    A LIST SHOULD BE MADE OF EVERYONE LIVING
    GET THESE INDIVIDUALS IN WHILE THEY ARE STILL ALIVE
    LEARN FROM THESE INDIVIDUALS
    Dick Stanfel
    Ken Stabler
    Al Wistert
    PUT YOURSELVES IN THESE INDIVIDUALS FAMILY’S SHOES
    DO NOT LET HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF
    AS NOTED ON THIS POST
    “IT’S A DISGRACE”
    INDUCT THEM WHILE THEY ARE STILL ALIVE

  3. bachslunch
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    Clark, thank you for this excellent, well researched article. Agreed, Al Wistert was a top-flight player who should have been in the HoF ages ago. Being a six time 1st team all pro and two time 2nd team all pro plus being on the 40s all decade team should get a player on the fast track in, but for some unfathomable reason he never even got before the committee. He is also tied for the top score over at Ken Crippen’s film study site at 8.0 with Lavvie Dilweg and Johnny Robinson. Hopefully he gets his due someday.

    • March 15, 2016
      Reply

      I’ll be honest with you: I didn’t know much about him until his name was brought to us not that long ago. But the more you read about the guy … the more you know … the harder it becomes to understand why he’s not in the Hall. He’s one of those guys who fell through the cracks, then got lost. And he’s not alone. Hopefully, his passing will awaken voters to the great player that he was. Thanks for the note.

  4. Paul
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    Perhaps the PFHOF needs to create a memorial category for its elections, or change the existing seniors category to memorial, if PFHOF voters continue to ignore deserving candidates until after they pass on. There are many deserving senior candidates now in their 70s and 80s that were skipped over for the memorial selections of Stabler and Stanfel (previous 2x rejected HOF finalist) and now are the voters going to move to select Wistert with a major deciding factor that he recently died? Why was he not elected years ago? No disrespect intended to them or their families, but focus should be on getting deserving candidates elected while they are still alive.

  5. Sam Goldenberg
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    Clark: Excellent job as always. Got to tell you, I was not familiar with Wistert until your article. His credentials are solid, no doubt. As you and I have discussed there are so many good senior candidates and only 1 (or 2) a year can be recognized. I think the process needs to be revamped. Maybe a one time year where 5-10 excellent senior candidates are inducted. It is also a shame that these guys are inducted after they pass away. Paul’s idea of a memorial selection is very good. I think it is so much better if the player can enjoy the honor while alive. Seems like Stanfel got in because he passed.

  6. Rich Quodomine
    March 15, 2016
    Reply

    I think Paul nailed it, and maybe the line of demarcation is the Super Bowl era. Anything before is “Memorial Era”, after is “Senior”. As to how that would change voting or who gets in when, that’s up to the HoF.

  7. Sports Fan
    April 1, 2016
    Reply

    March 15, 2016 at 12:55 am
    Talk Of Fame

    Re: ALL STATE YOUR CASES on your Website
    &
    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS


    A LIST SHOULD BE MADE OF EVERYONE LIVING
    GET THESE INDIVIDUALS IN WHILE THEY ARE STILL ALIVE
    LEARN FROM THESE INDIVIDUALS
    Dick Stanfel
    Ken Stabler
    Al Wistert
    PUT YOURSELVES IN THESE INDIVIDUALS FAMILY’S SHOES
    DO NOT LET HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF
    AS NOTED ON THIS POST
    “IT’S A DISGRACE”
    INDUCT THEM WHILE THEY ARE STILL ALIVE

  8. Sports Fan
    April 1, 2016
    Reply

    A PAST ARTICLE ALONG WITH THIS ONE:

    Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Forgotten in the Crush of Statistics

    By Rick Gosselin

    Talk of Fame Network

    One of the issues I have with the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection process is that not enough worthy candidates are cycled through the room for discussion.

    I tell players you’re not a Hall of Fame candidate until you become a finalist — and there are only 15 of those every year. That’s the only time the full committee of 46 selectors gathers to discuss players worthy of Canton. If you’re never a finalist, you’re never a candidate.

    Thus, some very worthy candidates have fallen through the cracks. There are 71 position players eligible for enshrinement who were NFL all-decade selections but do not yet have busts in Canton. Sixty-one of that 71 have never even been discussed as finalists. It should be noted that the all-decade teams are chosen by the Hall of Fame selection committee.

    It seems to me if a player is recognized as one of the best at his position during his generation, he deserves some discussion from that same committee as to where he fits in the all-time pecking order. It doesn’t necessarily mean he belongs in Canton — but he does deserve his 10 minutes of discussion from the full committee.

    Of the 61 who have never been discussed, 56 are now in the senior pool. That means their 25 years of eligibility has expired. The senior sub-committee is allowed to nominate only two candidates per year. At that rate, it would take the next 28 years just to clear the queue of those all-decade performers. So most of these players and their chances at Canton have been lost forever.

    Let me give you two examples of players who, sadly, fell through the cracks — wide receivers Gary Collins and Boyd Dowler.

    Both were NFL all-decade selections for the 1960s. Dowler, in fact, was one of six wideouts chosen to the NFL’s 50th anniversary team (also selected by the Hall of Fame selection committee). He’s the only one of the six without a bust in Canton. In fact, he’s the only one of the six never discussed as a finalist. Collins has never been discussed as a finalist, either.

    Dowler played 12 seasons, Collins 10. Dowler played in six NFL title games and has five championship rings. Collins played in four NFL title games and has one championship ring. He set a NFL playoff record that day with three TD catches. Collins also was one of the NFL’s elite punters during that era, leading the league with an average of 46.7 yards per kick in 1965. It took 27 years before another NFL punter could average that many yards per kick. Dowler also punted on Green Bay’s championship teams of 1961-62.

    Collins scored 70 touchdowns in his 331 career catches. When he retired after the 1971 season, only four receivers in NFL history had more TD catches. He averaged a touchdown every 4.7 catches. Jerry Rice, the greatest touchdown-maker of all, averaged a TD every 7.9 catches.

    Collins never led the NFL in receiving and never had a 1,000-yard season but it was a different time, a different era then. When he retired, NFL offenses were throwing the ball an average of 24 times per game. Now they are throwing it 35 times per game. There are more games and more opportunities now for catches, yards and touchdowns as well. In Collins’ final season, there was one 1,000-yard receiver in the NFL. Last season there were 24.

    Collins averaged 16 yards per catch. Dowler averaged 15.3 yards. Dowler never led the league in receiving, either, nor did he have a 1,000-yard season. Their lack of statistics will make it difficult for either to be recognized in Canton because the parade into the room of the 1,000-catch receivers has already begun.

    Both Collins and Dowler deserved to be discussed as Hall of Fame candidates at some point during the last four decades. The selection process failed them.

    And that’s a shame.

    =
    =
    =
    QUESTIONS:
    March 15, 2016 at 12:35 am
    Talk Of Fame

    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS
    =
    Re: Both articles posted
    Was Al Wistert on that list Rick Gosselin referred to from 2014?

    & ALSO RE: BOTH ARTICLES
    =
    RE-POST of COMMENT
    April 1, 2016 at 12:23 pm
    March 28, 2016 at 1:21 pm
    March 24, 2016 at 1:44 am
    March 19, 2016 at 8:10 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:27 am
    March 12, 2016 at 12:47 am
    Talk Of Fame
    Mr. Gosselin
    Mr. Borges
    Mr. Judge
    From when this was written 2014 until now,
    regarding the large number of persons noted in this article
    How many of these individuals you noted here and or named here in this article:
    – Are alive?
    – Are Inducted or due Induction?
    – Have been Semi-Finalists/Finalists?
    thank you

  9. Sports Fan
    April 11, 2016
    Reply

    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    A PAST ARTICLE ALONG WITH THIS ONE:

    Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Forgotten in the Crush of Statistics

    By Rick Gosselin

    Talk of Fame Network

    One of the issues I have with the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection process is that not enough worthy candidates are cycled through the room for discussion.

    I tell players you’re not a Hall of Fame candidate until you become a finalist — and there are only 15 of those every year. That’s the only time the full committee of 46 selectors gathers to discuss players worthy of Canton. If you’re never a finalist, you’re never a candidate.

    Thus, some very worthy candidates have fallen through the cracks. There are 71 position players eligible for enshrinement who were NFL all-decade selections but do not yet have busts in Canton. Sixty-one of that 71 have never even been discussed as finalists. It should be noted that the all-decade teams are chosen by the Hall of Fame selection committee.

    It seems to me if a player is recognized as one of the best at his position during his generation, he deserves some discussion from that same committee as to where he fits in the all-time pecking order. It doesn’t necessarily mean he belongs in Canton — but he does deserve his 10 minutes of discussion from the full committee.

    Of the 61 who have never been discussed, 56 are now in the senior pool. That means their 25 years of eligibility has expired. The senior sub-committee is allowed to nominate only two candidates per year. At that rate, it would take the next 28 years just to clear the queue of those all-decade performers. So most of these players and their chances at Canton have been lost forever.

    Let me give you two examples of players who, sadly, fell through the cracks — wide receivers Gary Collins and Boyd Dowler.

    Both were NFL all-decade selections for the 1960s. Dowler, in fact, was one of six wideouts chosen to the NFL’s 50th anniversary team (also selected by the Hall of Fame selection committee). He’s the only one of the six without a bust in Canton. In fact, he’s the only one of the six never discussed as a finalist. Collins has never been discussed as a finalist, either.

    Dowler played 12 seasons, Collins 10. Dowler played in six NFL title games and has five championship rings. Collins played in four NFL title games and has one championship ring. He set a NFL playoff record that day with three TD catches. Collins also was one of the NFL’s elite punters during that era, leading the league with an average of 46.7 yards per kick in 1965. It took 27 years before another NFL punter could average that many yards per kick. Dowler also punted on Green Bay’s championship teams of 1961-62.

    Collins scored 70 touchdowns in his 331 career catches. When he retired after the 1971 season, only four receivers in NFL history had more TD catches. He averaged a touchdown every 4.7 catches. Jerry Rice, the greatest touchdown-maker of all, averaged a TD every 7.9 catches.

    Collins never led the NFL in receiving and never had a 1,000-yard season but it was a different time, a different era then. When he retired, NFL offenses were throwing the ball an average of 24 times per game. Now they are throwing it 35 times per game. There are more games and more opportunities now for catches, yards and touchdowns as well. In Collins’ final season, there was one 1,000-yard receiver in the NFL. Last season there were 24.

    Collins averaged 16 yards per catch. Dowler averaged 15.3 yards. Dowler never led the league in receiving, either, nor did he have a 1,000-yard season. Their lack of statistics will make it difficult for either to be recognized in Canton because the parade into the room of the 1,000-catch receivers has already begun.

    Both Collins and Dowler deserved to be discussed as Hall of Fame candidates at some point during the last four decades. The selection process failed them.

    And that’s a shame.
    =
    =
    =
    QUESTIONS:
    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:35 am
    Talk Of Fame

    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS
    =
    Re: Both articles posted
    Was Al Wistert on that list Rick Gosselin referred to from 2014?

    & ALSO RE: BOTH ARTICLES
    =
    RE-POST of COMMENT
    April 11, 2016 at 10:19 am
    April 1, 2016 at 12:23 pm
    March 28, 2016 at 1:21 pm
    March 24, 2016 at 1:44 am
    March 19, 2016 at 8:10 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:27 am
    March 12, 2016 at 12:47 am
    Talk Of Fame
    Mr. Gosselin
    Mr. Borges
    Mr. Judge
    From when this was written 2014 until now,
    regarding the large number of persons noted in this article
    How many of these individuals you noted here and or named here in this article:
    – Are alive?
    – Are Inducted or due Induction?
    – Have been Semi-Finalists/Finalists?
    thank you

  10. Sports Fan
    July 14, 2016
    Reply

    April 11, 2016 at 10:23 am
    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    A PAST ARTICLE ALONG WITH THIS ONE:

    Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Forgotten in the Crush of Statistics

    By Rick Gosselin

    Talk of Fame Network

    One of the issues I have with the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection process is that not enough worthy candidates are cycled through the room for discussion.

    I tell players you’re not a Hall of Fame candidate until you become a finalist — and there are only 15 of those every year. That’s the only time the full committee of 46 selectors gathers to discuss players worthy of Canton. If you’re never a finalist, you’re never a candidate.

    Thus, some very worthy candidates have fallen through the cracks. There are 71 position players eligible for enshrinement who were NFL all-decade selections but do not yet have busts in Canton. Sixty-one of that 71 have never even been discussed as finalists. It should be noted that the all-decade teams are chosen by the Hall of Fame selection committee.

    It seems to me if a player is recognized as one of the best at his position during his generation, he deserves some discussion from that same committee as to where he fits in the all-time pecking order. It doesn’t necessarily mean he belongs in Canton — but he does deserve his 10 minutes of discussion from the full committee.

    Of the 61 who have never been discussed, 56 are now in the senior pool. That means their 25 years of eligibility has expired. The senior sub-committee is allowed to nominate only two candidates per year. At that rate, it would take the next 28 years just to clear the queue of those all-decade performers. So most of these players and their chances at Canton have been lost forever.

    Let me give you two examples of players who, sadly, fell through the cracks — wide receivers Gary Collins and Boyd Dowler.

    Both were NFL all-decade selections for the 1960s. Dowler, in fact, was one of six wideouts chosen to the NFL’s 50th anniversary team (also selected by the Hall of Fame selection committee). He’s the only one of the six without a bust in Canton. In fact, he’s the only one of the six never discussed as a finalist. Collins has never been discussed as a finalist, either.

    Dowler played 12 seasons, Collins 10. Dowler played in six NFL title games and has five championship rings. Collins played in four NFL title games and has one championship ring. He set a NFL playoff record that day with three TD catches. Collins also was one of the NFL’s elite punters during that era, leading the league with an average of 46.7 yards per kick in 1965. It took 27 years before another NFL punter could average that many yards per kick. Dowler also punted on Green Bay’s championship teams of 1961-62.

    Collins scored 70 touchdowns in his 331 career catches. When he retired after the 1971 season, only four receivers in NFL history had more TD catches. He averaged a touchdown every 4.7 catches. Jerry Rice, the greatest touchdown-maker of all, averaged a TD every 7.9 catches.

    Collins never led the NFL in receiving and never had a 1,000-yard season but it was a different time, a different era then. When he retired, NFL offenses were throwing the ball an average of 24 times per game. Now they are throwing it 35 times per game. There are more games and more opportunities now for catches, yards and touchdowns as well. In Collins’ final season, there was one 1,000-yard receiver in the NFL. Last season there were 24.

    Collins averaged 16 yards per catch. Dowler averaged 15.3 yards. Dowler never led the league in receiving, either, nor did he have a 1,000-yard season. Their lack of statistics will make it difficult for either to be recognized in Canton because the parade into the room of the 1,000-catch receivers has already begun.

    Both Collins and Dowler deserved to be discussed as Hall of Fame candidates at some point during the last four decades. The selection process failed them.

    And that’s a shame.
    =
    =
    =
    QUESTIONS:
    April 11, 2016 at 10:23 am
    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:35 am
    Talk Of Fame

    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS
    =
    Re: Both articles posted
    Was Al Wistert on that list Rick Gosselin referred to from 2014?

    & ALSO RE: BOTH ARTICLES
    =

    RE-POST of COMMENT
    July 14, 2016 at 12:47 am
    April 11, 2016 at 10:19 am
    April 1, 2016 at 12:23 pm
    March 28, 2016 at 1:21 pm
    March 24, 2016 at 1:44 am
    March 19, 2016 at 8:10 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:27 am
    March 12, 2016 at 12:47 am
    Talk Of Fame
    Mr. Gosselin
    Mr. Borges
    Mr. Judge
    From when this was written 2014 until now,
    regarding the large number of persons noted in this article
    How many of these individuals you noted here and or named here in this article:
    – Are alive?
    – Are Inducted or due Induction?
    – Have been Semi-Finalists/Finalists?
    thank you

  11. Sports Fan
    July 19, 2016
    Reply

    July 14, 2016 at 12:57 am
    April 11, 2016 at 10:23 am
    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    A PAST ARTICLE ALONG WITH THIS ONE:

    Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Forgotten in the Crush of Statistics

    By Rick Gosselin

    Talk of Fame Network

    One of the issues I have with the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection process is that not enough worthy candidates are cycled through the room for discussion.

    I tell players you’re not a Hall of Fame candidate until you become a finalist — and there are only 15 of those every year. That’s the only time the full committee of 46 selectors gathers to discuss players worthy of Canton. If you’re never a finalist, you’re never a candidate.

    Thus, some very worthy candidates have fallen through the cracks. There are 71 position players eligible for enshrinement who were NFL all-decade selections but do not yet have busts in Canton. Sixty-one of that 71 have never even been discussed as finalists. It should be noted that the all-decade teams are chosen by the Hall of Fame selection committee.

    It seems to me if a player is recognized as one of the best at his position during his generation, he deserves some discussion from that same committee as to where he fits in the all-time pecking order. It doesn’t necessarily mean he belongs in Canton — but he does deserve his 10 minutes of discussion from the full committee.

    Of the 61 who have never been discussed, 56 are now in the senior pool. That means their 25 years of eligibility has expired. The senior sub-committee is allowed to nominate only two candidates per year. At that rate, it would take the next 28 years just to clear the queue of those all-decade performers. So most of these players and their chances at Canton have been lost forever.

    Let me give you two examples of players who, sadly, fell through the cracks — wide receivers Gary Collins and Boyd Dowler.

    Both were NFL all-decade selections for the 1960s. Dowler, in fact, was one of six wideouts chosen to the NFL’s 50th anniversary team (also selected by the Hall of Fame selection committee). He’s the only one of the six without a bust in Canton. In fact, he’s the only one of the six never discussed as a finalist. Collins has never been discussed as a finalist, either.

    Dowler played 12 seasons, Collins 10. Dowler played in six NFL title games and has five championship rings. Collins played in four NFL title games and has one championship ring. He set a NFL playoff record that day with three TD catches. Collins also was one of the NFL’s elite punters during that era, leading the league with an average of 46.7 yards per kick in 1965. It took 27 years before another NFL punter could average that many yards per kick. Dowler also punted on Green Bay’s championship teams of 1961-62.

    Collins scored 70 touchdowns in his 331 career catches. When he retired after the 1971 season, only four receivers in NFL history had more TD catches. He averaged a touchdown every 4.7 catches. Jerry Rice, the greatest touchdown-maker of all, averaged a TD every 7.9 catches.

    Collins never led the NFL in receiving and never had a 1,000-yard season but it was a different time, a different era then. When he retired, NFL offenses were throwing the ball an average of 24 times per game. Now they are throwing it 35 times per game. There are more games and more opportunities now for catches, yards and touchdowns as well. In Collins’ final season, there was one 1,000-yard receiver in the NFL. Last season there were 24.

    Collins averaged 16 yards per catch. Dowler averaged 15.3 yards. Dowler never led the league in receiving, either, nor did he have a 1,000-yard season. Their lack of statistics will make it difficult for either to be recognized in Canton because the parade into the room of the 1,000-catch receivers has already begun.

    Both Collins and Dowler deserved to be discussed as Hall of Fame candidates at some point during the last four decades. The selection process failed them.

    And that’s a shame.
    =
    =
    =
    QUESTIONS:
    July 14, 2016 at 12:57 am
    April 11, 2016 at 10:23 am
    April 1, 2016 at 3:40 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:35 am
    Talk Of Fame

    Re: Posted by Clark Judge on March 15, 2016 at 12:11 am
    STATE YOUR CASE: AL WISTERT
    &
    Re: Posted by Rick Gosselin on July 14, 2014 at 12:01 am
    FORGOTTEN IN THE CRUSH OF STATISTICS
    =
    Re: Both articles posted
    Was Al Wistert on that list Rick Gosselin referred to from 2014?

    & ALSO RE: BOTH ARTICLES
    =

    RE-POST of COMMENT
    July 19, 2016 at 1:19 am
    July 14, 2016 at 12:47 am
    April 11, 2016 at 10:19 am
    April 1, 2016 at 12:23 pm
    March 28, 2016 at 1:21 pm
    March 24, 2016 at 1:44 am
    March 19, 2016 at 8:10 pm
    March 15, 2016 at 12:27 am
    March 12, 2016 at 12:47 am
    Talk Of Fame
    Mr. Gosselin
    Mr. Borges
    Mr. Judge
    RE: “One of the issues…is that not enough worthy candidates are cycled through the room for discussion.”

    RE: “most of these players and their chances at Canton have been lost forever.”

    RE: “The selection process failed them…And that’s a shame.”

    From the time this was written in 2014 until now,
    regarding the large number of persons noted in this article
    How many of these individuals you noted and or named here in this article:
    – Are alive?
    – Have been Inducted since this was written or are now pending Induction?
    – Have been a Semi-Finalist / Finalist?
    – What is being done to correct this serious oversight?
    thank you

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