State Your Case: Tom Flores


Photo courtesy of the Seattle Seahawks
(Photo courtesy of Seattle Seahawks)

Talk of Fame Network

by Ron Borges

Some have claimed a critical question of any Hall of Famer is “Can you write the history of pro football without him?” In the case of Tom Flores you cannot, yet he has never come close to Hall-of-Fame consideration.

Flores was the first Hispanic starting quarterback in pro football history, the first Hispanic head coach to win a Super Bowl (which he did twice) and the first Hispanic to serve as a club president and general manager. Much has been made about Charles Haley’s five Super Bowl rings and rightly so. But what of Flores, who has four Super Bowl rings and an AFL championship ring?

In fact, Flores and Mike Ditka are the only men in NFL history to have won Super Bowl championships as a player, assistant coach and head coach. Other than that, what have you done, Tom Flores?

Well, how about being the fifth-leading passer in American Football League history and one of only 20 players to have played in the full 10 years of the AFL’s existence? Known as “The Iceman” when quietly running his teams, Flores set a record with 11 touchdown passes in a two-game span that stood for 51 years, before Ben Roethlisberger broke it in 2014 with 12.

After backing up Len Dawson on the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs team that defeated Minnesota in Super Bowl IV to even the AFL’s record at 2-2 against the older NFL, Flores retired and became an assistant coach — first in Buffalo and then Oakland, where he served as quarterback coach of their Super Bowl XI championship team.

He replaced Hall-of-Fame head coach John Madden in 1979 and a year later took the Raiders back to the Super Bowl, becoming the first coach to win the Lombardi Trophy with a wild-card playoff entry. Flores led the Raiders to four road victories that year and three years later proved it was no fluke when he coached the 1983 Los Angeles Raiders to victory in Super Bowl XVIII.

Four years later, Flores moved into the Raiders’ front office for a season, then left for Seattle, where he became the first Hispanic to serve as club president and general manager of an NFL team. After several years of struggle, he came out of retirement to coach the Seahawks. It was a disastrous decision.

Seattle went 14-34 in three seasons before he was fired, retiring from coaching with an overall record of 105-90, including an 8-3 playoff record. His playoff winning percentage of .727 ranks second all-time behind Vince Lombardi and his 83 victories with the Raiders are second only to Madden’s 103.

Only Chuck Noll, Bill Belichick, Bill Walsh and Joe Gibbs have more Super Bowl victories than Tom Flores, a groundbreaker as a player and a coach. He has been eligible to have his credentials debated for 20 years but has yet to ever be discussed.

Only three coaches — Flores, Jimmy Johnson and George Seifert — have won two Super Bowls without reaching the Hall of Fame, with Johnson a finalist this year. Perhaps if he can break through, there may one day be a place in Canton for someone who did more than win championships. Tom Flores opened doors for Hispanic players and coaches and, along the way, won championships in every job he ever held: player, assistant and head coach.

Shouldn’t that be enough to have your credentials debated a time or two among the Hall’s 46 voters?

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136 Comments

  1. February 17, 2015
    Reply

    DUMBFOUNDED! That’s the first thing that comes to my mind when I see that Tom Flores has failed to be inducted to the NFL’s Hall of Fame. Is it because Hispanics appear to be exponentially growing into the most dominate ethnicity group in the country? This should be good news! Hispanic spending power has become the most significant economic phenomenon in US history!
    NFL owners and their failure to actively woo Latinos to fill their respective stadiums is also one of today’s greatest mysteries. Obviously the fan demographic is changing dramatically, and (regardless of how the immigration problem is dealt with by the Congress) the majority of NFL fans could very well become Latino. Why they have failed to do a dramatic outreach effort to this segment of America baffles the (profit-making) mindset.
    One of the most important factors to drawing fans to a stadium is have on their team that iconic football player who becomes an instant hero, like Jim Brown, Tony Dorsett, Barry Sanders, Bo Jackson, and Reggie Bush and, yes, even O.J. Simpson. Stars of this caliber obviously have attracted African American fans once the NFL decided to hire black players. Hispanics have not been so lucky, with a relatively few recognizable players to choose from. Although we (speaking of the Latino community) have had some great Hispanic players, with guys like Joe Kapp, Jim Plunkett and Tom Fears, how many regular fans knew they were even Hispanic? Things are picking up with the likes of Jeff Garcia, Tony Romo and (now) Mark Sanchez, a former USC quarterback who could potentially become an NFL star. But, the few Latino professional football players we have (had) in the league basically have the same problem that Latino actors have faced for over a century: Ignored!
    But the NFL could change all of that, if they would only showcase one of those living icons already among its ranks. The NFL community and its base of fans have had a professional Latino football hero for almost the last 50 years: Tom Flores!
    Tom Flores is not only a Latino professional football player legend who should be inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame, his credentials surpass many players already inducted. Tom Flores has impacted professional football like few players ever. His Latino statistics are glowing; he, the first quarterback to play professional football and also the first Hispanic coach.
    Many folks question and still debate whether the first Hispanic to coach a professional football team was Tom Fears or Tom Flores. It has been stated by various entities (and your recent article as well) that Tom Fears was the first Hispanic named to coach an NFL team when he was hired by the expansion New Orleans Saints on January 27, 1967.
    However, although Tom Fears had a stellar career in professional football, and has been inducted to the National Football Hall of Fame, Fears was actually born in Guadalajara, Mexico, to an Anglo father and a Mexican mother. Fears was the son of an American mining engineer who had married a Mexican woman in Guadalajara, and then moved with his family to Los Angeles at the age of six. Therefore, to be more accurate as to who can claim that title (and not appear to be splitting ethnic hairs), Tom Flores, who was born to both Mexican parents in Sanger, California, a man who has lived the Mexican American experience, deserves that honor!
    To most football fans, who is or who is not the first Hispanic to coach a professional football team is an insignificant statistic. But to the emerging Hispanic community, whose football fan base is growing much larger every year, whatever honors of achievements the few Latinos in football can claim, means a lot to this burgeoning group of American citizens. Tom Flores is – to many Mexican Americans – a living football legend that has inspired many Latinos to excel in that sport, among other professional endeavors! While many who vote for players to be inducted into the National Foot Ball Leagues Hall of Fame may not recognize Flores’ accomplishments, as being sufficient to qualify for that honor, he has played with, coached, and inspired many players and coaches who are now in the Hall of Fame, including Fred Biletnikoff, Willie Brown, Dave Casper, Mike Haynes, Ted Hendricks, Howie Long, Jim Otto, Art Shell and Gene Upshaw. Although Jim Plunkett has not been inducted (yet), all of pro football acknowledges that Tom Flores was responsible for resuscitating Plunkett’s career, who was the Super Bowl MVP in 1984.
    Flores achievements are monumental, to say the least. He graduated from the University of the Pacific in 1958, but was unable to find a job in professional football. He was cut by the Calgary Stampeders of the CFL in 1958, and then by the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL) in 1959. In 1960 Flores finally landed a position as a quarterback with the American Football League’s Oakland Raiders, who began play in 1960 as a charter member of the league. Flores became the first Hispanic quarterback in American professional football. He became the Raiders’ starting quarterback early in the 1960 season.
    Flores (who can claim four Super Bowl rings) had his most productive season in 1966. Although he completed only 49.3 percent of his attempts, he passed for 2,638 yards and 24 touchdowns in 14 games. Oakland traded him to the Buffalo Bills in 1967. After serving primarily as a backup, he was released by the Bills and in 1969 signed with the Kansas City Chiefs, where he was back up to Len Dawson on the Chiefs’ World Championship team, where he earned his first Super Bowl ring. He retired as a player after the 1970 season. He was one of only twenty players who were with the AFL for its entire ten-year existence. He is the fifth-leading all-time passer in the AFL.
    After stints as an assistant coach in Buffalo and Oakland (where he won his 2nd Super Bowl XI ring as an Assistant Coach under John Madden), Flores became the Raiders’ head coach in 1979, following John Madden’s retirement. Flores then became the NFL’s first minority (and Mexican American) head coach to win a Super Bowl, winning his third and fourth Super Bowl rings for Super Bowl XV and Super Bowl XVIII.
    After a 5-10 finish to the 1987 season, Flores moved to the Raiders’ front office, but left after just one year to become the president and general manager of the Seattle Seahawks. He returned to coaching as the Seahawks head coach in 1992, but returned to the front office following three disappointing seasons. Flores resigned from the Seahawks in 1994 following Paul Allen’s purchase of the Seahawks. Flores left Pro Football with a lifetime coaching record of 97-87 (52.7%), as well as an 8-3 playoff record, and with two Super Bowl victories. Flores, Jimmy Johnson, and George Seifert are the only eligible coaches with two such victories, who have not been selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame
    Tom Flores has distinguished himself in so many ways in the pro football arena as a player, assistant coach, head coach, President and General Manager of an NFL Football team, and now as a commentator for the Oakland Raiders football team along with Greg Papa on KSFO (560 AM) during the radio broadcasts of Raiders games. Tom Flores is also active with many charities throughout the country including the Boy Scouts of America’s (Los Angeles District) Tom Flores Celebrity Golf Tournament, and the Tom Flores Youth Foundation, which provides scholarships to students attending his high school. In honor of his many accomplishments in football and to the community, his home town high school in Sanger, California, has named its football stadium the “Tom Flores Stadium” in his honor.
    Maybe there are many other football players and coaches who have garnered more wins as a quarterback, or as an assistant coach or as a head coach, but very few professional football players and coaches (as well as fans) who have worked with Tom Flores among his many capacities in football or with numerous civic communities, can never say he isn’t deserving to be inducted into the NFL’s Hall of Fame! If that were to happen, watch the size of audiences in NFL cities throughout America become a little browner, many of them who would be proud to say that they finally have one of their own in the NFL Hall of Fame!

    • February 18, 2015
      Reply

      Very well said, and all true Joe.. Yes, there is a big fan base for Mexican/Americans that follow the NFL.. Most of the articles I read say Tom should be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.. Just those few short years when Tom coached in Seattle, it brought down his regular season winning record, but the rings should make that ALL void!.. Mexican/Americans are eager to see one of their own excel in sports, especially the NFL.. I remember back in the 80’s in baseball (LA Dodgers) Fernandomania (Fernando Velenzuela) Imagine having a Fernando in football??.. Tom Flores has been shafted by the NFL in more ways than one..

    • February 18, 2015
      Reply

      Tom Flores Belongs In The Hall of Fame

      — January 26, 2012 by The Chancellor of Football

      11
      Tom Flores with his team before player introductions in the L.A. Coliseum
      When you think of the short list of coaches in NFL History that have won multiple Super Bowls, who comes to mind?? Of course you think of Vince Lombardi, Don Shula, Tom Landry, Chuck Noll, Bill Walsh, or even Bill Parcells and Bill Belichick. Throw in Joe Gibbs and his three rings. Do you realize that there is only one eligible coach that has won multiple Super Bowls that is NOT in the Pro Football Hall of Fame??

      Think about it a second, we’re talking about a coach with as many victories as six eligible Hall of Fame coaches and you don’t consider Tom Flores great?? Only Vince Lombardi and Bill Walsh can best Flores (9 & 10 to 12 yrs) in shortest coaching careers who achieved 2 Super Bowl victories. Landry, and Shula coached 29 and 33 years respectively to achieve the same number of championships.

      Tom Flores and Jim Plunkett showing off Super Bowl rings.

      For some it’s the fact that his winning percentage of .527 isn’t that high. However Bill Parcells is almost a shoo-in finalist this year with a winning percentage of .570. http://www.pro-football-reference.com/coaches/ParcBi0.htm Also, before his stint as Seahawks head coach, he left the Los Angeles Raiders with a winning percentage of .610 which is better than Bill Walsh at .609. Something to think about.

      After following in the footsteps of another Hall of Fame coach in John Madden, some mistakenly think Flores won with Madden’s guys. Which isn’t close to being true. In today’s market of free agency we’re used to a lot of movement, yet between winning Super Bowl XI (Madden’s team) and Super Bowl XV only WR Cliff Branch and Mark Van Eeghen remained of the skill positions. WR Fred Biletnikoff, QB Ken Stabler, and RB Clarence Davis were all gone. Ken Stabler was traded to the Houston Oilers. He won with (at the time draft bust) Jim Plunkett at quarterback who was with his 3rd team. Stop and think about that.. That’s the equivalent of the Colts trading away Peyton Manning and bringing in Matt Leinhart and winning the Super Bowl.

      Furthermore 9 of the 11 starters on defense for Super Bowl XI were gone by Super Bowl XV. Jack Tatum, Willie Brown, Monte Johnson, all gone with the holdovers being John Matuszak andTed Hendricks. He won Super Bowl XV with a quarterback the world had forgotten about. A little known RB in Kenny King and 14 new players in only his second season as a head coach?? Might be the single greatest coaching performance in NFL history.

      Tom Flores and Al Davis receiving the Vince Lombardi Trophy following Super Bowl XVIII

      Although winning it all in 1980 was the crowning jewel of a season, his triumph in 1983 should have catapulted him to legendary status. It was his ’83 Raiders that stopped the defending champion Washington Redskins and MVP Joe Theismann dead in their tracks. The ’83 Redskins were the highest scoring team in NFL history and going into Super Bowl XVIII, pundits were hailing them as the best team ever. Yet in a dominant performance the Raiders ushered in the era of the Super Bowl blowout winning 38-9. After that game we had the string of 13 consecutive NFC Super Bowl winners. Yet if you looked at the era from 1980-1996, ONLY Tom Flores won a Super Bowl for the AFC side of the ledger and he did it twice. How is that for impact??

      Yet why is he constantly overlooked for his coaching performance when it comes to greatness?? Is it because of the shadow cast by former owner Al Davis?? Even in the NFL Films Super Bowl XVIII video, they lauded Raider assistant Charlie Sumner for the defensive play that put the Redskins hopelessly behind. The Jack Squirek interception for a touchdown to make it 21-3 at the half. Why didnt they give Flores the credit for that move??

      Logic tells us that a part of it could be the fact that he’s Hispanic and the sporting press doesn’t view him in the same light as fellow coaches. We hope to be wrong in this assessment yet it’s the ONLY discernible difference between he and every other coach listed above. Tom Flores, for his career had 97 wins, 87 losses and was 8-3 in the postseason. He had the AFC’s best record (12-4) also in 1985 with MVP Marcus Allen but they were upset in the playoffs by the Patriots. To some, those aren’t great numbers but neither were Joe Namath’s 173 TDs and 220 interceptions and he’s in.

      It’s about impact and contribution to the game. Being the only AFC coach to win a Super Bowl in a 17 year period qualifies for impact. Another interesting fact; Of the first 20 Super Bowl winners, his 1980 Oakland Raiders are the ONLY team that doesn’t have a skill player in the Hall of Fame. Cliff Branch being in there is another argument for another time. Again we call that one of the greatest coaching performance in NFL history. It’s time to give Tom Flores the credit and distinction he deserves.

      For induction into the Hall of Fame, I present Tom Flores

      Thanks for reading and share the article.

    • May 22, 2017
      Reply

      Because it’s a racsim towards Hispanics or native indian jim plunkett and Tom Flores that’s why u well ever see a Hispanic in the HOF because it’s make up of 80% whites 20%blacks so do the math. Makes a lot of Hispanics upset

      • May 22, 2017
        Reply

        Unfortunately, too much today is reduced to a racial narrative, and that’s unfortunate. Flores’ Hispanic background actually HELPS his case among voters because it makes him a social pioneer … as well as a successful NFL coach. What hurts him is career in Seattle, which nobody talks about outside of that room. He was 14-34 and finished last in the division each season. I know. It happens. George Seifert won two Super Bowls and isn’t in Canton. Jimmy Johnson won two, too. And he’s not there. Mike Shanahan won two, and he’s not in the Hall of Fame. Like Flores, all failed at their last stops … and that resonates with voters. Flores had a .527 winning percentage; Seifert’s was .648 and he had eight straight years of 10 or more wins, including five of 12 or more and three of 14 or more. Yet he’s not in. Reason: Carolina, with his last season 1-15. Is that fair? I don’t know. All I know is that there is no push for someone who won six division titles in eight years in San Francisco. But it was Carolina that damaged his case. Likewise, it was Flores’ failure in Seattle that hurts him. There are people in that room pushing for him, and maybe he gets in one day. But, like Seifert, he is not on a short list. Not now, anyway. And to me, what hurts him more than anything is that candidates are categorized … as coaches … or players … or GMs. Tom Flores was a successful coach AND a player. Just like Dan Reeves. But Reeves isn’t in, and that’s wrong. Should be. Flores has four Super Bowl rings … one as a player, one as assistant coach and two as a head coach. Think he should be judged … as others should … on his complete NFL history. But when the Hall admitted Dick LeBeau, for instance, it judged him only as a former player. Not as one of the best defensive coaches out there. That was not part of the conversation. It was only as a former player. And I don’t get that. If someone is a significant contributor to the league for, say, 40-50 years in a variety of roles — player, coach, staff, I don’t care — let’s hear the entire argument.

  2. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    Mr. Borges, thank you very much for State Your Case!

    Coach Tom Flores HALL OF FAME

    A Sports Writer recently noted:
    “Tom Flores: The least known and least appreciated multiple Super Bowl-winning coach.”

    A certain Sports Writer has “always said the Professional Football Hall of Fame is for people that you can’t write the history of the Professional Football without them”

    . . .if true, then let us carefully reconsider Coach Tom Flores in that same category!

    Sent: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 9:37 am

    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2015 – 113 Nominees

    15 Finalists announced

    Only 3 Head Coaches were among the 15

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off:

    Thomas Raymond “Tom” Flores
    Professional Football Coach and Player – NFL / AFL

    35 Years in Professional Football – Since 1959

    21 Years Sports Analyst/Broadcaster – Since 1994

    28 Years Eligible for Induction into the Professional Football Hall of Fame – Since 1987

    FIRST: Person to have rings as a
    Player (Kansas City Chiefs),
    Assistant Coach
    and
    Head Coach (Raiders)
    (the only other Player/Coach to equal this is Mike Ditka, they are the only 2 to do this)

    FIRST: Only Person to have rings as a
    Player (Kansas City Chiefs, 2 Rings),
    Assistant Coach (Raiders, 1 Ring)
    and
    Head Coach (Raiders, 2 Rings)
    (No Player/Coach has accomplished this in the history of the league)

    Won Championships
    – Player
    – Assistant Coach
    – Head Coach

    5 Rings:
    – 1 AFL Championship – Player
    – 4 Super Bowls:
    Super Bowl IV Chiefs – Player
    and
    Super Bowl XI – Assistant Coach
    and
    Super Bowl XV – Head Coach
    and
    Super Bowl XVIII – Head Coach

    FIRST: Hispanic starting NFL Quarterback

    FIRST: Hispanic Professional Football Quarterback to win a Championship

    FIRST: Hispanic Professional Football Quarterback to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Assistant Coach in Professional Football History to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach in Professional Football History to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only Head Coach in Professional Football History to win two Super Bowls

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only General Manager in Professional Football History

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only Team President in Professional Football History

    Consider all the great Coaches past and present:
    FIRST: Coach to win a Super Bowl as a Wild-Card Team

    FIRST: Super Bowl Highest winning percentage 1.000 no losses

    FIRST: 1973 to Present Highest Playoff winning percentage overall other Coaches, he’s Number 1

    FIRST: The Professional Football Hall of Fame recognizes him among the first “Hispanic Assistant Coaches”

    FIRST: The Professional Football Hall of Fame recognizes him among the first “Hispanic Head Coaches”

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Assistant Coach of the Oakland Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Oakland Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Los Angeles Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Seattle Seahawks

    SECOND: Coaches in the modern era only Vince Lombardi has a higher playoff winning percentage he’s Number 2

    THIRD: Coaches in the modern era only Vince Lombardi and Weeb Ewbank (AFL/NFL) have a higher playoff winning percentage he’s Number 3

    Out of 473 Pro Football Coaches:
    51 have Coached in the Super Bowl
    23 have Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl
    19 out of the 23 that Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl have won at least 1 Super Bowl
    13 out of the 23 that Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl have won at least 2 Super Bowls

    Only 4:
    Chuck Noll – Hall of Fame
    Bill Belichick
    Bill Walsh – Hall of Fame
    Joe Gibbs – Hall of Fame
    have more Super Bowl wins

    THIRD: Ranked number 3 on the All-Time Head Coach Super Bowl wins list

    SECOND: 83 wins Second-Most in Raider franchise history

    Has more total wins then Hall of Fame Coach Bill Walsh and Hall of Fame Finalist Coach Jimmy Johnson

    Super Bowl XV – Head Coach: His team was the underdog and prevailed against the odds

    Super Bowl XVIII – Head Coach: His team was again the underdog and prevailed against the odds
    Coaching win over Hall of Fame Coach Joe Gibbs (often described in sports circles as a “genius”) his only Super Bowl defeat

    Coached Raiders 9 seasons won 2 Super Bowls

    Hall of Fame Coach John Madden Coached Raiders 10 seasons won 1 Super Bowl

    Coach Flores was his Assistant Coach and Head Coach for the Only 3 Super Bowls in Raider history

    Coach Flores Raiders’ winning percentage .610 Season and .727 Playoffs
    Hall of Fame Coach Bill Walsh 49er’s winning percentage .609 Season and .714 Playoffs

    1982 – NFL-AFC: COACH OF THE YEAR

    2003 – MULTI-ETHNIC SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2007 – CALIFORNIA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2011 – ROBERTO CLEMENTE AWARD

    2012 – BAY AREA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2012 – NFLPA COLLEGIATE BOWL COACH

    FIRST: Hispanic Pro-Bowl Quarterback

    FIRST: Quarterback in Raider Franchise History

    1 of only 20 players who were in the AFL for its entire ten-year existence

    FIRST: 52 year old Record – With the game on the line, the Only QB in Professional Football history to throw 6 TD passes in game with 4th Quarter Comeback & Game Winning Drive. Matt Flynn tied it in 2011, making them both the Only QBs in Professional Football History the record still stands

    FIRST & SECOND: 51 year old Record – Most TD’s thrown in 2 back to back games 11. Tom Brady tied it 2007, Ben Roethlisberger passed it 2014 – 12. Record stood for 51 years.

    FIFTH: Leading Passer All-Time AFL

    Consider all of the odds/obstacles for his success/achievements

    Consider the odds to become a Coach in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Playoff game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Championship game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Super Bowl game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in 2 Super Bowl games in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach and win a Super Bowl game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach and win 2 Super Bowl games in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to accomplish all of this as a Head Coach in Pro Football

    … yet he is not in the Professional Football Hall of Fame

    (if any of this is incorrect let me know?
    Or any insight why he’s been overlooked because clearly if
    “the Professional Football Hall of Fame is for people that you can’t write the history of the Professional Football without them”
    then they have repeatedly written it for 28 years without Coach Tom Flores)

    SF

    —–

    Sent: Thu, Sep 30, 2010 7:14 pm

    (1976: Coach John Madden won his Super Bowl, retired in 1978 after a 9 – 7 season. Coach Flores was an Assistant to Coach Madden’s Super Bowl win)

    Head Coach Tom Flores 2 Super Bowl Wins –

    1980:
    AFC Wild Card Game:

    Houston Oilers: 2nd AFC Central
    Coach “Bum” Phillips: Hall of Fame Candidate legendary Coach
    Earl Campbell: Hall of Fame Running Back
    Best Career Season 1980
    NFL Rushing Leader
    All-Pro selection
    Pro Bowl selection
    NEA NFL MVP
    NFL Offensive Player of the Year
    They held Houston to 7 points

    AFC Divisional Game:

    Cleveland Browns: 1st AFC Central
    Coach Sam Rutigliano: Consecutive UPI NFL 2x Coach of the Year 1980/1979
    Brian Sipe: Quarterback
    Best Career Season 1980
    NFL MVP
    PFWA MVP
    UPI AFL-AFC Offensive Player of the Year
    AFC Leader Touchdown Passes

    AFC Championship Game:

    San Diego Charges: 1st AFC West
    Coach Don Coryell: 2x Hall of Fame Finalist 2015 & 2010
    Coach Joe Gibbs: Offensive Coordinator – Hall of Fame – 3x Super Bowl Champion
    Dan Fouts: Quarterback – Hall of Fame
    NFL Passing Yard Leader
    AFC Leader Touchdown Passes
    First team NFL history 3 Receivers over 1,000 receiving yards
    John Jefferson: 1st NFL Leader Receiving Yards (1,340)
    Kellen Winslow: 2nd NFL Receiving Yards (1,290) – Hall of Fame
    Charlie Joiner: 4th NFL Receiving Yards (1,132)
    One of the top Offenses in NFL history

    Super Bowl:

    Philadelphia Eages: NFC Champion – 1st NFC East
    Coach Dick Vermeil: Hall of Fame Candidate
    Sid Gillman: Consultant, listed as QB Coach – Legendary Hall of Fame Coach whose Coaching Tree/Forest has 25 Super Bowl wins and numerous NCAA Championships
    Ron Jaworski: Quarterback

    Raiders 27 to 10

    =
    =

    1983:
    AFC Divisional Game

    Pittsburgh Steelers: 1st AFC Central
    Coach Chuck Noll: Hall of Fame Coach 4x Super Bowl Champion
    Tony Dungy: Coaching Staff – Hall of Fame Finalist 2x 2015 and 2014

    AFC Championship Game:

    Seattle Seahawks: 2nd AFC West
    Coach Chuck Knox: Hall of Fame Candidate
    Coach Knox was fresh off of beating Dan Reeves/John Elway and Don Shula/Dan Marino

    Super Bowl:

    Washington Redskins: NFC Champion – 1st NFC East – Defending Super Bowl Champions

    Coach Joe Gibbs: Hall of Fame – 4 Super Bowls & 3x Super Bowl Champion
    Coach Gibbs was fresh off of beating John Robinson/Eric Dickerson and Bill Walsh/Joe Montana
    Washington had highest scoring team, most prolific offense, largest statistical advantages in National Football history!
    They held this powerful Washington offense to 9 points!

    Raiders 38 to 9
    =
    =
    =
    =

    I have nothing against the 3 Coaches they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving:
    Don Coryell
    Jimmy Johnson
    Tony Dungy

    But they left off Coach Tom Flores

    Important:
    Re: Four (4) specific Coaches to consider but with No biases & previous hearsay which could be inaccurate.

    Start each one with a completely clean slate regarding any hearsay

    There are some numbers noted below but please take the total and complete individual person into account take Everything into account leave no stone unturned. For example take into consideration the Era they Coached in, Rule changes, salary cap, free agency to name a few

    Hall of Fame Induction:

    1. Who is most deserving and why and in what order are each most deserving?

    2. Is each one deserving, if not, who is not deserving?

    3. If all or some or one of them are not deserving, could you make an argument for them and if no, why?

    Elaborate as much as you’d like

    Four (4) Coaches listed in order of their eligibility:

    Don Coryell eligible 28 to 29 years – No Super Bowl appearances – Playoff winning pct. .333

    Tom Flores eligible 27 to 28 years – 2 Super Bowl appearances 2 wins – Playoff winning pct. .727

    Jimmy Johnson eligible 16 years – 2 Super Bowl appearances 2 wins – Playoff winning pct. .692

    Tony Dungy eligible for 2 years – 1 Super Bowl appearance 1 win – Playoff winning pct. .474

    Super Bowl Wins:

    Flores 2
    Johnson 2
    Dungy 1
    Coryell 0

    HOF’s:
    Landry 2
    Parcells 2
    Shula 2
    Ewbank 1
    Stram 1
    Madden 1
    Allen 0
    Grant 0
    Levy 0

    Playoffs Winning Percentage:

    Flores .727
    Johnson .692
    Dungy .474
    Coryell .333

    Team Best Reg. Season Percentage:

    Dungy .759
    Flores .610
    Coryell .607
    Johnson .563

    Team Best Reg. Season Wins:

    Dungy 85
    Flores 83
    Coryell 69
    Johnson 44

    Team Best Total Wins:

    Dungy 92
    Flores 91
    Coryell 72
    Johnson 51

    Team Best Season Games over .500

    Dungy 58
    Flores 30
    Coryell 13
    Johnson 8


    (if any of this is incorrect let me know?
    Or any insight why he’s been overlooked? Thank you)

    SF

  3. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    Mr. Borges, thank you very much for State Your Case!

    Coach Tom Flores HALL OF FAME

    A Sports Writer recently noted:
    “Tom Flores: The least known and least appreciated multiple Super Bowl-winning coach.”

    A certain Sports Writer has “always said the Professional Football Hall of Fame is for people that you can’t write the history of the Professional Football without them”

    . . .if true, then let us carefully reconsider Coach Tom Flores in that same category!

    Sent: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 9:37 am

    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2015 – 113 Nominees

    15 Finalists announced

    Only 3 Head Coaches were among the 15

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off:

    Thomas Raymond “Tom” Flores
    Professional Football Coach and Player – NFL / AFL

    35 Years in Professional Football – Since 1959

    21 Years Sports Analyst/Broadcaster – Since 1994

    28 Years Eligible for Induction into the Professional Football Hall of Fame – Since 1987

    FIRST: Person to have rings as a
    Player (Kansas City Chiefs),
    Assistant Coach
    and
    Head Coach (Raiders)
    (the only other Player/Coach to equal this is Mike Ditka, they are the only 2 to do this)

    FIRST: Only Person to have rings as a
    Player (Kansas City Chiefs, 2 Rings),
    Assistant Coach (Raiders, 1 Ring)
    and
    Head Coach (Raiders, 2 Rings)
    (No Player/Coach has accomplished this in the history of the league)

    Won Championships
    – Player
    – Assistant Coach
    – Head Coach

    5 Rings:
    – 1 AFL Championship – Player
    – 4 Super Bowls:
    Super Bowl IV Chiefs – Player
    and
    Super Bowl XI – Assistant Coach
    and
    Super Bowl XV – Head Coach
    and
    Super Bowl XVIII – Head Coach

    FIRST: Hispanic starting NFL Quarterback

    FIRST: Hispanic Professional Football Quarterback to win a Championship

    FIRST: Hispanic Professional Football Quarterback to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Assistant Coach in Professional Football History to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach in Professional Football History to win a Super Bowl

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only Head Coach in Professional Football History to win two Super Bowls

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only General Manager in Professional Football History

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority and Only Team President in Professional Football History

    Consider all the great Coaches past and present:
    FIRST: Coach to win a Super Bowl as a Wild-Card Team

    FIRST: Super Bowl Highest winning percentage 1.000 no losses

    FIRST: 1973 to Present Highest Playoff winning percentage overall other Coaches, he’s Number 1

    FIRST: The Professional Football Hall of Fame recognizes him among the first “Hispanic Assistant Coaches”

    FIRST: The Professional Football Hall of Fame recognizes him among the first “Hispanic Head Coaches”

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Assistant Coach of the Oakland Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Oakland Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Los Angeles Raiders

    FIRST: Hispanic and Minority Head Coach of the Seattle Seahawks

    SECOND: Coaches in the modern era only Vince Lombardi has a higher playoff winning percentage he’s Number 2

    THIRD: Coaches in the modern era only Vince Lombardi and Weeb Ewbank (AFL/NFL) have a higher playoff winning percentage he’s Number 3

    Out of 473 Pro Football Coaches:
    51 have Coached in the Super Bowl
    23 have Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl
    19 out of the 23 that Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl have won at least 1 Super Bowl
    13 out of the 23 that Coached in more than 1 Super Bowl have won at least 2 Super Bowls

    Only 4:
    Chuck Noll – Hall of Fame
    Bill Belichick
    Bill Walsh – Hall of Fame
    Joe Gibbs – Hall of Fame
    have more Super Bowl wins

    THIRD: Ranked number 3 on the All-Time Head Coach Super Bowl wins list

    SECOND: 83 wins Second-Most in Raider franchise history

    Has more total wins then Hall of Fame Coach Bill Walsh and Hall of Fame Finalist Coach Jimmy Johnson

    Super Bowl XV – Head Coach: His team was the underdog and prevailed against the odds

    Super Bowl XVIII – Head Coach: His team was again the underdog and prevailed against the odds
    Coaching win over Hall of Fame Coach Joe Gibbs (often described in sports circles as a “genius”) his only Super Bowl defeat

    Coached Raiders 9 seasons won 2 Super Bowls

    Hall of Fame Coach John Madden Coached Raiders 10 seasons won 1 Super Bowl

    Coach Flores was his Assistant Coach and Head Coach for the Only 3 Super Bowls in Raider history

    Coach Flores Raiders’ winning percentage .610 Season and .727 Playoffs
    Hall of Fame Coach Bill Walsh 49er’s winning percentage .609 Season and .714 Playoffs

    1982 – NFL-AFC: COACH OF THE YEAR

    2003 – MULTI-ETHNIC SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2007 – CALIFORNIA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2011 – ROBERTO CLEMENTE AWARD

    2012 – BAY AREA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2012 – NFLPA COLLEGIATE BOWL COACH

    FIRST: Hispanic Pro-Bowl Quarterback

    FIRST: Quarterback in Raider Franchise History

    1 of only 20 players who were in the AFL for its entire ten-year existence

    FIRST: 52 year old Record – With the game on the line, the Only QB in Professional Football history to throw 6 TD passes in game with 4th Quarter Comeback & Game Winning Drive. Matt Flynn tied it in 2011, making them both the Only QBs in Professional Football History the record still stands

    FIRST & SECOND: 51 year old Record – Most TD’s thrown in 2 back to back games 11. Tom Brady tied it 2007, Ben Roethlisberger passed it 2014 – 12. Record stood for 51 years.

    FIFTH: Leading Passer All-Time AFL

    Consider all of the odds/obstacles for his success/achievements

    Consider the odds to become a Coach in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Playoff game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Championship game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in a Super Bowl game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach in 2 Super Bowl games in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach and win a Super Bowl game in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to Coach and win 2 Super Bowl games in Pro Football

    Consider the odds to accomplish all of this as a Head Coach in Pro Football

    … yet he is not in the Professional Football Hall of Fame

    (if any of this is incorrect let me know?
    Or any insight why he’s been overlooked because clearly if
    “the Professional Football Hall of Fame is for people that you can’t write the history of the Professional Football without them”
    then they have repeatedly written it for 28 years without Coach Tom Flores)

    SF

    —–

    Sent: Thu, Sep 30, 2010 7:14 pm

    (1976: Coach John Madden won his Super Bowl, retired in 1978 after a 9 – 7 season. Coach Flores was an Assistant to Coach Madden’s Super Bowl win)

    Head Coach Tom Flores 2 Super Bowl Wins –

    1980:
    AFC Wild Card Game:

    Houston Oilers: 2nd AFC Central
    Coach “Bum” Phillips: Hall of Fame Candidate legendary Coach
    Earl Campbell: Hall of Fame Running Back
    Best Career Season 1980
    NFL Rushing Leader
    All-Pro selection
    Pro Bowl selection
    NEA NFL MVP
    NFL Offensive Player of the Year
    They held Houston to 7 points

    AFC Divisional Game:
    Cleveland Browns: 1st AFC Central
    Coach Sam Rutigliano: Consecutive UPI NFL 2x Coach of the Year 1980/1979
    Brian Sipe: Quarterback
    Best Career Season 1980
    NFL MVP
    PFWA MVP
    UPI AFL-AFC Offensive Player of the Year
    AFC Leader Touchdown Passes

    AFC Championship Game:
    San Diego Charges: 1st AFC West
    Coach Don Coryell: 2x Hall of Fame Finalist 2015 & 2010
    Coach Joe Gibbs: Offensive Coordinator – Hall of Fame – 3x Super Bowl Champion
    Dan Fouts: Quarterback – Hall of Fame
    NFL Passing Yard Leader
    AFC Leader Touchdown Passes
    First team NFL history 3 Receivers over 1,000 receiving yards
    John Jefferson: 1st NFL Leader Receiving Yards (1,340)
    Kellen Winslow: 2nd NFL Receiving Yards (1,290) – Hall of Fame
    Charlie Joiner: 4th NFL Receiving Yards (1,132)
    One of the top Offenses in NFL history

    Super Bowl:
    Philadelphia Eages: NFC Champion – 1st NFC East
    Coach Dick Vermeil: Hall of Fame Candidate
    Sid Gillman: Consultant, listed as QB Coach – Legendary Hall of Fame Coach whose Coaching Tree/Forest has 25 Super Bowl wins and numerous NCAA Championships
    Ron Jaworski: Quarterback
    Raiders 27 to 10
    =
    =
    1983:
    AFC Divisional Game
    Pittsburgh Steelers: 1st AFC Central
    Coach Chuck Noll: Hall of Fame Coach 4x Super Bowl Champion
    Tony Dungy: Coaching Staff – Hall of Fame Finalist 2x 2015 and 2014

    AFC Championship Game:
    Seattle Seahawks: 2nd AFC West
    Coach Chuck Knox: Hall of Fame Candidate
    Coach Knox was fresh off of beating Dan Reeves/John Elway and Don Shula/Dan Marino

    Super Bowl:
    Washington Redskins: NFC Champion – 1st NFC East – Defending Super Bowl Champions
    Coach Joe Gibbs: Hall of Fame – 4 Super Bowls & 3x Super Bowl Champion
    Coach Gibbs was fresh off of beating John Robinson/Eric Dickerson and Bill Walsh/Joe Montana
    Washington had highest scoring team, most prolific offense, largest statistical advantages in National Football history!
    They held this powerful Washington offense to 9 points!
    Raiders 38 to 9
    =
    =
    =
    =
    I have nothing against the 3 Coaches they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving:
    Don Coryell
    Jimmy Johnson
    Tony Dungy

    But they left off Coach Tom Flores

    Important:
    Re: Four (4) specific Coaches to consider but with No biases & previous hearsay which could be inaccurate.

    Start each one with a completely clean slate regarding any hearsay

    There are some numbers noted below but please take the total and complete individual person into account take Everything into account leave no stone unturned. For example take into consideration the Era they Coached in, Rule changes, salary cap, free agency to name a few

    Hall of Fame Induction:

    1. Who is most deserving and why and in what order are each most deserving?

    2. Is each one deserving, if not, who is not deserving?

    3. If all or some or one of them are not deserving, could you make an argument for them and if no, why?

    Elaborate as much as you’d like

    Four (4) Coaches listed in order of their eligibility:

    Don Coryell eligible 28 to 29 years – No Super Bowl appearances – Playoff winning pct. .333

    Tom Flores eligible 27 to 28 years – 2 Super Bowl appearances 2 wins – Playoff winning pct. .727

    Jimmy Johnson eligible 16 years – 2 Super Bowl appearances 2 wins – Playoff winning pct. .692

    Tony Dungy eligible for 2 years – 1 Super Bowl appearance 1 win – Playoff winning pct. .474

    Super Bowl Wins:

    Flores 2
    Johnson 2
    Dungy 1
    Coryell 0

    HOF’s:
    Landry 2
    Parcells 2
    Shula 2
    Ewbank 1
    Stram 1
    Madden 1
    Allen 0
    Grant 0
    Levy 0

    Playoffs Winning Percentage:
    Flores .727
    Johnson .692
    Dungy .474
    Coryell .333

    Team Best Reg. Season Percentage:
    Dungy .759
    Flores .610
    Coryell .607
    Johnson .563

    Team Best Reg. Season Wins:
    Dungy 85
    Flores 83
    Coryell 69
    Johnson 44

    Team Best Total Wins:
    Dungy 92
    Flores 91
    Coryell 72
    Johnson 51

    Team Best Season Games over .500
    Dungy 58
    Flores 30
    Coryell 13
    Johnson 8

    (if any of this is incorrect let me know?
    Or any insight why he’s been overlooked? Thank you)

    SF

  4. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    RAIDERS have won 3 Super Bowls, Coach Flores has had an hand in All 3,
    1 as an Assistant
    2 as Head Coach

    1976: Coach John Madden wins Super Bowl (Coach Flores is Assistant)
    1978: Coach Madden 9 – 7 Season and retires
    1980: Coach Flores wins 1st of 2 Super Bowls
    Four (4) years 1976 to 1980 separate Madden’s Super Bowl to Flores’ 1st Super Bowl
    =
    *
    =
    From 2012 – TSF – Ron Glover and a RESPONSE to his story:

    THE SILENCED LEGACY OF Tom Flores

    Tom Flores is a groundbreaking NFL figure. In 1960, Flores became the first Hispanic quarterback to start as a member of the Oakland Raiders.

    Two decades later, Flores led the Raiders to a pair of Super Bowl victories (XV, XVIII) as a head coach, becoming the first minority coach to do so.

    Surprisingly, Flores remains only Hall of Fame eligible.

    Flores and w/cast-off Jim Plunkett brought Super Bowl titles to Oakland and Los Angeles.

    Tom Flores replaced Raiders head coach John Madden in 1979. Flores’ personality unlike Madden’s did not fit the traditional Raider mold. Flores was the quiet general in the midst of madmen — his will to win was the one requirement to lead an Al Davis franchise.

    Flores was the backup to Len Dawson when the Kansas City Chiefs won the 1969 AFL-NFL World Championship Game (Super Bowl IV). Flores retired as one of only twenty players to play during the entire existence of the AFL.

    In Oakland and Los Angeles, he solidified his legacy. The Raiders entered the playoffs as a wild-card in 1980. Oakland eventually marched into Super Bowl XV against a finesse Philadelphia Eagles team favored and deemed better by experts. The Raiders dominated the Eagles 27-10, and Flores won his first Super Bowl as a head coach.

    Three years later in Super Bowl XVIII, Flores and the Raiders faced the high-powered offense of the Washington Redskins. Led by Joe Theismann and a talented receiving corp, the Redskins were the most prolific offense in league history. The Raiders, who were now residents of Los Angeles, shut down the Redskins attack with a dogged defensive effort in a stunning 38-9 victory.

    At the forefront of the Raiders Super Bowl victories was former #1 overall pick Jim Plunkett. After failed stints in New England and San Francisco, Plunkett was written off by everyone. This qualified the former Heisman Trophy winner for a job with the Silver and Black. Flores, who was given the opportunity to play in the AFL by Al Davis, reached out to Jim Plunkett. Plunkett is of Native American decent. Neither are in the Hall of Fame despite each having two impactful Super Bowl victories.

    Flores career record (97-87) is not as gaudy as Bill Parcells and others, but his playoff winning percentage of 73 percent (8-3 record) is second only to Vince Lombardi (minimum 10 games).

    The two Super Bowl victories as an underdog cannot be overlooked.
    =
    =
    =
    RESPONSE:

    Temple3 says:
    October 22, 2012 at 2:31 pm
    Good stuff. Always like a piece on Flores.

    BTW, his coaching record with the Raiders is 83-53 and his winning percentage with them was .610 — higher than Bill Walsh’s .609. Flores went 14-34 with the Seahawks — with Stan Gelbaugh and Ric Mirer.

    Coached the only AFC teams to win a Super Bowl from 1980 to 1997. Only coach to beat Joe Gibbs in a Super Bowl.

    Just one thing about his playing days…he was the Raiders leading passer for 5 of their first 7 seasons and laid the foundation for what would become the NFL’s preeminent offensive team. From 1960 to 1984, the Raiders ranked in the top 10 in scoring for every season, except one. Flores was a big part of that. None of the league’s more celebrated offenses (SF, GB, MIA, SD, NE) can match that legacy of excellence.

    Thanks for keeping the flame alive. Gotta keep telling those stories — right!?!?

    Who knows…maybe someone on one of those committees will get with the program and break down his career the way it should be broken down.

  5. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    From 2013 – ESPN – Paul Gutierrez

    COMMENTARY

    Flores, Plunkett DESERVE CANTON CALL

    Hispanic coach, QB broke barriers and led the Raiders to their 1st Super Bowl XV win-

    Coach Tom Flores and quarterback Jim Plunkett paved the way for Hispanics in the NFL.

    ALAMEDA, Calif. — Their profiles struck a pose as proud as it was profound.

    Seemingly looking ahead to a promising future, they were on the cover of the premiere issue of NFL Pro magazine, their faces above the words “JIM PLUNKETT AND TOM FLORES: HISPANIC PRIDE, POISE AND AN NFL TITLE.”

    It was summer 1981, and the Oakland Raiders’ quarterback and coach were not only reigning atop the football world with a Super Bowl championship, they had blazed trails and broken barriers in doing so.

    And yet, neither understood the magnitude until years later. For Flores, it came when he was traveling the country and a man came up to him during one of his stops, thanked him and told him his father had cried after the Raiders beat the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl XV.

    “I didn’t even know him,” Flores recalled with a laugh. “It was about that Hispanic heritage that we shared. That’s when it really set in, when I saw how proud people were.

    “There were a lot of things I did that were influential, looking back.”

    Flores was the first Latino quarterback in the old AFL, the first Latino coach to win a Super Bowl, and in Seattle, the first Latino general manager in the NFL.

    “I’m proud of these things,” he said.

    And yet, if you were to ask the random fan today who the first minority coach was to win the Super Bowl, more often than not, they would say Tony Dungy.

    While Flores and Plunkett were looking forward in their iconic magazine cover shoot, perhaps it is best to take a look back, to the excitement the two created in a certain segment of society in the waning days of the Carter administration (yes, it was that long ago) to better understand the road they’ve traversed.


    Role models

    After the Raiders beat the San Diego Chargers in the AFC title game, Los Angeles Times columnist Frank del Olmo wrote on Jan. 16, 1981, of the effect the two had among Latinos in general, Mexican-Americans in particular.

    “So it’s a safe bet that in the coming two weeks the Raiders’ head coach, Tom Flores, and the team’s starting quarterback, Jim Plunkett, will be the most publicized and talked about Chicanos in the world,” the late del Olmo wrote. “At least this side of Cesar Chavez.”

    Yes, the civil rights activist and labor leader.

    “Whether the Raiders win or lose the Super Bowl game, millions of Latinos will be proud simply that Flores and Plunkett are there,” del Olmo added. “For they will be there not as representatives of their people, but as competent professionals whose skill, determination and hard work have brought them to the pinnacle of success in their field.”

    And there it was.

    Flores, whose parents were from Chihuahua, Mexico and who grew up working in the fields of the Central California valley, and Plunkett, the son of blind parents in Northern California, had become iconic figures. Not because of their shade of skin color, but because of who they were, and — to borrow from a famous speech — the content of their character, as seen by the masses.

    Their following only grew three years later, when the then-Los Angeles Raiders won the franchise’s third Super Bowl in eight years, this time blowing out defending champion Washington.

    Sal Castro, the late Chicano activist who helped organize the East Los Angeles high school walkouts in 1968 and died April 15, compared the ripple effect of Flores and Plunkett winning titles in football to the cultural phenomenon of “Fernandomania” in baseball, and not just in L.A., even if Fernando Valenzuela was from Mexico and Flores and Plunkett were as American as mom, apple pie, baseball and, well, Taco Bell.

    “Hell yes, there’s a cry in the community to have heroes,” Castro told me in 2011. “Throughout the Southwest, you see people walking around with Raiders shirts on … they’re part of the reason.

    “A lot of chavalitos [youngsters] are crying for positive role models. I hope there will be more Chicanos who will sleep standing up, to get taller. Guys like Flores and Plunkett opened doors. They broke barriers. Both came from humble beginnings, and that only adds to their story and how inspiring they are.”

    Or, as del Olmo wrote nearly 33 years ago of Plunkett, guys in the neighborhood were “talking about him as a Chicano, just like he was a homeboy from East L.A.”

    Plunkett, though, grew up in a San Jose barrio and won the Heisman Trophy at Stanford.

    “I’m proud to be Hispanic,” Plunkett told me on the 30th anniversary of the Raiders’ Super Bowl XV victory. “It’s who I am. And if it helps kids in our community around the country set goals, even better.

    “But it didn’t hit until later. That’s when you have a chance to really step back and take it all in, get an overall view of what I was able to do.”


    Long road for Plunkett

    Plunkett, who was the No. 1 overall draft pick in 1971 by the then-Boston Patriots, had early success in the league before injuries and ineffectiveness waylaid him. He found his way to San Francisco with the 49ers and was thisclose to being out of football for good when he went across the Bay to the Raiders to serve as Ken Stabler’s backup in 1979, which also happened to be Flores’ first year as coach after John Madden retired.

    But when Stabler was shipped to the Houston Oilers in a starter-for-starter trade for Dan Pastorini prior to the 1980 season, Plunkett had enough. He would not be able to compete for the starting gig and went to Flores and asked for his release.

    Flores convinced Plunkett to stick it out. His time came when Pastorini suffered a broken leg in Week 5. The Raiders were foundering at 2-3 when Plunkett became the full-time starter. Oakland won nine of its last 11 games and entered the playoffs as a wild card, beating old friend Stabler and the Oilers in the wild-card game, upending Cleveland in the famous “Red Right 88” game, when Mike Davis picked off Brian Sipe in the end zone, surviving an AFC title game shootout with the Chargers and heading to New Orleans for the Super Bowl.

    Plunkett’s story was equal parts Lazarus and Cinderella, all wrapped in one silver and black bow. Flores, who was known as the “Ice Man” for his cool demeanor as a player, called it a “resurrection” for Plunkett’s career. It’s the kind of stuff that embodies the very fabric of the NFL’s myth and ethos. And yet …

    “They’re being lost in the mist of time,” said Mario Longoria, who wrote “Athletes Remembered: Mexicano/Latino Professional Football Players, 1929-1970.”

    “They are fading into history, becoming obscure.”


    Hall of Fame?

    If you subscribe to the theory that you cannot write the definitive book on the purportedly inclusive NFL without mentioning the accomplishments and contributions of Flores and Plunkett, then where are their gold jackets, their busts in Canton?

    Indeed, many see the Pro Football Hall of Fame as an incomplete shrine without the two.

    “By all standards, they should be in the Hall of Fame,” Longoria lamented, “but they’re not and the voters don’t take the time to find out the whole story.”

    While not as stats-driven as the national pastime of baseball, the national obsession of football is more story-driven, even if Flores was 8-3 in the playoffs and is one of three coaches — with Jimmy Johnson and George Seifert — with at least two Super Bowl wins not already in the Hall. As happened to Seifert in Carolina, though, Flores did not win in his next stop, in Seattle.

    Still, Flores — who was the Raiders’ first quarterback and is one of a handful of QBs to have played in the AFL for its entire existence — has two other rings, one as Len Dawson’s backup in Kansas City for Super Bowl IV, and one as an assistant on Madden’s Oakland staff for Super Bowl XI.

    Lester Hayes, the former Raiders cornerback who won two rings with Flores, called the absence of his former coach in the Hall “so, so foul…the most unfair, the most unjust omission.”

    Flores, 76, pops up every now and then on an early Hall candidates list.

    “I don’t get too excited about it anymore,” he said. “I’m on the ballot and then I fall on the wayside. The voters, whoever they are, are not interested in what guys have done in the past. It’s about the more recent years.”

    Not that he’s against guys who deserve to get in on their first year of eligibility — he mentioned his former running back Marcus Allen as the perfect example of a player who should get in right away. It’s just that with the way the system works, anywhere from four to seven have to get into the Hall every year. And the 46 selectors hash it out in a sequestered room the day before the Super Bowl, whittling their list from 17 finalists, with a candidate needing 80 percent of the vote for election. The way the process plays out, selectors often act as “sponsors,” speaking for candidates, with backroom deals being bartered, critics charge.

    “The system is flawed,” Flores said. “It’s about who yells the loudest in that room.”

    Flores having worked for Raiders owner Al Davis also might be working against him in the minds of selectors.

    “The perception was that Al did it all,” Flores said, “and if they did some homework, they’d see that I coached the team.

    “He had input during the week. We talked all the time, second-guessed each other. I learned most everything from him, his leadership from him. But yeah, the impression was that Al did everything.

    “I don’t begrudge Al for that.”

    Plunkett, 65, was the MVP of Super Bowl XV and is the only eligible starting quarterback with at least two titles not in the Hall. Yeah, he threw a lot of picks, but do yourself a favor and compare his career numbers to those of Joe Namath.

    Meanwhile, Flores’ Hall lot now, he figures, rests with the seniors committee, which examines the cases of players and coaches whose careers have been over for at least 25 years. Plunkett, whose playing career ended in 1986, is already there. Flores, who coached Seattle in 1994, still has some time.

    Ray Guy, Flores’ punter with the Raiders, is a seniors committee nominee this year.

    “They won that first Super Bowl together; a Chicano coach and a Chicano quarterback,” Longoria said. “You cannot put a value on that as an accomplishment, especially not to Mexicans in the Southwest.”

    Transcendent figures, like altars to La Virgen de Guadalupe in the corners of some Latino homes? Not quite.

    But as linked intrinsically as they were successful, Flores and Plunkett are still together, so to speak, raging against time. They co-host with Greg Papa on preseason Raiders telecasts, while Flores joins Papa on the radio in the regular season and Plunkett is with Papa on-set for in-house Raiders television shows.

    “His record speaks for itself,” Flores said of Plunkett. “Maybe he didn’t go to Pro Bowls, but he won.”

    You could say the same of Flores, who actually introduced himself as the Raiders’ coach at Super Bowl media day in New Orleans.

    “I didn’t think anybody knew who I was,” he said.

    They should know now.

  6. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    From 2014 – ESPN – Paul Gutierrez

    Ray Guy stumps for Jim Plunkett, Cliff Branch, Tom Flores as fellow Hall of Famers

    OAKLAND — It was whispered in certain smoke-filled corners of Silver and Blackdom that Ray Guy could punt a football so far and so high, rain would come down with the pigskin.

    How appropriate, then, that it was in a virtual monsoon that Guy, the first pure punter to be enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, was honored Thursday night with a halftime ceremony and presented his ring by his children at O.co Coliseum.

    Guy is the 22nd Hall of Famer recognized by the Raiders, and 13 of them were on hand for the shindig — Ron Mix, Jim Otto, Willie Brown, Fred Biletnikoff, Art Shell, Ted Hendricks, Mike Haynes, Howie Long, Dave Casper, Marcus Allen, James Lofton, John Madden and Rod Woodson.

    But before the Oakland Raiders took on a longtime rival in the Kansas City Chiefs, Guy spoke with reporters under an awning to keep dry.

    Guy, who can speak on any number of topics at length, was asked who he thought should be the next Raiders representiative to have his bust next to his in Canton.

    “You can go with [Jim] Plunkett, Cliff Branch, Tom Flores, there’s a ton of them that can go in next,” Guy said. “When is that time? I know the criteria but sometimes they don’t look at the whole criteria. We’re going to push really hard from now on.

    “Now that I’m part of the Hall of Fame, I’ll have a little bit more voice. Hopefully we’ll get a lot more Raiders because we have a lot more deserving.”

    Tim Brown is a semifinalist again (he has been a finalist the past five years) and other names from the past brought up by fans and teammates alike include Ken Stabler, Lester Hayes, Steve Wisniewski, Jack Tatum, Dave Dalby and Raymond Chester.

    I asked Guy why he thought more Raiders were not already enshrined.

    “I don’t know,” he said. “It’s kind of a mystery. I guess there’s this mystique.

    “I can’t figure it out. We need to open their eyes a little more. It’s a different era when you’re talking about those guys. It’s not just about statistics.”

    Or think of it this way … when it rains, it pours.

  7. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    From 2011 – SIRIUS BARK BY TEMPLE3


    THE CASE FOR TOM FLORES TO ENTER THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME

    Perhaps the most widely known coach in the history of the NFL is John Madden. The former leader of the Oakland Raiders established a virtually unsurpassed record of regular season success during his brief ten-year tenure. Madden won more than 76% of his games. His closest active pursuer, Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin, has managed only a .672 winning percentage. John Madden also coached the Raiders to an impressive, physical victory over the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl XI, 32-14. After leaving the sidelines, Madden carved out the most unique, imposing and meaningful niche in the history of sports broadcasting. And, if that was not sufficient, he also established the premiere video gaming series that has redefined how our society views, plays, and understands football. Simply, John Madden’s football legacy is incomparable. In 2006, John Madden was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    Madden’s successor in Oakland and Los Angeles was the man pictured above, Tom Flores. Back in 1960, Flores shared passing duties with George Blanda and Babe Parilli, but he did most of the heavy lifting in the Raiders first season and over the next 6 seasons. The Raiders laid the foundation for one of the greatest offensive machines in league history. In the popular mind, the preeminent offensive teams were Bill Walsh’s San Francisco 49ers and the Miami Dolphins of Dan Marino. However, Al Davis’ Raiders ranked in the top 10 in scoring offense every year but 1 from their inception in 1960 until 1984. No team in the league has enjoyed a similar run of offensive prowess…not even the San Francisco 49ers during the era of Walsh and Seifert.

    During this run, Tom Flores was the leading passer on the team for five of their first 7 seasons. And, he won two Super Bowls as head coach – one in Oakland and one in Los Angeles.

    Time doesn’t permit a full exploration of all that Tom Flores achieved on the sidelines, but the recent nominations of Bill Cowher and Bill Parcells for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, suggest a few bullets may be in order.

    Consider these facts:
    Tom Flores coached the Raiders for 9 seasons and won 2 Super Bowls. John Madden coached the Raiders for 10 seasons and won 1 Super Bowl.

    Tom Flores amassed an 83-53 record with the Raiders, and a winning percentage of .610. Bill Walsh’s career winning percentage is .609. Marty Schottenheimer, another nominee for induction to Canton, has a .613 winning percentage.

    Tom Flores ranks 2nd all-time in playoff win percentage (10 games minimum) behind Vince Lombardi. Bill Parcells has an 11-8 career playoff record. Bill Cowher has a 12-9 career playoff record. Marty Schottenheimer has a 5-13 playoff record. Tom Flores is 8-3.

    After the 4th Super Bowl title of the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1979-80, Tom Flores’ Raiders were the only AFC teams to win the Super Bowl until 1997. The NFC dominated the Super Bowl for two decades with powerhouse teams in larger markets like New York, Chicago, Dallas, Washington, and northern California.

    Tom Flores won 2 Super Bowls in 4 years, and in 1983 he handed Washington Redskins head coach Joe Gibbs his only loss in a Super Bowl.

    Perhaps the thing that has kept Tom Flores out of the Pro Football Hall of Fame these many years, aside from a bias against Latino excellence and a league-wide contempt for the Raiders, is the fact that he coached in Seattle. The Great Northwest has been the equivalent of a Black Hole for talented football players. It’s where careers go to die. Flores coached the Seahawks for 3 years. His teams had a combined record of 14-34.

    Flores went from being a coach with a sterling 83-53 record to a rather pedestrian 97-87 (At .527, still ranked higher than Dick Vermeil).
    However, this should not undo the greatness that he achieved in Oakland and Los Angeles for the Silver & Black.
    Did a stint in Seattle keep Franco Harris from induction?
    Of course not.
    Did two 8-8 seasons in Seattle keep Warren Moon out of Canton?
    Of course not.
    The remoteness of Seattle and the irrelevance of many of their games may have shattered our collective memory of players like Cortez Kennedy, Kenny Easley and Curt Warner (with a C), but Flores should be teflon in this regard.

    Mike Holmgren is still regarded highly even though he’s only managed to win one Super Bowl and lost two. Holmgren has a 13-11 playoff record and, unlike Flores, he had prized QB’s at the helm in each of his playoff games. Jimmy Johnson and Bill Parcells are still revered though neither has been able to ameliorate the morass or mend the mess that is the Miami Dolphins.

    And, Tom Flores’ quarterbacks in Seattle were Stan Gelbaugh and Rick Mirer!! That he managed to win as many as 14 games in 3 years with these passers qualifies as a minor miracle.

    Some other thoughts to consider on Tom Flores:

    In 1980, the Raiders won the Super Bowl as a Wild Card. Statistically, the Eagles were “better” than the Raiders on both sides of the ball, but Flores and his staff and team figured out a way to win that game.

    Since 1980, Eagles QB Ron Jaworski has become nationally known as a broadcaster and analyst for ESPN. Perhaps he could take up the mantle on behalf of Tom Flores. It’s long overdue.

    In 1983, the Raiders beat a team with one of the largest statistical advantages in league history entering a Super Bowl. The Redskins were defending champions and were perceived to be a juggernaut. Jack Squirek did to Joe Theismann what Rod Martin did to Ron Jaworksi. And Marcus Allen did to the Redskins defense what Kenny King had done to the Eagles only three years prior.

    Since 1983, Redskins QB Joe Theismann has become nationally known as a broadcaster and analyst for ESPN and the NFL Network. Perhaps he could take up the mantle on behalf of Tom Flores. It’s long overdue.

    Tom Flores won two Super Bowls with an over-the-hill, washed up, washed out quarterback named Jim Plunkett. He beat long odds twice and still stands in the record book — right next to Vince Lombardi as the second-winningest coach in the post-season with an astounding .727 winning percentage.

    It’s time for Flores to make his speech and be heard…for perhaps the first time.

  8. Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015
    Reply

    From 2007 – John P. Lopez

    On a day of diversity, let’s not forget Flores

    Pack journalism has been at its tightly grouped best for two weeks now, never straying from Miami stories that are certainly nice, intriguing and, of course, worthwhile.

    There’s been the whole Peyton Manning thing. There’s been the sorry NFL pension plan thing.

    There’s been the obligatory no-respect angle for the Chicago Bears.
    =
    And of course Saturday, there was the Hall of Fame quandary — so many candidates, so few slots and so much closed-door politicking from a mere 40 voters.

    This is not to bash my journalistic brethren. Super Bowl week isn’t exactly conducive to originality.


    Overlooking the obvious

    But it is to illustrate that even those at the tops of their crafts can sometimes fail to recognize the irony and injustice staring them in the face.

    More than any other story, the prevailing theme for Super Bowl XLI has been the groundbreaking accomplishment of coaches Tony Dungy and Lovie Smith becoming the first black coaches in the Super Bowl.

    It is a wonderful thing, of course.

    A day has not gone by in the Super Bowl’s buildup when Dungy and Smith have not been asked, often dozens of times, about the standard they have set.

    But groundbreaking?

    Well, yeah. In one respect they are, but the term that has been thrown about so much this week is not altogether right.

    On the other end of the telephone this week, speaking from his home in California, was former Oakland Raiders coach and general manager Tom Flores.

    Some 26 years ago, Flores was the first Hispanic coach to take a team to a Super Bowl.

    In the official NFL Web recap of that 27-10 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles, Flores’ name is not mentioned.

    Flores went on to win another Super Bowl, as well as become the first Hispanic NFL general manager and first Hispanic NFL club president.

    Flores’ starting quarterback in Super Bowl XV was Jim Plunkett, who was the first Hispanic quarterback to play in and win a Super Bowl, throwing for three touchdowns and 261 yards.

    So how many questions did Flores and Plunkett get about their pioneering Super Bowl feat 26 years ago?

    “None,” Flores said. “Not one question that I can remember.

    “I was aware of it and in the (Hispanic) communities I would visit and places I went, it was a big deal. It did not go unnoticed. Hispanics were aware of it.

    “But that’s where it ended. The writers just didn’t ask that question. It wasn’t a story and honestly, at the time I just wanted to worry about coaching football.”


    A degree of hypocrisy

    Today, of course, is a good day to recognize inclusiveness and diversity in sports.

    But it also is a day when the hypocrisy of NFL officials and members of the media practically pulling muscles as they pat themselves on the back over recognizing Dungy and Smith — should be noted as well.

    Dungy and Smith deserve every accolade and compliment they get, but Saturday’s Hall of Fame vote showed just how much the league and those who cover it have not captured the whole picture.

    This year, there was much hand-wringing, lobbying and angst over what was considered a talented and all-too deserving list of Pro Football Hall candidates. Some 17 names made the final ballot for Hall entry.

    But one that did not make the list: Flores.

    If you do not think this is as egregious an omission as ever — discriminatory, really — ask yourself these questions, Hall voters:

    Would you recognize a man who was the first black NFL quarterback?

    What if that man also was the first black to coach a Super Bowl team? The first to win a Super Bowl? Then two? And that same man then became the first black NFL general manager?

    Would you recognize him if he also won more games than Bill Walsh or Jimmy Johnson, and had as many wins (105) and Super Bowl titles as Vince Lombardi?

    Would you recognize him if he accomplished all these things the hard way, growing up the son of a blue-collar man who emigrated to the United States as a 12-year-old?

    Would you be swayed by stories of how he constantly was told that people of his ethnicity could not play quarterback and could not dream of being a coach?

    After college ball, he had to go to the Canadian Football League to prove himself, until a forward-thinking owner named Al Davis found him. Then, he promptly led the league in virtually every quarterbacking category.


    A barrier breaker

    Flores did all of that — an NFL barrier-breaker at virtually every level of the game. Only, he’s not black.

    He is Hispanic. That’s why NFL leadership and those who cover the league should not get full of themselves over celebrating inclusiveness and diversity today.

    They’re still leaving one ethnicity in the trash bin. They’re glossing over the facts, forgetting history and failing to punch the most deserving ticket for Canton, all for the sake of a good story in the here and now.

    “There’s a sense of pride for what I did for Hispanics,” Flores said. “I became more aware of what it meant to Hispanic people as the years have gone by.

    “But I don’t wear it on my lapel. I’m proud of it. But I’d rather be remembered as the first to get to the Super Bowl and win it. Al Davis knew he was hiring a minority, but he didn’t hire me because of that. He hired me because he thought I could win football games, and that’s why it means more.”

    Still, as Flores has felt a sense of pride for Dungy and Smith lately, the rest of the football world should feel obligated to right a longtime wrong.

    “Nobody other than my wife, family and friends made a big deal about it back then,” Flores said. “It wasn’t a story at that time.

    “Nobody ever thought history was being made.”

    Sadly, 26 years later, most still don’t.

  9. February 18, 2015
    Reply

    Legendary Twice Super Bowl Winning Coach, Tom Flores, Left Off the NFL Hall of Fame Semifinal Lists ~ Shame, Shame, NFL ~

    He has FOUR Super Bowl Championship rings; one as a player, an assistant coach and twice as head coach for the World Superbowl Champion Los Angeles and Oakland Raiders.

    But, that’s not enough to convince the voters to consider inducting the first Mexican American quarterback and head coach in pro football (and the first General Manager of a professional football team with the Seattle Seahawks, among many other accomplishments) to be so honored. Tom Flores has distinguished himself in the pro-football community as few have (much less the fact he is a Latino) in the last 51 years, and still going strong as a color commentator for the Oakland Raiders Radio Network. He is already a member of the California Sports Hall of Fame and the old American Football (and holds several records as a quarterback in that fledgling) league that reached such profound football greatness it had to be considered legitimate enough in the course of its play that it caused having to merge with the established league. Had there been no merger football fans would not be enjoying the most significant sporting event in world history, the Super Bowl. How many current inductees in the NFL HOF can present a greater resume?

    Flores was recently honored by the National Council of La Raza with the coveted “Roberto Clemente Award for Sports Excellence” in Washington, D.C. That gesture was not based on a public relations ploy by the Mexican American community. It is aware (and recognized) one individual from within its community has not only distinguished himself above and beyond the norm, but has surpassed many of the accomplishments from other members of the predominate community with a commitment to excellence rarely experienced. If nothing else (and we all know there is a certain amount of politics that plays into the minds of the voters) the owners could have made note to the voters that based on the changing demographics, electing a Latino to the Hall of Fame would obviously be a stroke of public relations genius, which would obviously increase attendance. If nothing else, it would have created a more appreciated atmosphere towards a consumer that will soon be the largest paying customers in the sports community. Look out NFL, the game of soccer (which is favored by Latinos more than pro football) is rearing its ugly head.

    [cut and paste the following URL to see Tom Flores acceptance speech. It will make you proud to be an American]

    http://itseemstomebyjoeortiz.blogspot.com/2011/08/two-time-super-bowl-winning-coach-tom.html

    The semifinalists for the 2012 National Football League Hall of Fame are listed below, in alphabetical order:
    Steve Atwater, S — 1989-1998 Denver Broncos, 1999 New York Jets
    Jerome Bettis, RB — 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers
    Tim Brown, WR/KR — 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
    Cris Carter, WR — 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins
    Don Coryell, Coach — 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers
    Roger Craig, RB — 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings
    Terrell Davis, RB — 1995-2001 Denver Broncos
    Dermontti Dawson, C — 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers
    Edward DeBartolo Jr., Owner — 1979-2000 San Francisco 49ers
    Chris Doleman, DE/LB — 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers
    Kevin Greene, LB/DE — 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers
    Charles Haley, DE/LB — 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys
    Cortez Kennedy, DT — 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks
    Curtis Martin, RB — 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets
    Clay Matthews, LB — 1978-1993 Cleveland Browns, 1994-96 Atlanta Falcons
    Karl Mecklenburg, LB — 1983-1994 Denver Broncos
    Bill Parcells, Coach — 1983-1990 New York Giants, 1993-96 New England Patriots, 1997-99 New York Jets, 2003-06 Dallas Cowboys
    Andre Reed, WR — 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins
    Willie Roaf, OT — 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs
    Donnie Shell, S — 1974-1987 Pittsburgh Steelers
    Will Shields, OG — 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs
    Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner — 1989-2006 National Football League
    Steve Tasker, ST/WR — 1985-86 Houston Oilers, 1986-1997 Buffalo Bills
    Aeneas Williams, CB/S — 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams
    Ron Wolf, Contributor — 1963-1974, 1978-1990 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, 1975-77 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1990 New York Jets, 1991-2001 Green Bay Packers
    George Young, Contributor — 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League

  10. Sports Fan
    February 19, 2015
    Reply

    From 2011 – Adrian Perez

    Tom Flores: His last year to get in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

    Flores is not the first Hispanic to play pro football, but he is the first Hispanic to play starting quarterback for an NFL team and was first to win four Super Bowl rings.

    OAKLAND, CA — In recognizing Thomas Raymond Flores (AKA Coach Tom Flores), the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) has out done the one organization that is supposed to acknowledge individuals who have accomplished outstanding athletic fetes, the Pro Football Hall of Fame (HOF). It took one of the nation’s largest Hispanic organizations to present Coach Tom Flores with the prestigious “Roberto Clemente Award for Sports Excellence.” The award is presented by NCLR to sports professionals who positively portray Hispanic Americans and promote efforts to help Hispanics across the U.S.

    Not to say that the HOF should induct Flores based on his ethnicity, however, it has been hinted that perhaps the oversight of Flores induction could be based on his Mexican-American background. Still, others allege that his continued affiliation with Raider’s owner Al Davis has poisoned his chances of being recognized. It’s possible, but unlikely.

    Flores is not the first Hispanic to play pro football, but he is the first Hispanic to play starting quarterback for an NFL team and was first to win four Super Bowl rings. But, apparently that isn’t enough for the HOF.

    Of the 267 members who have been inducted into the HOF, only 2 are Hispanic – Tom Fears, a receiver for the Los Angeles Rams (1948-1950), and Anthony Munoz, a lineman for the Cincinnati Bengals (1981-1991). Not to minimize their accomplishments in the NFL, Fears and Munoz were very deserving of an induction, but in weighing their accomplishments in the NFL, Flores stands head and shoulders above them.

    Born March 21, 1937 in Fresno, California, Flores grew up picking grapes and playing football for Sanger High School. Upon graduating, he headed north to play for the University of the Pacific Tigers and upon graduating he went to play for the Canadian Football League before landing as the Oakland Raider’s first Quarterback from 1960 to 1966. These weren’t easy years for the start-up team since they had to play their games at San Francisco’s Kezar and Candlestick Stadiums until Oakland completed the Coliseum.

    As the Raider’s quarterback, Flores averaged a 50 percent pass completion rate, and gave them three winning seasons before being traded to the Buffalo Bills in 1967. Two years later he was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs where he retired in 1970.

    Flores came back to the Raiders in 1972 as Assistant Coach, coaching the wide receivers, tight ends and quarterbacks. His big break came in 1979 after the legendary John Madden retired and Al Davis, now managing owner of the Raiders, picked Flores to be the head coach. He took the Raiders to the Super Bowl and won in 1981 and 1984, with the latter being the only Super Bowl championship by a Southern California NFL team. After that game, Al Davis exclaimed: “Tom Flores isn’t just a great coach in our league. With all due respect, he’s one of the greatest coaches of all time.”

    Interestingly, nearly every player Flores coached in those championship years is now part of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, except him and another Mexican-American, Jim Plunkett – the starting quarterback for the Raiders in the 1984 Super Bowl game.

    Today, Flores remains tied to the Raiders as the “color man” for the Raider Nation Radio Network. But, it’s his community involvement and giving that is also very impressive.

    Since the 1980s, Flores has hosted an annual golf tournament in Los Angeles to benefit the Boy Scouts with Disabilities, an event that has raised over $3.5 million since. In addition, he established the Tom Flores Foundation that benefits low-income youth in his hometown of Sanger, California, which also named their high school stadium in his name.

    Flores has even found the time to author his biography, “Fire In the Ice Man,” and co-authored “Tales of the Oakland Raiders,” two books still selling well across the nation.
    Obviously, the only thing missing is his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Two other coaches, Mike Ditka and Tony Dungy, share similar records as Flores, of which only Ditka has been inducted. Dungy still has time to be inducted, but unfortunately, this is Coach Flores’ last year to be inducted into the HOF, a process controlled by sports writers.

    Since 2009, the National Football League has stated it wants to grow its Hispanic fan base. There would be no greater recruitment tool than inducting Flores into the HOF and use the ceremonies to market the NFL to Hispanics across the U.S. Not all of the 50+ million Hispanics living in the U.S. are soccer fans.

    VIDEO: Coach Tom Flores accepting the prestigious Robert Clemente Award for Sports Excellence…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HScBAZVWkg


    (Side note: Coach Flores is still eligible for Enshrinement)

  11. Sports Fan
    February 19, 2015
    Reply

    From 2013 – 89.3 KPCC – By Take Two

    Why aren’t the NFL’s first minority Super Bowl winners in the Hall Of Fame?

    It’s the last day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, a time celebrating the contributions of Latinos to the United States.

    There have been concerts and art exhibits highlighting the accomplishments of Latinos past and present, but two trailblazing Chicanos have been all but forgotten.

    In 1981, the Oakland Raiders’ Tom Flores and Jim Plunkett became the first minorities to win a Super Bowl as a head coach and quarterback, respectively. Three years later they did it again when the Raiders played in Los Angeles.

    They’ve got championships on their resumes and the distinction of being first, but neither is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and — as time goes on — the memory of what they did gets even fainter.

    ESPN.com’s Paul Gutierrez joins the show with more.

    Hear the full must hear excellent interview at the link below:

    http://www.scpr.org/programs/take-two/2013/10/15/34161/why-aren-t-the-nfl-s-first-minority-super-bowl-win/

  12. Sports Fan
    February 20, 2015
    Reply

    Facebook

    News Feed

    Alonzo Madero reviewed LULAC. — 4 star
    January 27 at 7:25pm ·
    Why aren’t we pushing for Tom Flores and Jim Plunkett to get admitted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame?
    Not very many Latinos have been voted in despite having better credentials than many players that are in.
    Plunkett and Flores won 2 Super Bowls.
    When Art Shell was asked how he felt being the first minority head coach in the NFL, he reminded the media that he was the 2nd minority head coach after Tom Flores.

    LULAC.
    Charity Organization


    20,489 Likes
    650 talking about this
    Share
    Alonzo Madero likes this.

    click or copy link:

    https://www.facebook.com/alonzo.madero.3/activity/909584032399593

  13. Sports Fan
    February 20, 2015
    Reply

    2002 Dave Casper’s INDUCTION SPEECH
    Pro Football Hall of Fame – Canton, Ohio – ENSHRINEMENT

    “…We have Tom Flores who was my receiver coach. I’m not sure Tom taught me how to play tight end but he taught me how to learn how to play tight end. Every day he worked with me, taught me a lot of skills. Nobody else was a better teacher – the Raiders were great teachers…”

  14. Sports Fan
    February 20, 2015
    Reply

    Branch Talks About Tom Flores

    Raiders legend Cliff Branch talks about Tom Flores

    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Branch-Talks-About-Tom-Flores/0fd5f0e9-7e8d-4d18-81ce-69bc8d99d7ae

  15. Sports Fan
    February 20, 2015
    Reply

    From 2006 – TIMES STAFF REPORTS

    1985 – SEÑOR INTERNACIONAL – MR. INTERNATIONAL – LULAC No. 12

    2006 – LAREDO LATIN AMERICAN HALL OF FAME

    Ex-NFL Player, Coach Flores named to Laredo Latin Hall

    The Laredo Latin American International Sports Hall of Fame

    First inductee Tom Flores, the former NFL star and coach.

    He is involved in the California community through his foundation. He has an honorary doctorate from Pepperdine University humanitarian service and is a former board of regents member at University of Pacific.

    Honored 1985 as the LULAC No. 12 – Mr. International

    From Sanger, CA, three-sport star football, basketball and baseball at Sanger High School, Fresno Junior College and College of Pacific.

    A senior quarterback, fourth in the nation in total offense and sixth in passing efficiency.

    Played in the East-West Shrine Game.

    Legendary NFL Player and Head Coach might not have known how proud the Hispanic community was growing up as a kid in the northern California.

    Years later as head coach of the World Champion Oakland Raiders, he realized just how proud Latinos can be when the Raiders moved to Los Angeles.

    Flores, knows exactly how proud Hispanics can be.

    “Anytime your honored by an association of your ethnic peers, it makes you very proud. It shows that youve done something that has impacted a community…

    The Hispanic community has a lot of pride. I found that out when we moved to Los Angeles and how proud the East Los Angeles community was…it was refreshing for me to see that…

    At that time I was just a coach trying to win football games, but I found out that Latinos are a proud race and to be inducted into the Latin Hall is quite an honor…

    Knowing you’re the best that year is an indescribable feeling. The fact that you’ve accomplished something feels great.”

    35 years NFL Player, Assistant Coach, Head Coach, General Manager and Team President.

    Flores, four Super Bowl rings and one Championship, is in an elite group.

  16. Sports Fan
    February 21, 2015
    Reply

    Mr. Ron Borges of Talk of Fame gives an EXCELLENT “State Your Case: Tom Flores” Presentation – MUST HEAR!

    Talk of Fame Show 2/20/15 Web Version – SoundCloud

    click or copy link:

    https://soundcloud.com/talkoffame321/talk-of-fame-show-2-20-15-web-version

    Re: Coach Tom Flores you can click to find these timed starting/ending points

    32:20 – 32:29 – (“Mucho Gusto!”)

    38:21 – 41:19 – (Ron Borges takes the floor – EXCELLENT Presentation “INJUSTICE, THY NAME is Tom Flores”)!

    1:04:10 – (1:05:17) 1:05:31 – (HOF Ron Wolf on Tom Flores)

    =
    =
    =

    1. Please forward this entire State Your Case: Tom Flores to each HOF Voter and your contacts

    2. As well as this Talk of Fame show segment to each HOF Voter and contacts so that they can hear first hand Ron Borges on Tom Flores

    click or copy link:

    http://www.talkoffamenetwork.com/state-your-case-tom-flores/

  17. Sports Fan
    February 21, 2015
    Reply

    1980 Super Bowl Wild Card Win

    What are the Odds to enter the NFL Playoffs as a Wild Card Team? Carefully consider these Odds

    Consider all the great Wild Card Teams for the past 45 years, that is a lot of Teams

    Who was the first Wild Card Team to win it all?


    The Professional Football Hall of Fame stated:

    History of the Wild Card

    Tough Odds

    Since the Wild Card System began in 1970, only eleven (11) Wild Card Teams have advanced all the way to the Super Bowl.

    Of those eleven (11) Teams, ONLY seven (7) Teams won the Super Bowl over those 45 years.

    The 1980 Oakland Raiders/Coach Tom Flores were the FIRST Wild Card team to win a Super Bowl.
    =
    17 years would pass before another Wild Card Team would win a Super Bowl

    In an earlier post on this Website for this topic, breaks down each of those games and other posts offer explanation to the importance during the 1980 Super Bowl season Wild Card Win!

  18. Sports Fan
    February 21, 2015
    Reply

    VOTE Coach Tom Flores HALL OF FAME!

    the autumn wind

    The Autumn Wind is a pirate
    Blustering in from sea
    With a rollicking song he sweeps along
    swaggering boisterously
    His face is weather beaten
    He wears a hooded sash
    With his silver hat about his head
    And a bristly black moustache
    He growls as he storms the country
    A villain big and bold
    And the trees all shake and quiver and quake
    As he robs them of their gold
    The Autumn wind is a Raider
    Pillaging just for fun
    He’ll knock you ’round and upside down
    And laugh when he’s conquered and won.

    Written by Steve Sabol
    Featuring the voice of John Facenda

    click or copy link:

    http://theraidercast.com/the-autumn-wind/

    VOTE Coach Tom Flores!

  19. Sports Fan
    February 22, 2015
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame & Commenters,

    Thank you again for this “State Your Case: Tom Flores”

    If any of this information is incorrect or if any additional accolades were left off please let me know?

    =
    =
    1982 – NFL-AFC: COACH OF THE YEAR

    1985 – SEÑOR INTERNACIONAL – MR. INTERNATIONAL – LULAC No. 12

    1986 – WESTWOOD SHRINE’S HUMANITARIAN OF THE YEAR AWARD

    1987 – PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME CANDIDATE

    1989 – MERIT OF EXCELLENCE AWARD

    2001-2015 – PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME PRELIMINARY BALLOT NOMINEE

    2003 – MULTI-ETHNIC SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2006 – LAREDO LATIN AMERICAN HALL OF FAME

    2007 – CALIFORNIA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2011 – ROBERTO CLEMENTE AWARD

    2012 – BAY AREA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

    2012 – NFLPA COLLEGIATE BOWL COACH
    =
    – INVOLVED IN THE CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY THROUGH HIS FOUNDATION
    – HONORARY DOCTORATE PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY HUMANITARIAN SERVICE
    – FORMER BOARD OF REGENTS MEMBER UNIVERSITY OF PACIFIC

  20. Sports Fan
    February 22, 2015
    Reply

    ON TWITTER:

    Rick Gosselin
    ‏@RickGosselinDMN
    Is former Raiders coach Tom Flores worthy of the Hall of Fame?
    Ron Borges States his Case at Talk of Fame Network:

    http://www.talkoffamenetwork.com/state-your-case-tom-flores/

    RETWEETS
    55
    FAVORITES
    69

    4:33 AM – 17 Feb 2015

    Nick Fury ‏@106Street Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    yeah the first minority coach to win a superbowl is a big deal. Also won as a player.
    1 favorite
    Favorite1

    EriekPump ‏@eriek_pump Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    YEAH if.levy and parcells is flores def. Is

    Nick Fury ‏@106Street Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    Plunkett needs to be in there too

    TDMAKER ‏@gman1232 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    Tom was a TRAIL BLAZER! Al Davis opened the doors but Flores did the necessary work.
    #flores4hof

    TDMAKER ‏@gman1232 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    wasnt he the first minority qb to start a game?

    RaiderLex ‏@Eternal_Raider Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @VicTafur
    He is more than worthy! Stats don’t lie #RaiderNation
    1 favorite
    Favorite1

    Raiderlive ‏@RAIDERLIVE Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    4 super bowls, part of the brains madden used to win. Of course, he should already be on there. + minority status


    mike hampton ‏@sdmikeh Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    hmmm… First Latino coach… Won 2 rings as coach of the Raiders…. Yeah, he should be in
    1 favorite
    Favorite1

    Alan Black ‏@Alan648 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    SB winning coach, should be an automatic no brainer
    1 favorite
    Favorite1

    A Salinas ‏@TheScribe64 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    Tom Flores is a Mexi-CAN baby! 2 Super Bowl victories, what’s a vato from the 559 gotta do?

    aaron hardy ‏@aehardy80 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    yes flores should be in, plunkett and stabler too. Don’t understand why they not in.

    Carlos Teran ‏@ctraider38 Feb 17
    @RickGosselinDMN @RAIDERS
    Tom Flores is absolutely belonging in the hall of fame. What would be the argument against it?
    0 replies 0 retweets 0 favorites

    Mario Martinez ‏@Mario_MMartinez Feb 17
    “@RickGosselinDMN:
    Is former Raiders coach Tom Flores worthy of the Hall of Fame? Ron Borges States his Case at Talk of Fame Network” YES
    =
    =
    =

    Ron Borges
    ‏@RonBorges
    Does Tom Flores belong in the HOF? @

    http://www.talkoffamenetwork.com/state-your-case-tom-flores/

    FAVORITES
    2

    1:45 PM – 17 Feb 2015

    Jason Cloutier ‏@JKLUTE1 Feb 17
    @RonBorges
    Only coach with 2 SB titles who gets little to no credit for those titles…people think it was easy coaching that bunch of guys
    1 retweet
    Retweet1

    Brian M ‏@Sportsman2001 Feb 17
    @RonBorges
    YES!

  21. Sports Fan
    February 23, 2015
    Reply

    VOTE Coach Tom Flores Professional Football Hall of Fame:

    A Sports Writer recently noted:
    “Tom Flores: The least known and least appreciated multiple Super Bowl-winning coach.”

    Several Sports Writers use this criteria:
    “The Professional Football Hall of Fame is for people that you can’t write the history of the Professional Football without them”

    …if true, then let us carefully reconsider Coach Tom Flores by that same criteria!

    Pioneer? Yes!

    Trailblazer? Yes!

    Groundbreaking? Yes!

    A Barrier Breaker? Yes!

    Beat the Odds? Yes!

    Overcame? Yes!

    First of the First? Yes!

    First and Only? Yes!

    And All at the Highest Level? Yes!

    If you take Everything out of the record books

    If your erase Everything he has done, Everything about him

    Then in fact you Cannot write the history of Professional Football without him

    Win or Lose…his Commitment to Excellence speaks for itself

    “It is not the critic who counts;
    not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles,
    or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.
    The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena,
    whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood;
    who strives valiantly;
    who errs,
    who comes short again and again,
    because there is no effort without error and shortcoming;
    but who does actually strive to do the deeds;
    who knows great enthusiasms,
    the great devotions;
    who spends himself in a worthy cause;
    who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement,
    and who at the worst,
    if he fails,
    at least fails while daring greatly,
    so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

    “Courage is not having the strength to go on; it is going on when you don’t have the strength.”

    “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.”

    “Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”

    “The only man who never makes mistakes is the man who never does anything.”

    “Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty… I have never in my life envied a human being who led an easy life. I have envied a great many people who led difficult lives and led them well.”

    “Never throughout history has a man who lived a life of ease left a name worth remembering.”

    Players, Coaches, Contributors understand these words because they have lived them
    “The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena”

  22. Sports Fan
    February 24, 2015
    Reply

    ANSWERS.COM

    How many Hispanics in the NFL Hall of Fame?

    Answer by Trivia Dan

    Three (3):

    Tom Fears, first Mexican-American enshrined
    Steve Van Buren
    Anthony Munoz

    Trivia Dan states:
    “In many people’s opinion,
    INCLUDING MINE,
    the first-ever Hispanic pro starting QB and 2-time Super Bowl-winning head coach, Tom Flores,
    and his QB, Jim Plunkett, the only eligible 2-time winning Super Bowl QB not in the Hall, SHOULD BE, but they are not as of 2014.”

    This is a direct quote by Trivia Dan of ANSWERS.COM

  23. Sports Fan
    February 26, 2015
    Reply

    Talk of Fame and Fans,

    Coach Tom Flores’ ’83 Raiders

    Please feel free to correct any of this:

    In the 95 year history of Pro Football the 1983 Washington Redskins are still considered one of the Greatest Of All-Time even though 32 years have now passed

    In 1983
    Gibbs the Genius (I’m a Big Gibbs fan)
    Theismann MVP (I’m a Big Joe fan)
    Riggo, Hogs, Smurfs (a fan)
    Were in fact the Greatest Of All-Time and they had all the records to prove it

    7-1 at Home
    7-1 on Road
    and the 2 games they lost, they lost by one (1) point…repeat one (1) point
    =
    =
    The Super Bowl XVIII 1983 Raiders Win 38 to 9 over Washington

    Washington Redskins: NFC Champion – 1st NFC East – and were the DEFENDING Super Bowl Champions

    Coach Joe Gibbs: Hall of Fame – 4 Super Bowls & 3x Super Bowl Champion
    – Joe Theismann MVP
    – Coach Gibbs was fresh off of beating John Robinson/Eric Dickerson 51-7 and Bill Walsh/Joe Montana
    – Highest scoring team, most prolific offense, largest statistical advantages in National Football history!
    – ’83 team considered one of the best if not the best Coach Gibbs team of All-Time!
    – The Best defending Super Bowl Champion Ever!
    – 2015 still ranked one of the Best teams Ever!
    – Raiders held this powerful defending Champion’s offense to 9 points!
    – Super Bowl record with fewest passing touchdowns!
    – 38 points scored by Raiders most by Super Bowl team to that point in time


    Coach Flores’ Raiders was again the underdog and prevailed against the odds
    Coaching win over Hall of Fame Coach Joe Gibbs (often described in Sports circles as a “Genius”) his only Super Bowl defeat

    KEEP IN MIND: Had Washington won, they would have been considered one of the Greatest Teams of All-Time and even though they lost they still are!
    =
    =

    Two (2) different Sports Polls below:

    =
    =
    From 2014/2015 By FOX Sports

    NFL’s Greatest Teams NOT to win the Super Bowl: 1-40 & 1-35

    2014 – 40 Greatest Teams
    &
    2015 – 35 Greatest Teams
    Not To Win The Super Bowl —
    a 2014 list that researches 48 NFL campaigns (1966-2013)
    and
    a 2015 list researched 49 NFL campaigns (1966-2014)
    and rewards overall record (regular season), per-game point differential, turnover margin, strength of schedule, divisional superiority, blowout victories … and any other bits of extra credit that may vault teams into the countdown.

    =

    Rank Number Three (3): 1983 WASHINGTON REDSKINS


    Regular Season Record: 14-2
    Home: 7-1 … Road: 7-1
    Per-Game Point Differential: +13.1
    Turnover Margin: +43
    Wins Of 10 Points Or More: 11
    Losses to sub-.500 teams: 0
    Record vs. playoff teams: 5-1
    Strength of division (minimum to maximum scale of 1 to 5): 3
    Playoff Extra Credit: Lost in Super Bowl (Tom Flores’ Raiders)

    OVERVIEW

    From a regular-season perspective, the 1983 Redskins TRUMP NEARLY ALL 40 COMERS IN THIS COUNTDOWN.
    – The only thing preventing a No. 2 ranking is quite obvious:
    – It’s hard to lose 38-9 in Super Bowl XVIII (to the Raiders) and expect glowing recollections from everyone in the NFL universe

    – Looking at the numbers, the 1998 Vikings had a better overall record, more points scored and one additional blowout victory.
    – But the Redskins, led by QB Joe Theismann, John Riggins, Art Monk, rookie Darrell Green and head coach Joe Gibbs, prevailed in the end
    – thanks to an eye-popping turnover margin (+43)
    – a 5-1 mark versus playoff teams (including a win over the eventual champion Raiders that October)
    – two one-point defeats
    – and an actual Super Bowl appearance

    There’s also this consolation prize:
    The 1983 Redskins are the GREATEST DEFENDING SUPER BOWL CHAMPS NOT to repeat the following season.

    =
    =
    =
    Posted by Ron Borges on February 25, 2015 at 12:01 am

    ’83 REDSKINS VOTED BEST TEAM NEVER TO WIN SUPER BOWL

    Talk Of Fame Network

    In a stunning upset, the 1983 Washington Redskins outpolled the record-breaking and nearly undefeated 2007 New England Patriots as the best team NOT to win a Super Bowl championships.

    Our listeners and readers backed the Redskins with 59.1% of the vote to the Patriots’ 23.6% despite the fact New England was 18-0 and gunning for immortality when it lost the Super Bowl to the New York Giants, 17-14, when it took a David Tyree “helmet” catch to make it possible.

    Still, the voters opted for the ’83 Redskins team that finished 14-2 and became the first NFL offense to put up 500 points in a single season. Joe Theismann was voted league MVP that year, and future Hall-of-Fame running back John Riggins powered his way to 1,347 yards and a remarkable 24 touchdowns running behind “The Hogs.”

    Finishing a distant third was the best of Buffalo’s four consecutive AFC championship teams, the 1990 Bills, who polled 9.9% of the vote. They led the league in scoring behind the K-Gun offense run by Jim Kelly and finished top 10 in defense. But they also lost to the Giants (can you spell spoilers?), 20-19, when Scott Norwood’s last-second field goal attempt went WIDE RIGHT .

    The 1969 Minnesota Vikings garnered only eight per cent of the vote, despite having a team that ranked first in scoring offense and first in scoring defense and that finished the regular season 12-2, yet only 7.4% of the poll respondent named them. Fiery quarterback Joe Kapp was voted the NFL’s Most Valuable Player that season, and the Vikings were 12-point favorites to defeat the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl IV … only to lose 23-7 in the final NFL-AFL championship game.

    =
    =

    Coach Tom Flores and the entire Raider organization can look back 32 years and still state we beat one of if not the Greatest Of All-Time and Talk Of Fame confirmed it with their recent 2015 Poll

    HOF Voters need to reconsider this important victory led by Coach Tom Flores and who his team defeated on the field and give Coach Flores the respect he’s deserved now for over three (3) decades

    Mr. Borges and Talk Of Fame,
    Your recent Poll confirms, the history of Pro Football CANNOT be written unless you include Tom Flores

  24. Sports Fan
    February 26, 2015
    Reply

    “THAT’S IMPOSSIBLE”

    From 2002 – L.A. Times – Rob Fernas


    WHEN IT COMES TO THE HALL, HE WANTS IT ALL

    JUST INDUCT, BABY.

    Al Davis has made a record eight presentations to inductees at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and he would like to make a few more. The Oakland Raider owner says several former Raiders continue to be overlooked.

    “The only coach who has won two Super Bowls and is not in the Hall of Fame is Tom Flores,” Davis told the San Francisco Chronicle.

    “The only quarterback who has won two Super Bowls and is not in the Hall of Fame is Jim Plunkett….
    …THAT’S IMPOSSIBLE!”

    Furthermore, Davis said, there’s “no question” that punter Ray Guy and wide receiver Cliff Branch also should be inducted.

    Davis, who entered the Hall of Fame in 1992, will be in Canton, Ohio, today for inductions that include former Raider tight end Dave Casper, who will be presented by former Raider coach John Madden.
    =
    =
    =
    Mr. Davis is correct….”THAT’S IMPOSSIBLE”

  25. Sports Fan
    February 26, 2015
    Reply

    Author:

    Football for the Utterly Confused by Tom Flores / Bob O’Connor (2009)
    =
    Coaching Football by Tom Flores / Bob O’Connor (2005)
    =
    Tom Flores’s Tales from the Oakland Raiders: A Collection of the Greatest Stories Ever Told by Tom Flores, Matt Fulks / Jim Plunkett (2003)
    =
    Football: The Violent Chess Match : A Fan’s Guide to Strategy by Tom Flores / Robert O’Connor (1994)
    =
    Youth League Football: Coaching and Playing by Tom Flores / Bob O’Connor (Sep 1993)
    =
    Fire in the Iceman: Autobiography of Tom Flores by Tom Flores / Frank Cooney (1992)

  26. Sports Fan
    February 27, 2015
    Reply

    “…VOTERS DON’T TAKE THE TIME TO FIND OUT THE WHOLE STORY…”

    Historian Mario Longoria one of the foremost Authors on Latino, Hispanic, Mexican, Chicano Athletes

    His work and research can be seen at the Professional Football Hall of Fame, therefore even the Hall of Fame acknowledges his work

    He commented about Coach Tom Flores and Jim Plunkett not being in the Hall of Fame, his comments are extremely important:

    “They’re being lost in the mist of time”

    “By all standards, they should be in the Hall of Fame, but they’re not and the voters don’t take the time to find out the whole story.”

    “They won that first Super Bowl together; a Chicano coach and a Chicano quarterback. You cannot put a value on that as an accomplishment, especially not to Mexicans in the Southwest.”
    =
    The Raiders with Coach Flores and Jim Plunkett went on the win a 2nd Super Bowl

    Historian Mario Longoria’s comments should not be dismissed, minimized, disregarded or overlooked

  27. Sports Fan
    February 28, 2015
    Reply

    Ronald Reagan President of the United States

    Remarks by Telephone With Coach Tom Flores Following Super Bowl XVIII
    January 22, 1984

    The President: Coach Tom Flores?

    Coach Flores: Yes, Mr. President.

    The President: Congratulations. That was a wonderful win tonight. I just think you ought to know, though, that you’ve given me some problems. I have already had a call from Moscow. They think that Marcus Allen is a new secret weapon and they insist that we dismantle it. [Laughter] Now, they’ve given me an idea about that team that I just saw there of yours. If you’d turn them over to us, we’d put them in silos and we wouldn’t have to build the MX missile. [Laughter] But it’s been great. You proved tonight that a good defense can also be a pretty good offense.

    Coach Flores: Well, thank you, Mr. President. I really appreciate it. We played a good game tonight. Our players were just tremendous in every phase. We totally dominated. I think we proved to the whole world that the SILVER AND BLACK is the best team.

    The President: Well, you certainly were from what we saw out there on the field tonight. And, again, my congratulations to you. God bless all of you. And there isn’t anything that I could say that would make you any happier than you all must be.

    Coach Flores: Well, thank you. I wish you were here to enjoy it with us, but I appreciate your call. Thank you very much.

    The President: You bet.
    ==

    Note: The President spoke at 8:30 p.m. from the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House. The conversation with Coach Flores was broadcast live on the CBS network following the Raiders 38 to 9 victory over the Washington Redskins in Tampa, FL.
    =

  28. Sports Fan
    March 1, 2015
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame and HOF Voters and Commenters,
    Feel free to correct any of this

    Written by a HOF Voter trying get this Nominee into the Hall of Fame (names have been left off)

    MUST READ
    =

    “TREMENDOUS ANGER FROM FOOTBALL FANS”

    “PROCESS ITSELF HAS FLAWS”

    “DISCOURAGE POLITICAL VOTE TRADING”

    “MAKES THINGS MORE DIFFICULT FOR THE CANDIDATES AND THE FANS”

    “DISCOURAGE POLITICAL VOTE TRADING INCREASE PUBLIC FAITH IN THE PROCESS”

    The _____ Hall of Fame Campaign

    CHANGING THE PROCESS

    The repeated snubbing of Him has led many to question the voting process.

    It encourages the voters to play politics, it creates logjams among teams and positions, and it creates tremendous anger from football fans.

    The rest of this site is dedicated to working within the process to get Him elected, but we must also consider the fact that the process itself has flaws.

    I can see two changes that could be made:

    Transparency
    The Hall of Fame vote is currently secretive, although many voters freely disclose their own votes, as demonstrated on this site.

    Making the votes public would not change the process significantly, but it would give fans more insight into the process and would help them to understand the difficult decisions that voters face.

    It would let players know how close they are when they get snubbed year after year.

    If the voters feel that confidentiality is necessary to allow them to cast their votes honestly, they could still keep the final vote secret, where each candidate must receiver 80%.

    There is no reason to keep the other parts of the process so secretive, and it only makes things more difficult for the candidates and the fans.

    Expand the Voting Committee
    A lot of power is placed in the hands of a very small group of people on the voting committee.

    It is surprising that a sport with such large rosters has such a small pool of voters for its hall of fame.

    The voting could be expanded to simply include more writers or the Hall of Famers could be given a vote.

    The process could even incorporate a fan vote that counts as a fraction of the outcome.

    Putting the responsibility on a larger group of people would discourage political vote trading and would increase public faith in the process.
    =
    =
    =
    PLAYING POLITICS

    The best way to get Him into the Hall of Fame is to honestly advocate for him based on his credentials.

    Unfortunately, this has not worked for the past seven years, and the reality is that there is more to the process than simply electing the best candidates each year.

    There are a few clearly identifiable phenomenae that affect Hall of Fame voting:

    * First Ballot Hall of Famers receive special scrutiny.

    * Great players like Him will get a boost in their first year of eligibility while more borderline players will get less support in their first year of eligibility

    * The Last Year of Eligibility for a player will usually result in a boost to make up for decades of snubs.

    * Players at the same position can get caught in a logjam that keeps them all out of the Hall.

    – Others at the same position will hurt his chances
    – Logjams at Other Positions will help his chances
    * Players on the same team can get caught in a logjam that keeps them all out of the Hall.
    – Other Teammates will hurt his chances
    – Teammates on Other Teams will help his chances
    =
    *
    =
    The words you just read are from a Website the HOF Voter set up in order to get this Nominee inducted, it is extremely thorough, he tracked how his fellow HOF Voters were voting and kept track of everything written about the Nominee and it all helps shed light why Coach Tom Flores is not in

    His Website Blog allows anyone that would like to comment, which is Excellent!

    Very important is this Nominee that he dedicated the Website to, made it all the way to the “Finalist Stage” — Keep in mind, in 28 years Coach Flores has Never made it passed the very first “Preliminary List/Stage”…!

    MANY OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS COACH TOM FLORES HAS GIVEN TO THE 95 YEAR HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL CANNOT BE QUANTIFIED, NUMBERS ALONE DO NOT TELL THE ENTIRE STORY AND DO NOT DEFINE HIM

  29. Sports Fan
    March 6, 2015
    Reply

    STATE YOUR CASE: TOM FLORES
    =
    Professional Football Hall of Fame stated:

    History: Greatest Comebacks in NFL History

    Many thrilling finishes over the history of the National Football League have proven the adage “it ain’t over til it’s over” is so true.

    Here is a look at the greatest comebacks in NFL history.

    1982: Raiders/Coach Tom Flores – From 24 points behind to win 28-24 over the Chargers
    – Listed by the Hall of Fame among the Greatest Comebacks in NFL History
    =
    =
    =

    #Flores4HOF

    #Flores4Hof

    #flores4hof

    #Flores4PFHOF

  30. Tony Lara
    March 10, 2015
    Reply

    Mr. Borges,
    Thank you for your article on State Your Case: Tom Flores
    It is about time that Mr. Flores is recognized as a NFL person that needs to be inducted in the NFL Hall Of Fame. I agree that Mr. Flores can not be denied for induction into the HOF. Without Mr. Flores’s contributions as a player, coach and general manager in the NFL you do not have a complete history of the NFL.
    He has four Super Bowl rings to his credit two as an assistant coach and two as a head coach. He was the first Hispanic quarterback in the NFL, first Hispanic head coach in the NFL and first Hispanic general manager in the NFL.
    How can anyone claim that the history of the NFL is complete without Tom Flores being inducted into the HOF. He has all the credentials needed to be inducted into the HOF
    It is a shame that he has been ignored by the voters of HOF induction committee.
    Again Thank You for your positive article on State Your Case. Hopefully Tom Flores can get his just do and be voted into the Hall Of Fame very soon.

  31. March 13, 2015
    Reply

    Here is more comments about Coach Tom Flores, by Mike Goodpaster. Click the following link:

    http://sportsrants.com/nfl/2015/02/27/tom-flores-pride-poise/

  32. Sports Fan
    March 14, 2015
    Reply

    Attn: Talk Of Fame, All 46 PFHOF Voters and Commenters


    Please respond to this comment

    The story below written in 2007 has an excellent question that needed to be asked in 2007 and still needs to be asked now

    Because no Pro Football Hall of Fame Voter, or the Pro Football Hall of Fame or the NFL has answered this important question

    In an early post here in this Comments section and also from 2007 – John P. Lopez wrote an excellent story titled
    “On a day of diversity, let’s not forget Flores”,
    his story and the question below both bring up extremely important points that have Not been addressed, they have been ignored

    Simply, both stories, comments, questions need to be addressed

    Also to confirm information Mr. Moore left out:
    1 – AFL Championship Win
    4 – Super Bowl Wins
    1 – Super Bowl Runner-Up
    6 – Games at the Highest Level

    PFHOF officially recognized him among the “First Hispanic Assistant Coaches” & the First to win a Super Bowl
    =
    Here is Mr. Moore’s important questions/comments:




    From 2007 – Run To Win – by Blaine Moore – News, Sports

    WHY DOES TONY DUNGY GET MORE PRESS THAN TOM FLORES?


    One thing that I haven’t understood over the past few weeks is the big issue about how a black head coach was going to win the Super Bowl for the first time. Maybe it is because I am white, but I fail to see how that has any relevance whatsoever. Tony Dungy and Lovie Smith did not get to the Super Bowl because they were black. They got there because they were damn good coaches. It is not as though the Super Bowl has only been won by white head coaches.

    Now that Tony Dungy has won, how come he is getting so much attention?

    Tom Flores has four Super Bowl rings; one as a quarterback, one as an assistant coach, and two as a head coach.

    He was the first minority to win in at least two of the three positions (I am not sure about whether he was the first minority assistant, and I am too lazy to look that up). Obviously I was pretty young for his head coaching wins, and was not alive for his quarterback win. But I have heard very little about his wins. The only reason that I have been hearing his name this week was because he is one of only three people to have a Super Bowl ring as both a player and a coach, now that Tony Dungy has won.

    Are hispanics that much different than black Americans that his wins were not as remarkable as Tony Dungy’s win?

    Has racism become so much worse over the past 26 years that we feel the need to glorify Tony Dungy’s win?

    I am really having a lot of trouble understanding this. I think that Tony Dungy is a great head coach. His teams have always done well, and the teams that he has built have gone on to do great things immediately after he has moved on. I am glad that he has had a chance to be there when one of his teams got to and won the Super Bowl. I think that he will make it into the hall of fame. I just do not think that the color of his skin has anything to do one way or another with his talents as a coach.

    Does this make sense to you?



    #Flores4HOF

    #Flores4Hof

    #flores4hof

    #Flores4PFHOF

    #TomFlores4PFHOF

    #pioneer

  33. Sports Fan
    March 17, 2015
    Reply

    FIRST & ONLY: “HE’S THE HYBRID OF ALL HYBRIDS”

    Professional Football Hall of Fame Vice President and Historian Joe Horrigan said about Tom Flores:

    “Tom was a player, coach and general manager,” Horrigan said. “He’s the hybrid of all hybrids.”
    =
    (To be exact:
    Player,
    Sports Journalist Columnist,
    Assistant Coach,
    Head Coach,
    Front Office,
    General Manager,
    Team President,
    Author,
    Sports Analyst/Commentator
    &
    Champion at the Highest Level)

    He is Absolutely “THE HYBRID OF ALL HYBRIDS”
    =
    *
    =
    #Flores4HOF

    #Flores4Hof

    #flores4hof

    #Flores4PFHOF

    #TomFlores4PFHOF

    #pioneer

    #shouldbeinhalloffame

    #FloresonTOF4HOF

    #HeIsTheHybridOfAllHybrids

    #heisthehybridofallhybrids

  34. Sports Fan
    March 24, 2015
    Reply

    CAN SANGER HELP FLORES GET INDUCTED INTO HALL?
    =
    From March 19, 2015 – By Mike Nemeth – Sanger Herald

    Tom Flores has won many accolades in his storied career as a football quarterback and coach.

    He’s got four Super Bowl rings.

    And perhaps most importantly to his hometown of Sanger, he’s raised hundreds of thousands of dollars through his Tom Flores Youth Foundation and other pursuits for the city. He also frequently tosses the coin before Sanger High School football homecoming games, regularly returning to his Apaches alma mater.

    “It always feels good to come back home,” said Flores during his most recent reported trip at the 10th annual Raider Nation Blood Drive in Sanger on Oct. 23, 2014. “This is my town, this is where I grew up, and there are a lot of great memories here.”

    He’s revered.

    But Flores is not in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    The absence was noted in a Feb. 17 blog post by Ron Borges on talkoffamenetwork.com.

    “Some have claimed a critical question of any Hall of Famer is
    ‘Can you write the history of pro football without him?’” Borges wrote.
    “In the case of Tom Flores you CANNOT, yet he has never come close to Hall-of-Fame consideration.”

    Borges points out that Flores was the fifth leading passer in the American Football League and one of only 20 players to have played the full 10 years of its existence.

    He set a record, passing for 11 touchdowns in a two-game span, that stood for 51 years.

    And he won Super Bowl rings as a player on the Kansas City Chiefs in 1969, as an assistant coach for the Oakland Raiders in 1977 and as a Raiders coach in 1981 and 1983, when the Raiders were unstoppable.

    Flores played as quarterback for the Raiders from 1960 to 1966, becoming the first ever Hispanic starting quarterback in professional football.

    Quite a guy. Since retiring Flores has provided color commentary on TV and radio during games.

    He also got a stadium in Sanger named in his honor.

    So, why isn’t he in the Hall of Fame? Who knows? Why should anyone care?

    Perhaps it’s the final step of a pretty significant career, especially a guy with a lot of firsts under his name, especially for a guy from a little town in the shadow of the Sierra where hardscrabble is a way of life for many of its residents.

    Borges seems to think so.

    A commentary formed under his blog, which was titled “State Your Case: Tom Flores.” Commenter Benny Ortiz writes, “Mexican/Americans are eager to see one of their own excel in sports, especially the NFL.”

    And Fresno State coach Jerry Tarkanian finally got recognized late in his life with his induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of fame in 2013.

    Some want the same to happen with Flores and urge like-minded fans to start a movement to send the ex Raiders coach to football’s Hall of Fame.

    One of those, a guy who calls himself Sports Fan, called me here at the Herald.

    He said the more who join the conversation the merrier.

    So can Sanger raise the stock of its most famous son?

    Sports Fan thinks so.
    =
    =
    =
    =
    =
    #Flores4HOF

    #Flores4Hof

    #flores4hof

    #Flores4PFHOF

    #TomFlores4PFHOF

    #pioneer

    #shouldbeinhalloffame

    #FloresonTOF4HOF

    #tomfloresforhallofhame

    #HeIsTheHybridOfAllHybrids

    #heisthehybridofallhybrids

  35. March 26, 2015
    Reply

    Tom Flores is, along with Mike Ditka, one of only two people to win a Super Bowl as a player, an assistant coach and a head coach. In the 1979 season he became the first minority head coach to win a Super Bowl. Along with being inducted the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2012, we believe he should be considered for the NFL HOF.

    Kevin O’Brien
    Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame (BASHOF)

  36. April 3, 2015
    Reply

    Tom Flores on LeBaron: A big man in NFL, USA history
    By THE SPORTS XCHANGE

    Apr 02, 2015

    While sorting through heights, weights and details of potential future stars in the 2015 NFL Draft, the passing Wednesday of Eddie LeBaron, a hero of historic proportions in the NFL and USA, was a reality check.

    LeBaron was a quarterback at College of Pacific from 1946 to 1949 and led the Tigers to an undefeated season (11-0) as a senior, when he finished sixth in voting for the Heisman Trophy.

    But based on the data used to rate players today he would not be among those considered for the draft. At 5 feet 7 and 168 pounds, he wouldn’t measure up. In reality, draft prospects and even current NFL stars of much larger proportions should aspire to measure up to LeBaron.

    “Eddie was a great American hero on and off the football field,” offered Tom Flores on Thursday from his home in Southern California.

    Like LeBaron, Flores was a quarterback at Pacific and in pro football.

    “Not many people know or remember, but he was only 16 years old when he became a starting quarterback and safety at Pacific,” Flores said. Heck, he punted, too. A 60-minute player who was only 5-foot-7, at most.

    “After college he earned a Purple Heart as a Marine in the Korean War, then played 11 years in the NFL, including the first starting quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys when the Washington Redskins forgot to protect him in the NFL expansion in 1960.”

    Flores’ warm memories of LeBaron are not merely based on being fellow alums at Pacific. It was LeBaron who recommended Flores in 1960 to Eddie Erdelatz, first coach of the Oakland Raiders. Without that recommendation, Flores probably would not have become the Raiders’ first starting quarterback.

    “Eddie was an amazing person,” Flores said. “After playing football, he worked with CBS as an announcer, earned a law degree, was general manager of the Atlanta Falcons. He was a quiet guy, but always doing something, and often it was for somebody else.”

    That is exactly what LeBaron was up to — doing something for somebody else — when he approached me at the Oakland Coliseum in the late 1990s before a Raiders game. He wanted to talk about the Pro Football Hall of Fame because he wanted to set something straight. But it wasn’t about him not being selected.

    “Ray Guy belongs in the Hall of Fame,” LeBaron told me. “I heard something about him not getting in because Sammy Baugh was already in as a quarterback and he had great stats as a punter, too.”

    LeBaron knew Baugh well. In 1952, LeBaron took over for the great Slinging Sammy Baugh, as both quarterback and punter for the Washington Redskins.

    “Look, Sammy was a great, great player, but punting was a far different thing in those days,” LeBaron said. “Sammy had some of his best yards punting on third-down quick kicks when nobody was back to receive. So did I. The ball would roll and slide for 20 extra yards in the mud.

    “But Ray Guy was the best pure punter who ever played. His punts didn’t roll in the mud; they stayed in the air five seconds or more. He was the first and best of a new breed of punters. So you tell that to the selectors, OK?”

    We told LeBaron’s story several times at selection meetings and finally Guy made the Hall of Fame last year.

    As for LeBaron, he was almost overlooked in the 1950 draft, when the Redskins finally took him in the 10th round with the 123rd pick. Before joining the team, LeBaron went to war as a Marine and earned both the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star for acts of heroism on the front lines in Korea.

    Amazingly, when LeBaron joined the Redskins in 1952, he was still only 22 years old. He was selected to the Pro Bowl four times. He retired as a player after making the Pro Bowl in 1962 because a 24-year-old Don Meredith was ready to become the Cowboys’ starting quarterback.

    LeBaron was 85 when he died of natural causes Wednesday in Stockton, Calif. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Doralee, their three sons Wayne, Richard and William, and five grandchildren.

    –Frank Cooney, founder and publisher of The Sports Xchange and NFLDraftScout.com, is in his 50th year covering football and is a selector for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    If you have any feedback or suggestions for our Editorial Team, please contact us at Editorial

  37. April 3, 2015
    Reply

    Tom Flores on LeBaron: A big man in NFL, USA history
    By THE SPORTS XCHANGE
    Apr 02, 2015

    While sorting through heights, weights and details of potential future stars in the 2015 NFL Draft, the passing Wednesday of Eddie LeBaron, a hero of historic proportions in the NFL and USA, was a reality check.

    LeBaron was a quarterback at College of Pacific from 1946 to 1949 and led the Tigers to an undefeated season (11-0) as a senior, when he finished sixth in voting for the Heisman Trophy.

    But based on the data used to rate players today he would not be among those considered for the draft. At 5 feet 7 and 168 pounds, he wouldn’t measure up. In reality, draft prospects and even current NFL stars of much larger proportions should aspire to measure up to LeBaron.

    “Eddie was a great American hero on and off the football field,” offered Tom Flores on Thursday from his home in Southern California.

    Like LeBaron, Flores was a quarterback at Pacific and in pro football.

    “Not many people know or remember, but he was only 16 years old when he became a starting quarterback and safety at Pacific,” Flores said. Heck, he punted, too. A 60-minute player who was only 5-foot-7, at most.
    “After college he earned a Purple Heart as a Marine in the Korean War, then played 11 years in the NFL, including the first starting quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys when the Washington Redskins forgot to protect him in the NFL expansion in 1960.”

    Flores’ warm memories of LeBaron are not merely based on being fellow alums at Pacific. It was LeBaron who recommended Flores in 1960 to Eddie Erdelatz, first coach of the Oakland Raiders. Without that recommendation, Flores probably would not have become the Raiders’ first starting quarterback.
    “Eddie was an amazing person,” Flores said. “After playing football, he worked with CBS as an announcer, earned a law degree, was general manager of the Atlanta Falcons. He was a quiet guy, but always doing something, and often it was for somebody else.”

    That is exactly what LeBaron was up to — doing something for somebody else — when he approached me at the Oakland Coliseum in the late 1990s before a Raiders game. He wanted to talk about the Pro Football Hall of Fame because he wanted to set something straight. But it wasn’t about him not being selected.
    “Ray Guy belongs in the Hall of Fame,” LeBaron told me. “I heard something about him not getting in because Sammy Baugh was already in as a quarterback and he had great stats as a punter, too.”
    LeBaron knew Baugh well. In 1952, LeBaron took over for the great Slinging Sammy Baugh, as both quarterback and punter for the Washington Redskins.

    “Look, Sammy was a great, great player, but punting was a far different thing in those days,” LeBaron said. “Sammy had some of his best yards punting on third-down quick kicks when nobody was back to receive. So did I. The ball would roll and slide for 20 extra yards in the mud.

    “But Ray Guy was the best pure punter who ever played. His punts didn’t roll in the mud; they stayed in the air five seconds or more. He was the first and best of a new breed of punters. So you tell that to the selectors, OK?”

    We told LeBaron’s story several times at selection meetings and finally Guy made the Hall of Fame last year.

    As for LeBaron, he was almost overlooked in the 1950 draft, when the Redskins finally took him in the 10th round with the 123rd pick. Before joining the team, LeBaron went to war as a Marine and earned both the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star for acts of heroism on the front lines in Korea.

    Amazingly, when LeBaron joined the Redskins in 1952, he was still only 22 years old. He was selected to the Pro Bowl four times. He retired as a player after making the Pro Bowl in 1962 because a 24-year-old Don Meredith was ready to become the Cowboys’ starting quarterback.

    LeBaron was 85 when he died of natural causes Wednesday in Stockton, Calif. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Doralee, their three sons Wayne, Richard and William, and five grandchildren.

    –Frank Cooney, founder and publisher of The Sports Xchange and NFLDraftScout.com, is in his 50th year covering football and is a selector for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    If you have any feedback or suggestions for our Editorial Team, please contact us at Editorial

    http://www.covers.com/articles/articles.aspx?theArt=414527#

    • April 5, 2015
      Reply

      Fine piece on one of the NFL’s most interesting quarterbacks. LeBaron proved there is no size that fits in the NFL if you’re good enough….and brave enough!

  38. April 9, 2015
    Reply

    TUNE IN TO A SPECIAL INTERVIEW WITH LEGENDARY QUARTERBACK AND SUPER BOWL WINNING COACH, TOM FLORES!
    Legendary Super Bowl winning coach Tom Flores is a special guest on “The Grueling Truth” Blog Talk Radio show, hosted by Mike Goodpaster, a private coach who helps aspiring football players get to the next level. Mike was co-hosted by Matt Andruscavage for this special interview
    While this is an extensive interview, Coach Flores reveals insights never before about him and his distinguished career. You will truly enjoy this historical and revealing interview.
    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/…/guesttom-flores-legendary-ra…

  39. Sports Fan
    April 14, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges, please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    America’s Game: Tom Flores
    Tom Flores guided the Raiders to two Super Bowl championships
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Americas-Game-Tom-Flores/c3e90a0e-0c6a-46fb-b6da-29089f688865

  40. Sports Fan
    April 15, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Silver and Black Show
    Greg Papa chats with his radio broadcast partner, two-time Super Bowl winning head coach Tom Flores
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Silver-and-Black-Show-Week-14-Segment-3/7c78e12a-5053-4e7c-b425-d1a738f4a483

  41. Sports Fan
    April 15, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Which Raiders Should Be In HOF?
    Raiders Hall of Famers discuss which former members of the Silver and Black should be inducted into the PFHOF
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Which-Raiders-Should-Be-In-HOF/8d21c7fa-521d-4409-a139-2cab56d32738

  42. Sports Fan
    April 17, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Plunkett’s Playbook
    Jim Plunkett tells us about the relationship he enjoyed with his head coach, Tom Flores
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Plunketts-Playbook-Week-11/c894d2c4-47ff-4a87-9709-5f97674ce949

  43. Sports Fan
    April 17, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Flores Inducted into BASHOF
    Raiders Legend Tom Flores was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Flores-Inducted-into-BASHOF/600f2bc8-a6c7-4f56-a798-df296c9b7c21

  44. Sports Fan
    April 17, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR AUDIO CLIP:
    (story is also noted in a comment above in this comment area)

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    89.3 KPCC – By Take Two
    Why aren’t the NFL’s first minority Super Bowl winners in the Hall Of Fame?
    http://www.scpr.org/programs/take-two/2013/10/15/34161/why-aren-t-the-nfl-s-first-minority-super-bowl-win

  45. Sports Fan
    April 21, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    A Run to Remember Segment 2
    The Silver and Black Show presents “A Run to Remember” as we celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Super Bowl XVIII
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/A-Run-to-Remember-Segment-2/46b89ce9-1f47-47c1-8f04-aa01e00ad631

  46. Sports Fan
    April 21, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    A Run to Remember Segment 1
    The Silver and Black Show presents “A Run to Remember” as we celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Super Bowl XVIII
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/A-Run-to-Remember-Segment-1/78c5f293-57a7-4c32-b659-cae3501a7cbe

  47. Sports Fan
    April 21, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    A Run to Remember Segment 3
    The Silver and Black Show presents “A Run to Remember” as we celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Super Bowl XVIII
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/A-Run-to-Remember-Segment-3/7147ca19-89ce-4033-978b-382bb017e86b

  48. Sports Fan
    April 23, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Branch Talks About The Hall of Fame
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Branch-Talks-About-The-Hall-of-Fame/662727a9-a268-4671-bcfe-1336cfb50d04

  49. Sports Fan
    April 23, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Branch Talks About Tom Flores
    http://www.raiders.com/media-vault/videos/Branch-Talks-About-Tom-Flores/0fd5f0e9-7e8d-4d18-81ce-69bc8d99d7ae

  50. Sports Fan
    April 23, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Coach Tom Flores accepting the prestigious Robert Clemente Award for Sports Excellence

  51. May 8, 2015
    Reply

    Acclaimed actress and community activist for Latino affairs, Eva Longoria, appeared on ESPN’s “First Take” program, starring Skip Bayless and Stephen A. Smith and hosted by Cari Champion.
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9dVV_URABMNjRNU01naEp0X3c/view?usp=sharing
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9dVV_URABMSV9JR2VfcTNvTDQ/view?usp=sharing

    Longoria, who has transcended her acting career into running a major production company, was discussing several of her upcoming projects. She spoke primarily about one she was promoting concerning a young Mexican American boy who sang the National Anthem in last years playoffs game between the San Antonio Spurs and the Miami Heat. Unfortunately Twitter went berserk by the posting of some nasty remarks aimed at the young Mariachi singer for singing the anthem in a Mexican Mariachi uniform.
    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/feature/index?page=firsttake

    When asked about some of Longoria’s other projects, she mentioned that in the works is a documentary on Mexican American pro football players Jim Plunkett and Tom Flores. Plunket played in the two super bowls won by the Los Angeles and Oakland Raiders (81 and 85), winning MVP in 81, along with Flores, the first quarterback for the Oakland Raiders, who coached those two super bowl victories, as well as earning two other super bowl rings as a player and assistant coach.

    Raider fans as well as Flores and Plunkett fans were excited to hear this news and looking forward to such a documentary co-produced by ESPN and Eva Longoria.
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9dVV_URABMb0VPMDdzdDlXY00/view?usp=sharing

  52. Sports Fan
    July 26, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    GUYS LIKE US

    https://www.facebook.com/espn30for30/videos/1122082587805168/

    PASS IT ON & READ THE COMMENT SECTION RE: VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    A Raider Revisit: Jim Plunkett & Tom Flores (Mexican/Latino Raider Pride)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_mQPghc2RQ

    PASS IT ON & READ THE COMMENT SECTION RE: VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    ALSO SEE:
    http://coolmath.cf/jim-plunkett-on-tom-flores

    PASS IT ON & SEE THE “RELATED VIDEO” SECTION BELOW THE VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    Ricardo Chavira
    Verified account
    ‏@RicardoAChavira Ricardo Chavira retweeted ESPN Films 30 for 30
    Wow! This made my year!

    ESPN Films 30 for 30 @30for30
    Watch @SportsCenter tonight (6 ET) for @RicardoAChavira’s #Versus film “Guys Like Us” on Jim Plunkett and Tom Flores.
    =
    =
    ESPN Films 30 for 30
    Verified account
    ‏@30for30
    From @RicardoAChavira and producer @EvaLongoria, comes “Guys Like Us” a look at Jim Plunkett and Tom Flores:
    =
    =
    APPLAUSE for Eva Longoria, Juan and Ricardo Chavira on this story

  53. Sports Fan
    July 26, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    GUYS LIKE US

    https://www.facebook.com/espn30for30/videos/1122082587805168/

    PASS IT ON & READ THE COMMENT SECTION RE: VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    Ricardo Chavira
    Verified account
    ‏@RicardoAChavira Ricardo Chavira retweeted ESPN Films 30 for 30
    Wow! This made my year!
    ESPN Films 30 for 30 @30for30
    Watch @SportsCenter tonight (6 ET) for @RicardoAChavira’s #Versus film “Guys Like Us” on Jim Plunkett and Tom Flores.
    =
    =
    ESPN Films 30 for 30
    Verified account
    ‏@30for30
    From @RicardoAChavira and producer @EvaLongoria, comes “Guys Like Us” a look at Jim Plunkett and Tom Flores:
    =
    =
    APPLAUSE for Eva Longoria, Juan and Ricardo Chavira on this story

  54. Sports Fan
    July 26, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    GUYS LIKE US
    =
    A Raider Revisit: Jim Plunkett & Tom Flores (Mexican/Latino Raider Pride)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_mQPghc2RQ

    PASS IT ON & READ THE COMMENT SECTION RE: VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    APPLAUSE for Eva Longoria, Juan and Ricardo Chavira on this story

  55. Sports Fan
    July 26, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    GUYS LIKE US

    A Raider Revisit: Jim Plunkett & Tom Flores (Mexican/Latino Raider Pride)

    ALSO SEE:
    http://coolmath.cf/jim-plunkett-on-tom-flores

    PASS IT ON & SEE THE “RELATED VIDEO” SECTION BELOW THE VIDEO CLIP
    =
    =
    APPLAUSE for Eva Longoria, Juan and Ricardo Chavira on this story

  56. cmj2nc@aol.com
    August 2, 2015
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you


    EXCELLENT AUDIO CLIP – MIGHTY 1090AM

    Dan Sileo’s Intro on Coach Flores “State Your Case” for Professional Football Hall of Fame

    R.I.P. Ken “THE SNAKE” Stabler
    =
    http://www.mighty1090.com/episode/tom-flores-stabler-raiders/

  57. Sports Fan
    August 2, 2015
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you


    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR AUDIO CLIP:

    Dan Sileo’s MIGHTY 1090AM Intro about Coach Flores and Professional Football Hall of Fame

    R.I.P. Kenny “The Snake” Stabler

    http://www.mighty1090.com/episode/tom-flores-stabler-raiders/

  58. Sports Fan
    August 10, 2015
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you
    =

    “New Hall members pitch for others” to be in the PFHOF

    Vic Ketchman packers.com editor’s article added:

    Tim Brown made a pitch for
    Coach Tom Flores
    Ken Stabler
    as well as Kevin Greene

    Regarding Coaches other then Tom Flores

    Charles Haley pitched Coach Jimmy Johnson
    Jerome Bettis pitched Coach Bill Cowher

    I have no problems with Johnson/Cowher I am a Big Fan of both
    but would like to see Coach Tom Flores and Coach Don Coryell get in before them
    because they’ve been waiting longer and just as deserving
    =
    Note: When Ron Wolf was on air with Talk of Fame about Coaches in the PFHOF, he noted Coach Tom Flores as well
    click on link and look for
    Talk Of Fame Show 2-20-15

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/talkoffame321/id969545987

    1:04:10 – (1:05:17) 1:05:31 – (HOF Ron Wolf on Tom Flores)

  59. September 17, 2015
    Reply

    Seven Oakland Raiders nominated for Hall of Fame
    by Chase Ruttig 22h ago
    TWEET SHARE 14 COMMENTS
    The long initial list for the 2016 Pro Football Hall of Fame nominees was announced on Wednesday, and as expected a handful of former Oakland Raiders will be hoping that this is the year that their names will be forever enshrined in Canton.

    In total, seven players who played for the Raiders at one point during their career were amongst the 108 Modern Era nominees for the Class of 2016. Giving the Silver and Black good odds of making it three seasons in a row in which a former Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders player is elected into the Hall of Fame. Ray Guy (2014) and Tim Brown (2015) the most recent players to make it to Canton from the franchise.

    The notable names nominated include Matt Millen, Steve Wisniewski, and Tom Flores while the rest of the list spent the majority of their careers with other teams. Cornerbacks Eric Allen and Albert Lewis retiring with the team after successful stints late in their careers while former Niners running back Roger Craig and tackle Jim Lachey had only brief careers with the Raiders.

    The full list of Raiders nominees is as follows (courtesy of the Pro Football Hall of Fame website):

    Steve Wisniewski
    Matt Millen
    Eric Allen
    Albert Lewis
    Tom Flores
    Roger Craig
    Jim Lachey
    Of the Raiders seven nominees, it is easy to argue that Tom Flores is the most deserving as a coach who was involved with all three of the franchise’s Super Bowl wins and a holder of four Super Bowl rings after winning the 1969 championship with the Kansas City Chiefs as the backup quarterback to the legendary Len Dawson. Flores was an assistant coach for the Raiders first Super Bowl title before winning the team’s final two championships as the first Latino head coach in NFL history to do so.

    In addition to his four Super Bowl rings, Flores was also the first Hispanic starting quarterback which adds to his lengthy contributions to the history of the NFL that have long been ignored by Hall of Fame voters. With notable snubs in Guy and Brown just finally getting in it may just be the year for Flores to get into Canton. Nothing against the likes of Wisniewski, Millen, and company, but when it comes to the Raiders 2016 nominees it is hard to say that Tom Flores is not the most deserving of the bunch.

    It will be interesting to watch the process unfold, but if the four-time Super Bowl winner is not in Canton soon it will be one of the biggest travesties in the Hall of Fame voting. After years of waiting, it is time to get the legendary coach where he rightfully belongs amongst some of the most successful coaches in league history.

  60. Sports Fan
    September 27, 2015
    Reply

    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP:

    Talk Of Fame/Ron Borges, please send this to each PFHOF Voter, thank you

    Tom Flores – Football’s Silent Legend

    link:


    (give video time to load refresh as needed)
    EXCELLENT MUST HEAR VIDEO CLIP

  61. October 20, 2015
    Reply

    Tom Flores: Original Oakland Raiders QB
    Committed To Excellence – On the Road to the Pro Football Hall of Fame
    (Researched, compiled, written, and edited by Mario Longoria, Ph.D.)

    Sports historian Mario Longoria documents Tom Flores’ football history in his book, Athletes Remembered: Mexicano/Latino Professional Football Players, 1929-1970, Chapter “Committed to Excellence: Original Oakland Raiders QB,” in which, Longoria begins with initial insights on Flores’ background and where he met him in Texas. He writes:

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By9dVV_URABMWEY3NFNFVjdWSDg/view

    • October 20, 2015
      Reply

      Don’t have to sell us on Flores. Accomplishments speak for themselves.

  62. October 20, 2015
    Reply

    Thanks Clark, we appreciate your support. I chose to post this article by Mario Longoria because it contained information about Tom we were not privy to before, and thought Tom’s fans (and Hall of Fame voters) would enjoy reading.

    Mil Gracias!
    Joe Ortiz, President
    The Official Tom Flores Fan Club

  63. cmj2nc@aol.com
    November 1, 2015
    Reply

    LINK: A MUST READ

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brent-a-wilkes/lulac-hails-nomination-of_b_8423894.html
    =
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    =
    Please make sure ALL PFHOF Selectors receive this Web Link along with the information in this post.
    And all posts regarding Tom Flores on your Website
    =
    Greetings!

    OUTSTANDING Shows/Website!
    =
    =
    LULAC: 150,000+ – “ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL”
    =
    Coaches Tom Flores & Pete Rodriquez

    =
    #46FORFLORES

    #46FORPETE
    =
    PFHOF/NFL CANNOT the history of the AFL/NFL without Tom Flores
    =
    Thank you….
    PASS IT ON

  64. Sports Fan
    November 1, 2015
    Reply

    LINK: A MUST READ

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brent-a-wilkes/lulac-hails-nomination-of_b_8423894.html
    =
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    =
    Please make sure ALL PFHOF Selectors receive this Web Link along with the information in this post.
    And all posts regarding Tom Flores on your Website
    =
    Greetings!

    OUTSTANDING Shows/Website!
    =

    =
    LULAC: 150,000+ – “ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL”
    =
    Coaches Tom Flores & Pete Rodriquez

    =
    #46FORFLORES

    #46FORPETE
    =
    PFHOF/NFL CANNOT write the history of the AFL/NFL without Tom Flores
    =
    Thank you….
    PASS IT ON

  65. Sports Fan
    November 25, 2015
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    =
    =
    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2016 – 108 Nominees

    25 Semi-Finalists announced

    Only three (3) Head Coaches were among the 25

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Semi-Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off

    Coach Tom Flores

    It is now 29 years and counting, he has to wait until 2017!

    Tom Flores is just as deserving as the three (3) Coaches and has been waiting longer then two (2) of the three (3) Coaches

    An Excellent Coach advised:
    “…Tom Flores should have been Inducted into the PFHOF 20 years ago
    Coach J. Johnson 10 years ago
    Coach Flores has better credentials then the other two (2) Coaches that made the cut
    further
    Coach Flores is just as deserving as some of the Coaches already in the PFHOF…”
    =
    Please know, I truly respect all 46 Voters have no easy task
    But…
    when you look at Tom Flores in his totality
    there is a serious flaw in their voting process
    when again today he has Never been a Semi-Finalist

    Again, by the fact the other three (3) Coaches made it this far 2015 and again for 2016
    so should have Coach Tom Flores

    =

    Tonights 2016 Semi-Finalist Vote was deja vu all over again!

    “…Sent: Fri, Jan 9, 2015

    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2015 – 113 Nominees

    15 Finalists announced

    Only 3 Head Coaches were among the 15

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off:

    Coach Tom Flores…”

  66. Sports Fan
    November 25, 2015
    Reply

    Mr. Al Davis – “Tom Flores isn’t just a great coach in our league. With all due respect, he’s one of the greatest coaches of all time.”

  67. November 25, 2015
    Reply

    The voters of the National Football League’s Hall of Fame have embarrassed themselves again for failing to add Tom Flores, the twice-winning Super Bowl coach of the Oakland and Los Angeles Raiders, to its “finalist” list for 2016. I won’t list his accomplishments to this site, they are displayed on this web site. They include accomplishments that surpass several of the coaches who made the list, all of them deserving induction to the NFL’s Hall of Fame. However, logic alone of Tom Flores achievements and why he keeps being snubbed by the voters boggles the mind. Ask the voters how they can deny Tom Flores of at least making this 2016 finalists’ list. We deserve an explanation!

  68. Sports Fan
    December 25, 2015
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST SEE VIDEO:
    =
    Super Bowl / President of the United States
    =
    https://youtu.be/zVHUJ6i1kBI
    =
    Tom Flores
    Tomas Ramon Flores

    “Published Dec 23, 2015
    Following the Super Bowl one of the perks is speaking with the President of the United States. Tom Flores learned this tradition at the conclusion of his first Super Bowl win as the backup quarterback for Lenny Dawson with the Kansas City Chiefs. He went on to win both as an assistant coach in Super Bowl XI and head coach in Super Bowl XV yet because of extenuating circumstances didn’t speak with President Reagan until he won Super Bowl XVIII in 1983. This was one of the proudest moments in Flores’ life and he tells it best with his Super Story.”

  69. Sports Fan
    December 26, 2015
    Reply

    “Tom I think you certainly established yourself as one of the Great Coaches in the league. Your consistent record of winning over the years, tremendous” – Pete Rozelle
    =
    =
    “Tom Flores isn’t just a Great Coach in our league with all due respect to the Commissioner, he’s one of the greatest coaches of all time” – Al Davis

    =
    MUST SEE VIDEO:

    https://youtu.be/SV6DbL2KCBM

  70. Sports Fan
    January 8, 2016
    Reply

    MUST READ Tom Flores / Jim Plunkett

    ESPN Radio 103.9FM

    The 2 Names That SHOULD Be On HOF Ballot

    Posted: January 8, 2016 at 9:21 am

    This class of Hall Of Fame Finalists is important for fans from an array of teams, but more specifically, for the Oakland Raiders.

    The idea that a player such as Jim Plunkett and a coach such as Tom Flores are not in the Hall of Fame is an embarrassment to the organization as they helped sculpt one of the NFL’s most influential franchises for a decade.

    Plunkett won 2 Super Bowls (XV, XVIII) and Flores owns 4 rings. 1 as a backup QB for the Chiefs, 1 as an assistant coach and 2 as the first Hispanic head coach in the NFL. Not only did he take over the Raiders, a franchise he player for (and earned a ProBowl nod in 1966), which is difficult enough but he did so taking the reigns from John Madden, one of the biggest personalities the NFL has ever seen.

    But Flores was just a football guy, not an oversized personality. In 1980, his first Super Bowl as a head coach, he had to introduce himself in front of the national media as they were unfamiliar with him and his OWN team bus left him at the practice field one day, leaving him to catch a cab to get back to the team hotel.

    Yet his Raiders pummeled the Eagles that year. 3 years later they took out the defending Super Bowl Champs in the Washington Redskins.

    Then there’s Plunkett. 2-time Super Bowl Champ. One of the rare Heisman winners to actually succeed in the NFL. He’s THE ONLY 2-TIME SUPER BOWL WINNING QB NOT IN THE HALL OF FAME.

    It’s disgraceful.

    Worse yet, while Kenny Stabler is a finalist for the 4th time this year, and there seems to be a driving consensus he’s got a solid chance to get in, he passed away in July. It’s heartbreaking to think a great football mind like Tom Flores, who’s 78, might not get to see the day he or his quarterback are honored in the NFL pantheon the way they should be.

    Meanwhile, Tony Dungy is on the ballot as a finalist for the 2nd year? That makes ZERO sense. He’s a GREAT human being. And a good football coach. But his only title came with arguably the greatest QB to ever play the game in Peyton Manning. Yes, he was the youngest assistant coach in NFL history and youngest defensive coordinator as well, he sculpted the Tampa 2, one of the few responses to the Rams “Greatest Show On Turf” and a solution to the West Coast Offense, but a HOFer while Flores is NOT?

    Doesn’t make sense. Dungy is the first African American head coach to win a Super Bowl. Flores is the first Hispanic coach in NFL history and won 2 Super Bowls as a head coach.

    This is an important Hall class as we’ll see if voters will FINALLY begin offering great Raiders the chance to be honored the same way other great players are honored.

    http://fb.me/YaNDfeER

  71. January 8, 2016
    Reply

    DUMBFOUNDED!

  72. Sports Fan
    January 25, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    MUST SEE VIDEO:

    MUST HEAR
    https://twitter.com/FOXDeportes/status/691758981866352640
    =
    =
    #NotACoincidence
    =
    PASS IT ON

  73. Sports Fan
    January 26, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    Some say Tom Flores, first Latino … is overdue for NFL Pro-football Hall of Fame
    =
    http://nbcnews.to/1OVwFh5

  74. Sports Fan
    January 28, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR for ALL 46 Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    Espn’s Marly Rivera / Max Bretos say Tom Flores “Deserves” to be in the ProFootball Hall of Fame – PFHOF
    =
    =
    Listen at
    15:04 mark:

    http://es.pn/1ZTtiwu
    =
    =
    #46FORFLORES

  75. Sports Fan
    January 28, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR & READ
    ==
    Tom Flores PROUD TO SEE ANOTHER HISPANIC COACH IN SUPER BOWL

    http://es.pn/1nq4EXL

  76. Sports Fan
    January 28, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR:

    Two (2) Espn Analysts want to speak each Selector/Voter directly
    =
    =
    “I WANT TO SPEAK DIRECTLY TO THOSE #PFHOF SELECTORS VOTERS”

    MUST HEAR audio 31:38mark HEAR AFTER the interview comments
    =
    es.pn/1PHSNRU

  77. Sports Fan
    January 28, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR:

    Two (2) Espn Analysts want to speak each Selector/Voter directly
    =
    =
    “I WANT TO SPEAK DIRECTLY TO THOSE #PFHOF SELECTORS VOTERS”

    MUST HEAR audio 31:38mark HEAR AFTER the interview comments
    =

    http://es.pn/1PHSNRU

  78. Sports Fan
    February 1, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    Thought you might find this interesting

    Re: Tony Dungy

    I noted when he first won a Super Bowl that he deserved to be in PFHOF

    At last PFHOF 2015 Final Selection: “THEY” the other Voters brought up Tom Flores

    Tony Dungy has been a Finalist three (3) years in a row

    – 2014 – He made the cut from 25 Semi-Finalists to 15 Finalists

    – 2015 – He made the cut from 15 Finalists to next level 10 Finalists

    – 2016 – Thus far he made the cut from Semi-Finalist 25 to Finalist 15

    Keep mind:
    Tom Flores is now going on 29 years & counting has NEVER been a Semi-Finalist

    Tony Dungy in his 1st year of eligibility 2014 made it all the way to the Finalist level

    =

    =

    Kaufman Optimistic Former Bucs Head Coach Dungy Makes The Hall Of Fame 2016

    Ira Kaufman Tampa Tribune media representative that makes the cases for former Bucs

    “I am fairly optimistic about (Tony) Dungy going into San Francisco (site of this year’s Super Bowl and where the Hall of Fame member are announced),” Kaufman said.
    “He made the cut from 15 to 10 last year (2015),
    and the year before (2014), he did not.
    Now he has to make that one more cut (to make), from 10 to five.”

    Despite the records and longevity, Kaufman said there is still one thing that sits uneasy with a few of the voters.

    “The one knock on Dungy is the one Super Bowl (appearance and win),” Kaufman said. “And there are guys with two Super Bowl wins who aren’t in. There are several guys with two Super Bowl wins that can’t get any traction. That came up with the Dungy presentation because THEY SAID, ‘Why are we talking about a guy with one Super Bowl when there is TOM FLORES and Jimmy Johnson.’ “

    http://www.pewterreport.com/kaufman-optimistic-former-bucs-head-coach-dungy-makes-the-hall-of-fame/#respond

    =

    Tony Dungy is deserving but so is Tom Flores, Flores has been waiting longer and will turn 80yrs old in 2017 for PFHOF17 – PFHOF2017

    =
    =
    The Quarterback the most important position on the field

    The Impact of having a 1st Ballot PFHOF QB

    Important Numbers:

    As of #PFHOF2015
    There are 295 PFHOF’s Inducted
    23 are QBs
    11 QBs 1st Ballot P’FHOFs
    =
    Don Coryell 1 – 1st Ballot PFHOF QB
    Tony Dungy 1 – 1st Ballot PFHOF QB
    Jimmy Johnson 2 – 1st Ballot PFHOF QBs

    That accounts for 4 out of 11 1st Ballot PFHOF QBs

    *Tom Flores had Zero (0) PFHOF QBs

  79. Sports Fan
    February 1, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    TOM FLORES SET PATH AS 1ST HISPANIC COACH TO WIN SUPER BOWL

    http://apne.ws/1SlaeIC

    #SB50

  80. Sports Fan
    February 2, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    SUPER BOWL 50 Media Day

    Coach Ron Rivera thoughts on the #PFHOF

    Paul Gutierrez
    ESPN Staff Writer
    Should two-time Super Bowl champion coach Tom Flores be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame?

    “Oh yeah. I think if you coach this game and you have the success that he’s had, he should get that opportunity. He should.” – Panthers coach Ron Rivera, when I asked him about the former Raiders coach, whom he referred to as a “pioneer” in the game.

  81. Sports Fan
    February 2, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF
    =
    Tony Gonzalez was a Chief, but he thinks Tom Flores AND Jim Plunkett belong in the #PFHOF
    #Raiders
    #RaiderNation

    http://bit.ly/1nKn5aC

  82. Sports Fan
    February 6, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF

    Tom Flores: 7 Questions with a Pro Football Legend
    =
    http://nbcnews.to/1K0B4Tq

  83. Sports Fan
    February 8, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF

    EXCELLENT DOCUMENTARY
    =
    http://foxd.tv/FYL-F8

  84. Sports Fan
    February 9, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters – NFL – PFHOF

    “Apparently NFL H.O.F. voters can consider barrier-breaking feats … unless you’re Hispanic”
    =
    LINK:
    http://cbsloc.al/1W2x4Cz
    *

    =
    =

    *
    RE-POST OF A COMMENT LEFT FEBRUARY 2015
    Same author as the link noted above
    MUST READ

    Sports Fan
    February 18, 2015 at 8:37 pm
    From 2007 – John P. Lopez

    On a day of diversity, let’s not forget Flores

    Pack journalism has been at its tightly grouped best for two weeks now, never straying from Miami stories that are certainly nice, intriguing and, of course, worthwhile.

    There’s been the whole Peyton Manning thing. There’s been the sorry NFL pension plan thing.

    There’s been the obligatory no-respect angle for the Chicago Bears.
    =
    And of course Saturday, there was the Hall of Fame quandary — so many candidates, so few slots and so much closed-door politicking from a mere 40 voters.

    This is not to bash my journalistic brethren. Super Bowl week isn’t exactly conducive to originality.


    Overlooking the obvious

    But it is to illustrate that even those at the tops of their crafts can sometimes fail to recognize the irony and injustice staring them in the face.

    More than any other story, the prevailing theme for Super Bowl XLI has been the groundbreaking accomplishment of coaches Tony Dungy and Lovie Smith becoming the first black coaches in the Super Bowl.

    It is a wonderful thing, of course.

    A day has not gone by in the Super Bowl’s buildup when Dungy and Smith have not been asked, often dozens of times, about the standard they have set.

    But groundbreaking?

    Well, yeah. In one respect they are, but the term that has been thrown about so much this week is not altogether right.

    On the other end of the telephone this week, speaking from his home in California, was former Oakland Raiders coach and general manager Tom Flores.

    Some 26 years ago, Flores was the first Hispanic coach to take a team to a Super Bowl.

    In the official NFL Web recap of that 27-10 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles, Flores’ name is not mentioned.

    Flores went on to win another Super Bowl, as well as become the first Hispanic NFL general manager and first Hispanic NFL club president.

    Flores’ starting quarterback in Super Bowl XV was Jim Plunkett, who was the first Hispanic quarterback to play in and win a Super Bowl, throwing for three touchdowns and 261 yards.

    So how many questions did Flores and Plunkett get about their pioneering Super Bowl feat 26 years ago?

    “None,” Flores said. “Not one question that I can remember.

    “I was aware of it and in the (Hispanic) communities I would visit and places I went, it was a big deal. It did not go unnoticed. Hispanics were aware of it.

    “But that’s where it ended. The writers just didn’t ask that question. It wasn’t a story and honestly, at the time I just wanted to worry about coaching football.”


    A degree of hypocrisy

    Today, of course, is a good day to recognize inclusiveness and diversity in sports.

    But it also is a day when the hypocrisy of NFL officials and members of the media practically pulling muscles as they pat themselves on the back over recognizing Dungy and Smith — should be noted as well.

    Dungy and Smith deserve every accolade and compliment they get, but Saturday’s Hall of Fame vote showed just how much the league and those who cover it have not captured the whole picture.

    This year, there was much hand-wringing, lobbying and angst over what was considered a talented and all-too deserving list of Pro Football Hall candidates. Some 17 names made the final ballot for Hall entry.

    But one that did not make the list: Flores.

    If you do not think this is as egregious an omission as ever — discriminatory, really — ask yourself these questions, Hall voters:

    Would you recognize a man who was the first black NFL quarterback?

    What if that man also was the first black to coach a Super Bowl team? The first to win a Super Bowl? Then two? And that same man then became the first black NFL general manager?

    Would you recognize him if he also won more games than Bill Walsh or Jimmy Johnson, and had as many wins (105) and Super Bowl titles as Vince Lombardi?

    Would you recognize him if he accomplished all these things the hard way, growing up the son of a blue-collar man who emigrated to the United States as a 12-year-old?

    Would you be swayed by stories of how he constantly was told that people of his ethnicity could not play quarterback and could not dream of being a coach?

    After college ball, he had to go to the Canadian Football League to prove himself, until a forward-thinking owner named Al Davis found him. Then, he promptly led the league in virtually every quarterbacking category.


    A barrier breaker

    Flores did all of that — an NFL barrier-breaker at virtually every level of the game. Only, he’s not black.

    He is Hispanic. That’s why NFL leadership and those who cover the league should not get full of themselves over celebrating inclusiveness and diversity today.

    They’re still leaving one ethnicity in the trash bin. They’re glossing over the facts, forgetting history and failing to punch the most deserving ticket for Canton, all for the sake of a good story in the here and now.

    “There’s a sense of pride for what I did for Hispanics,” Flores said. “I became more aware of what it meant to Hispanic people as the years have gone by.

    “But I don’t wear it on my lapel. I’m proud of it. But I’d rather be remembered as the first to get to the Super Bowl and win it. Al Davis knew he was hiring a minority, but he didn’t hire me because of that. He hired me because he thought I could win football games, and that’s why it means more.”

    Still, as Flores has felt a sense of pride for Dungy and Smith lately, the rest of the football world should feel obligated to right a longtime wrong.

    “Nobody other than my wife, family and friends made a big deal about it back then,” Flores said. “It wasn’t a story at that time.

    “Nobody ever thought history was being made.”

    Sadly, 26 years later, most still don’t.

  85. Sports Fan
    March 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – Dan Fouts – James Lofton
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters & NFL & PFHOF
    =
    ESPN One Nación Blog
    Tom Flores & Jim Plunkett still outside of the #PFHOF & looking in

    SEE ALL additional links within the story:

    http://espn.go.com/blog/onenacion/post/_/id/2789/flores-and-plunket-still-outside-of-the-pro-football-hall-of-fame-and-looking-in

  86. Sports Fan
    August 8, 2016
    Reply

    TOF
    Please share with all Voters / PFHOF / NFL

    Tom Flores picked to be next Raider
    =
    http://oak.247sports.com/Bolt/Tom-Flores-picked-as-next-eligible-Raider-who-should-be-in-HOF–46646947

  87. Sports Fan
    August 8, 2016
    Reply

    TOF
    Also…..
    Please share with all Voters / PFHOF / NFL

    Tom Flores picked to be next Raider
    =
    http://www.espn.com/blog/oakland-raiders/post/_/id/15101/which-eligible-raider-should-be-enshrined-in-canton-next

  88. Sports Fan
    August 8, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – Dan Fouts – James Lofton
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ for ALL Selectors/Voters & NFL & PFHOF

    Oakland Raiders: Tom Flores Hall of Fame buzz growing
    =
    http://justblogbaby.com/2016/08/08/oakland-raiders-tom-flores-hall-of-fame-buzz-growing/

  89. Sports Fan
    August 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – Dan Fouts – James Lofton
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    =
    Please respond to this Comment
    =

    MUST SEE

    Will Desert resident and NFL pioneer Tom Flores Get Into NFL Hall Of Fame?
    =
    Link:
    http://www.kmir.com/story/32705016/nfl-celebrates-new-hall-of-fame-class-one-local-name-remains-absent

    =
    =
    =
    Also wanted to add to the Audio/Written part of this Excellent information which gets lost from time to time

    Many times in regards to Tom Flores, we hear/read the number two (2), referring to his two (2) Super Bowl Wins as a Head Coach

    Or we hear the number four (4), for Super Bowl Wins as a Player/Assistant Coach/Head Coach:

    Tom Flores is part of Six (6) Games at the Highest Level
    =
    1 – AFL Championship Win – Before the Merger – It was the very last AFL Championship – Player
    4 – Super Bowl Wins – Player(1) / Assistant Coach(1) / Head Coach(2)
    1 – Super Bowl Runner-Up – Contributor
    Equals
    6 – Games at the Highest Level

    As we head into the 97TH Season of the NFL
    He is the FIRST & ONLY….repeat ONLY
    Player / Assistant Coach / Head Coach to be a part of
    Six (6) /Games at the Highest Level in Professional Football
    Five (5) Wins
    One (1) Runner-Up
    =
    =
    =
    MUST READ

    NFL Celebrates New Hall of Fame Class, One Local Name Remains Absent

    By Julie Buehler August 2016

    “The NFL Hall of Fame is STILL missing a key member…
    #Raiders fans… write letters, send tweets, take action……”
    =
    NFL fans thought they had a game to watch Sunday night. But the Hall of Fame Game was canceled due to poor field conditions.

    However, Saturday night in Canton, Ohio fans celebrated a new class in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    In fact, the very place fans sat for Saturday’s ceremonies was deemed too slick and hard to play on.

    So the game was canceled, but for many fans, that hardly diminished the weekend.

    Canton, Ohio is where pro football was born. So every year, fans sojourn to the small town an hour outside of Cleveland to get a look at the game’s history.
    =
    This year, a few men who laid fresh ink in record books were honored, and for good reason. But for some reason, we’re still waiting to hear the name of a very special local man.

    Former Raiders head coach, Tom Flores, is a desert resident and NFL pioneer.

    He won Super Bowls as a player and an assistant coach, then took over the Oakland Raiders in 1979 and in his second year as the head man, led a Wild Card team to a Super Bowl victory. That was the first time that had ever happened.

    In doing so he became the first Hispanic head coach to win a Super Bowl.

    That was in 1980. And he wasn’t done.

    For the 1982 season, the Raiders moved to Los Angeles. All Flores did was follow up with another Super Bowl win the following season.

    In total, Flores has 4 Super Bowl rings.

    He’s the only person in NFL history to win a ring as a player and multiple rings as a head coach.

    In 9 seasons as the Raiders head coach he had only 2 losing records. In contrast, the current Raiders haven’t had a winning record in more than a decade.

    As the Raiders head coach he won more than 60% of his games.

    So why isn’t Flores in the NFL Hall of Fame?

    How can this glaring oversight continue?

    Well the answer may be complicated as the selection process is highly subjective.

    Could it be a generational gap?

    Reality is, there is not a single player on LA’s current team, the Rams, that was even alive when Flores and the Raiders won the only Super Bowl for the city.

    Perhaps it’s the perceived anti-Raider bias the NFL has held onto for years due to long legal battles with former owner, Al Davis.

    But at some point the NFL has to get it right.

    This year, it made strides.

    The first African-American head coach to win a Super Bowl, Tony Dungy, was inducted.

    Hopefully next year, the first Hispanic head coach to win a Super Bowl, the first man to lead an unlikely wild card team to the Lombardi and the only man to find immense success as a player and head coach should be as well.
    =
    And certainly the inductions that included NFL legend Brett Favre, former 49ers owner Eddie DeBartolo Jr, and greats from the Steelers, Colts, Rams and more, were well earned.

    But it’s time the NFL looks at our local resident, coach Tom Flores, and puts him in his rightful place, as a true pioneer in NFL history.

  90. Sports Fan
    August 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 46 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – Dan Fouts – James Lofton
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    =
    Please respond to this Comment
    =

    MUST SEE

    Will Desert resident and NFL pioneer Tom Flores Get Into NFL Hall Of Fame?
    =
    Link:
    https://youtu.be/gkYP97HNLtY
    =
    =
    =
    Also wanted to add to the Audio/Written part of this Excellent information which gets lost from time to time

    Many times in regards to Tom Flores, we hear/read the number two (2), referring to his two (2) Super Bowl Wins as a Head Coach

    Or we hear the number four (4), for Super Bowl Wins as a Player/Assistant Coach/Head Coach:

    Tom Flores is part of Six (6) Games at the Highest Level
    =
    1 – AFL Championship Win – Before the Merger – It was the very last AFL Championship – Player
    4 – Super Bowl Wins – Player(1) / Assistant Coach(1) / Head Coach(2)
    1 – Super Bowl Runner-Up – Contributor
    Equals
    6 – Games at the Highest Level

    As we head into the 97TH Season of the NFL
    He is the FIRST & ONLY….repeat ONLY
    Player / Assistant Coach / Head Coach to be a part of
    Six (6) /Games at the Highest Level in Professional Football
    Five (5) Wins
    One (1) Runner-Up

  91. […] Ron Borges (Talk of Fame Network): State Your Case: Tom Flores […]

  92. Sports Fan
    September 15, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Please re-read every “Comment” & links listed here under this article, as well as other TOF articles:
    Flores on failure to reach Canton: “Confusing and frustrating”
    &
    First woman, first Hispanic talk coaching and trailblazing in NFL
    along with the Comments & links for those articles as well

    =
    “…if you’re telling the history of the purportedly inclusive NFL, can you do it without mentioning Flores?…”

    “…Plus, Flores was 11-5 against Don Coryell, who was a finalist for Hall consideration last year, as a head coach and 6-0 with the Raiders vs. Don Shula, the all-time winningest coach in NFL history…”
    =
    Paul Gutierrez
    ESPN Staff Writer- 4:24 AM PST

    ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Oakland Raiders have had a Pro Football Hall of Famer enshrined in Canton in each of the past four years, from Warren Sapp in 2013 to Ray Guy in 2014 to Tim Brown and Ron Wolf in 2015 to Ken Stabler last month.

    Might Tom Flores make it five years in a row? Should he?

    Flores, who won two Super Bowl championships as the Raiders head coach in the 1980 and 1983 seasons and also has rings as a Raiders assistant in 1976 and a backup quarterback with the Kansas City Chiefs in 1969, was again named as one of 94 Modern-Era nominees for Hall consideration on Wednesday night.

    He leads a list of candidates who wore Silver and Black, along with offensive lineman Steve Wisniewski, running back Roger Craig and defensive backs Eric Allen and Albert Lewis.

    This might be the best shot in years for Flores, who turns 80 in March and is on the Raiders radio broadcast team.

    Flores won a Twitter poll I posted last month in runaway fashion in which I asked which eligible former Raider should be the next to be enshrined in Canton, with Flores receiving 55 percent of the 1,417 votes. Quarterback Jim Plunkett was next with 18 percent of the vote; receiver Cliff Branch had 17 percent and cornerback Lester Hayes had 10 percent.

    Frankly, I was pleasantly surprised by how much support Flores received on social media, and one has to wonder if Tony Dungy being selected this past year awoke many to Flores’ achievements.

    Besides being the first minority head coach to win a Super Bowl, 26 years before Dungy, Flores was also the first professional Latino quarterback when he played with the Raiders in 1960.

    And if you’re telling the history of the purportedly inclusive NFL, can you do it without mentioning Flores?

    Plus, Flores was 11-5 against Don Coryell, who was a finalist for Hall consideration last year, as a head coach and 6-0 with the Raiders vs. Don Shula, the all-time winningest coach in NFL history.

    Then again, the now-48 selectors (Hall of Famer players-turned media members James Lofton, who played one season for Flores with the Raiders, and Dan Fouts, who faced Flores’ teams as a member of the San Diego Chargers, have been added to the selection committee) might suffer from Raiders fatigue when it comes to whittling the list of 94 to 25 semifinalists in November. Perhaps they’re willing to wait for Charles Woodson in 2021.

    Still, of any Raider currently nominated, Flores has the best case. There has been talk of Flores being moved to the contributors category, given that was also a general manager of the Seattle Seahawks. He will not be eligible to be considered by the seniors committee until 2019.

    The Hall fates of Plunkett and Branch are now in the hands of the seniors committee, and Branch’s candidacy was discussed before former Seattle Seahawks safety Kenny Easley was announced as the senior nominee. Former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones are the contributor finalists.


    link:
    http://www.espn.com/blog/afcwest/post/_/id/75893/is-there-a-path-to-canton-for-former-raiders-coach-tom-flores

  93. Sports Fan
    September 16, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST HEAR
    link:
    http://www.kmir.com/story/33109571/full-interview-with-former-raiders-head-coach-tom-flores

  94. Sports Fans
    September 23, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ by Rick Gosselin:
    link:

    http://bit.ly/2d0zoK9

  95. Sports Fans
    September 23, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ by Rick Gosselin:
    link:

    http://www.aldiadallas.com/2016/09/21/razones-por-las-que-el-ex-entrenador-de-los-raiders-tom-flores-no-esta-en-el-salon-de-la-fama-de-la-nfl/

  96. ac
    September 29, 2016
    Reply

    Rick Gosselin,
    You wrote two important articles for Al Dia Dallas in February and in September about Tom Flores. Can you reply back with both versions of what you wrote, but in English? I’d like to read them both in English, thanks

  97. ac
    September 30, 2016
    Reply

    Open Letter of Concern to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Administrators, Voters, The NFL, Sportswriters and the General Public

    I, Dr. Mario Longoria, Navy Vietnam Veteran (1968), Latino Sports Historian, former college football athlete, author of Athletes Remembered: Mexican/Latino Professional Football Players, 1929-1970, project researcher for NFL Films Video, curator for Latino Sports/Military Exhibits, cited in numerous articles and books 1982 – Present (i.e. ESPN, L.A. Times, Miami Herald, Telemundo), editor for NBCUniversal sportswriter, and contributor to the Professional Football Hall of Fame (PFHOF), do hereby express serious concerns about the disrespectful treatment of Persons of Color by established sportswriters associated with the Prestigious Professional Football Hall of Fame selection process. I am particularly concerned about the on-going negative treatment of Mexican American and Hall of Fame nominee Coach Tom Flores.

    In the past, I merely observed the process and proceedings of the Hall of Fame in hopes of witnessing a well-deserved person of color pro football athlete merit the recognition to receive the highest honor of induction into the Hall of Fame. As such, these events are rare and the last such event was in 1998 when Mexican American professional football athlete Anthony Munoz was honored.

    In the last two years, I realized how complicated the HOF nomination and selection process has become. I see many influences, distractions, (possible) back room deals, and allegiances which various sportswriters throughout the years have confirmed this happens. I am also aware that many of the PFHOF voters prefer not to seriously regard HOF nominees from the pre-1990’s glory days because historical research is troublesome or because there is a backlog of these nominees. This concerns me because primary historical information provides a greater range of information and insights that are necessary to properly evaluate a person’s history and contribution to a sport or other venue.

    In 2015, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders’ head Coach Tom Flores was once again nominated for induction into the PFHOF, Canton, Ohio. I observed the process from afar with a sense of enthusiasm and hope that Coach Flores was successful in the voting and advance in the process. However, the process, in my estimation, was dismissed by commentary from noted sportswriters. One in particular is Sports Illustrated writer Peter King, who dating back several years continues to dismiss Coach Tom Flores’ HOF nomination in a manner that in my opinion is disrespectful and does not reflect well upon the process. For example, in 2010 there was a social media exchange between sportswriter John Lopez and Peter King on the topic of Coach Tom Flores’ HOF nomination. Mr. Lopez comments to King, “At some point Peter, Tom Flores HAS to be elected.” King replies, “All due respect, I doubt it.”

    Apparent to me by his response, King’s verbiage “All due respect” only accentuates the phrase “I doubt it” and implies that he possibly speaks for all HOF voters. I ask “What are his reasons to single out Coach Flores’ and his nomination? From this informational exchange I can only surmise that King may not like Flores personally. Therefore to illustrate my point of the apparent dislike of Flores and other Mexican American professional athletes I selected a sampling of tweets sent to King, in which, he summarily and continually discards Tom Flores as well as Jim Plunkett from the HOF discussion and nomination without providing complete information.

    On September 28, 2015 King received a series of tweets regarding HOF candidacy and votes for Tom Flores and Jim Plunkett. The tweets captured a range of inquiries, concerns, and disappointments. For example:
    Bob Dermer tweets “Flores and Plunkett: 2 Super Bowls each. No HOF?
    Eric Beaulieu: “Then it’s time to turn in your voter’s card.”
    Duncan Irschick:”Never understood why Flores not a lock – Coughlin often noted as possible candidate – but Flores has two rings”
    Salvatore Veechio: “But if they were former Steelers, they would be shoe-ins.”
    RO20: “They probably have to pass away first like Stabler SMH.”
    EatMy Jorts: “This is pathetic.”
    Gene Egdorf: “Yet you support Stabler.”
    Carlos Becerra: “T. Flores was a trailblazer for Latinos in the sport and should be recognized by the HOF.”
    CJG: “Come on guys. Moon never won a super bowl but HOF. If they were different race HOF.”
    To these and other tweets, Peter King confidently replied: “I doubt it. Sense no momentum for either. Rest of career doubtful on HoF credentials.”

    There is no doubt in my mind that King’s language underlies a motive or an agenda that may be outside the parameters of the PFHOF established selection process. Whatever the case may be there are serious issues that need to be discussed openly and remedied.

    Also in 2015, there was a situation that did not involve Peter King specifically but rather all the HOF voters. The situation attests to a matter of simple courtesy and professionalism. I refer to a Coach Tom Flores historical brief that was prepared and sent to all 46 HOF voters. The purpose of the 16-page brief was to educate the voters on Flores’ pro football career. The brief contained documented historical information on Flores the pro football Player, Head Coach, General Manager, and Team President. The only information not on the brief is his Front Office and Competition Committee responsibilities. However, there was not a single PFHOF voter (out of 46) who possessed the simple courtesy to acknowledged receipt of the brief. I surmise that possibly PFHOF voters do not accept this information and if they do what are the protocols to acknowledge receipt?

    Early in 2016, the PFHOF voters completed the selection process and announced the names of those to be inducted into the prestigious PFHOF. I congratulate all the inductees but express disappointment that Tom Flores was not among those honored. However, this time around, there is controversy surrounding one of the inductees, in which, claims were made that Tony Dungy is the first person of color to win a Super Bowl Championship; which is not true. I further understand the initial claim was made by the NFL in conjunction with the PFHOF, and aired on the NFL Network, but nonetheless incorrect and continues to be incorrect because on NFL’s YouTube, it still specifies that Tony Dungy is the first person of color to win a Super Bowl. With all these professional entities making such an erroneous claim is indeed an embarrassing historical blunder.

    In this matter, Peter King was questioned about Coach Tony Dungy’s induction into the HOF and, once again questioned about Coach Tom Flores’ nomination, he responded on his Monday Morning Quarterback website. He says:

    I think I said I would answer a question about why Tony Dungy is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Why would a coach with the 22nd most wins, and a 9-10 play-off record, be in the Hall? A few thoughts. His 10.7 wins per season is best in NFL History. His teams made the playoffs a record 10 straight years. He’s the first African-American to coach a Super Bowl winner…

    He continues in his reply to address what the PFHOF asked the voters to consider and states, “I asked the Hall rules maestro Joe Horrigan about whether we should consider the African-American aspect of his candidacy.” But he did not include Horrigan’s response in the text. I wonder if the omission was done on purpose or just an oversight. Nonetheless, I now believe the voters were somehow influenced to exclude Tom Flores as well as Jim Plunkett from HOF consideration. He then proceeds to state, and I paraphrase, that Tony Dungy has influenced many coaches and led them into the profession. After two other similar comments, King finally addresses the question on Tom Flores, he says:

    Now, one other point. Many of you wonder about Tom Flores and his two Super Bowls titles. I answered this quite a few times, but my point on Flores is this: 12 years coached. Six winning seasons. 39th all-time with 95 regular season wins, and 14-34 as a coach away from Oakland…The two Super Bowls are meaningful….But to me, the body of work isn’t there.

    What does Peter King mean by the phrase “The Super Bowls are meaningful?” Why does he not explain what he means by the term “meaningful?” Although, it is a complete sentence it does not complete his thoughts about what he really means. Therefore, I’ll take the opportunity to place the phrase in the proper perspective. This is what can be said instead:

    Tom Flores is the first person of color to coach and win a Super Bowl
    Tom Flores is the first Mexican American to coach and win a Super Bowl
    Tom Flores is the first person of color and Mexican American to coach two Super Bowl Championships.
    Tom Flores is a Super Bowl Champion as a player
    Tom Flores is a Super Bowl Champion as an assistant coach
    Tom Flores is an American Football League (AFL) Champion
    Tom Flores is a Super Bowl Runner-Up Champion as a contributor.
    Tom Flores revived Jim Plunkett’s pro football career and guided his path to two Super Bowl Championships, a Super Bowl MVP and Comeback Player of the Year recognition
    Tom Flores is identified as a minority head coach and becomes a point of reference for racial issues in the NFL pertaining to the lack of African American football head coaches
    Tom Flores is recognized by Marlin Briscoe in his book, The First Black Quarterback: Marlin Briscoe’s Journey to Break the Color Barrier and Start in the NFL. Briscoe and his co-author Bob Schaller devote Chapter 18, titled “Tom Flores Offers Rehab,” to gratefully acknowledge Flores for his intervention and help in his life

    What does this mean? It means Six (6) games at the highest level of professional football competition: Five (5) victories and One (1) Runner-up Championship. Also, in the history of professional football no Player/Assistant coach/Head coach has ever achieved this many wins. Likewise, Coach Tom Flores has also positively influenced and assisted both players and coaches in the profession – past and present.

    My initial observation of Peter King’s written word is too much emphasis on certain and limited information. This could also mean a focused one-dimensional view that does not allow any flexibility. His views represent the rhetorical glass of water that is half full or half empty depending on one’s views or inclinations. Whether or not this is the case for King, he does not respect or accept the totality of Tom Flores’ accomplishments and contributions.

    In my opinion, King should re-examine his views and evaluate Flores like he did Tony Dungy; he should think outside the box and view his historical firsts and contributions in the proper context. Over the last three years, Tony Dungy has been a finalist and I understand that each time Dungy is discussed by the voters the discussion sessions are the longest compared to other nominees. I wonder if Tom Flores’ name ever came up and dare to say it did. But more than likely, pushed aside for reasons I can only speculate are unfair or disrespectful. Interestingly, King has never referred to Tom Flores as a “person of color” like he did with Tony Dungy, and his failure to do so is probably the central problem.

    Who is and who is not a person of color and what does cultural diversity mean? For the record, Tom Flores is a Mexican American and therefore a person of color and a member of the cultural diversity paradigm. Unfortunately, King and possibly other sportswriters do not have a basic understanding of what the phrase “person of color” actually means and what “cultural diversity” includes. First and foremost, it does not only mean “Black.” It also includes Mexican American, Native Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Chinese American, Japanese American, and numerous others ethnicities and nationalities. This apparent ignorance is probably the reason why the Mexican Americans in professional sports and other aspects of American society are ignored, stigmatized, and excluded. In other words – racialized.

    What then can be done to bring serious attention and change to this situation? Can it be turned around? Will the voters do serious research about the nominees, vote independently, and not be led or influenced? Will Tom Flores ever receive the honor of being inducted into the PFHOF? My hopes are he will, but today as in the past, there are no expected guarantees or assurances, especially for Mexican Americans. All I ask is fairness, equality, and respect for all people.

    I close with the question that I understand is a measurement for the HOF voters to consider, “Can the history of professional football be written without the contributions of the nominee – Tom Flores? I emphatically state, it cannot!

    Respectfully,

    Mario Longoria, Ph.D.
    Latino Sports Historian

  98. ac
    September 30, 2016
    Reply

    Rick Gosselin,
    I previoulsly wrote you about the two important articles written for Al Dia Dallas in February and in September that you wrote regarding Tom Flores. Can you reply back with both versions of what you wrote, but in English? I’d like to read them both in English. Both articles are very important, thanks

  99. ac
    October 4, 2016
    Reply

    Rick Gosselin,
    I dont know the protocol here, so I’m submitting this again. I previoulsly wrote you about the two important articles written for Al Dia Dallas in February and in September that you wrote regarding Tom Flores. Can you reply back with both versions of what you wrote, but in English? I’d like to read them both in English. Both articles are very important, thanks

  100. Sports Fan
    October 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    MUST READ
    link:
    George Lopez Lobbies For Jim Plunkett And Tom Flores To Be Enshrined In Pro Football Hall of Fame

    http://www.raiders.com/news/article-1/-George-Lopez-Lobbies-For-Jim-Plunkett-And-Tom-Flores-To-Be-Enshrined-In-Pro-Football-Hall-of-Fame/64280119-769a-4238-b403-11131f85da3f

  101. ac
    October 14, 2016
    Reply

    SECOND LETTER:

    Open Letter of Concern to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Administrators and Voters

    To All Concerned:

    I am a historian at Texas Tech University who specializes in the role of Latinos/as in the story of American sports. I am writing to you today in order to lend my support to the candidacy of Tom Flores for induction into the Hall of Fame.

    I am certain that you have received letters from other individuals who have well-detailed the statistics of Flores’ playing career and his success as a coach with the Oakland Raiders in becoming the first Latino to guide an NFL franchise to victory (twice!) in the Super Bowl. Given that fact, I will not go over these many figures with you yet again.

    What I do want to base my support on, however, if the societal significance of Coach Flores’ success on the field as a player and coach, and as an administrator. My research over the past twenty-plus years has focused on the manner in which Spanish-surnamed individuals, both men and women, have challenged certain “assumptions” that the broader population of our nation has had about us in previous decades (heck, many folks still hold such views). For many years, particularly with Latinos of Mexican descent, the notion had been that they were not really “good enough” to be accepted as full citizens of the US. For many years, particularly here in Texas, such men and women were not given an opportunity to test themselves against whites, both in the classroom and in the fields of athletic competition. I am proud to say that some of my research has contributed to challenging such notions.

    In regard to Coach Flores, here is a man who has achieved the pinnacle of success in his profession, not once, but twice. Does that not count for something? Further, his career is an excellent example to the rest of the Spanish-surnamed populace, a group which the NFL is becoming more and more aware of as paying customers, of what “our people” can accomplish in this sport. I am aware that a similar argument was made in support of the candidacy of Tony Dungy, and that it was imperative that he be inducted given his social significance to African Americans. Is not the same argument equally valid for Flores? I would certainly concur with such a statement.

    I am fully cognizant that certain members of the selection committee have argued that Flores’s record as a coach was “not spectacular” (a total of 97-87). While that may be “true,” it is based principally on the rebuilding job that Flores took on with the Seattle Seahawks in the early 1990s. Further, I would argue, that when the stakes were at their highest, and he had a chance to be the principal player (coach) with a chance to win a Super Bowl, Flores brought home the Lombardi Trophy on two occasions.

    For an individual of minority background to succeed in something that is highly valued by the majority population provides persons of similar background with a sense of the possibilities of this nation. Tom Flores is a shining example of what the “American Dream” is all about. Here, men and women are judged (theoretically) by the content of their character, and their achievements (no matter what the field of endeavor). Here is a man who played the game at the highest level, won titles, and served as the chief executive officer of an NFL franchise. He has made it possible for Latinos/as to dream dreams that might now have been feasible before. Here is a man of humble background who, through his own initiative and skill, achieved what few have done in the AFL and NFL. He is worthy of inclusion based on his achievements, and he is also worthy as an individual whose life and career shines as a beacon to those of us of Latino background who love the game of football.

    Sincerely,

    Jorge Iber, PhD
    Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
    Professor, Department of History
    Texas Tech University

  102. Sports Fan
    October 16, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all selectors to watch

    MUST SEE

    10/21/16:
    3:30pm PST
    4:30pm MST
    5:30pm CST
    6:30pm EST
    on Fox Sports 1 – FS1
    Futuros y Leyendas Tom Flores
    Future Stars & Legends Documentary
    English version

    Pass It On

  103. ac
    October 17, 2016
    Reply

    THIRD LETTER:

    Mr. Joe Horrigan Executive Vice President Pro Football Hall of Fame Canton, Ohio 44708

    Dear Mr. Horrigan:
    I am writing to express my support for former Oakland Raiders coach Tom Flores who has—for an eighth time—been nominated for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Given his historical successes, I strongly believe that induction is an honor Coach Flores deserved much earlier—and most certainly deserves now.
    You have publicly acknowledged the numerous accomplishments and contributions made by Coach Flores; therefore, however redundant my recounting his achievements may seem, it is beyond me why a Latino athlete with many firsts in the history of professional football and who coached his team to two Super Bowl championships has yet to be recognized with induction into the Hall of Fame. In all NFL history, Coach Flores was the first ever to reach Super Bowl champion status as a player and as a coach—his being the first Latino to do so notwithstanding. Until 2007, Coach Flores shared that distinction with only one other football legend … Mike Ditka … who received his Gold Jacket nearly 30 years ago. So, Coach Flores being refused induction or even making the list of finalists seven times—and potentially an eighth—perplexes me.
    Through initiatives such as the Bill Walsh NFL Diversity Coaching Fellowship, the League provides a window through which “talented minority” coaches and players can “observe (and) gain exposure” to programs and camps in the hopes of ultimately landing a position as an NFL coach. But without recognition at the highest level for the accomplishments and contributions made by notable NFL coaches of color, like Tom Flores, that window puts the Hall of Fame beyond reach for up and coming minority coaches—save one, Tony Dungy—and only exists as a scenic view of the seemingly impossible. Why not pull back the curtains and open the window wide enough for coaches from all backgrounds?
    Mr. Horrigan, there is no question that Coach Tom Flores is deserving of the prestigious honor of induction into the Hall. His qualifications and feats are undeniable and have carved a place for him in NFL history. This year, I anticipate that they will also help etch his name alongside fellow game heroes when he is finally—and rightfully—inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    Sincerely,

    Dr. Ricardo Romo
    UTSA – University of Texas at San Antonio
    President

  104. Sports Fan
    October 18, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ

    FROM 2015 – 10/30/2015

    LULAC Hails Nomination of Latinos Into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
    =
    Brent A. Wilkes
    National Executive Director, League of United Latin American Citizens

    In a few days, the National Football League will be voting on nominees for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2016. LULAC is proud to report that this year’s list of nominees includes two Latinos, Thomas Raymond Flores and Pete Rodriguez.

    Football is the quintessential American sport. Regardless of religious affiliations, race, gender or age, football brings people from different backgrounds together to enjoy an afternoon of sport.

    Throughout the National Football League’s 95-year history, only a handful of Latinos have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. Adding two more this year alone would be a remarkable accomplishment.

    Coach Flores was part of six games at the highest level. Specifically, he won four Super Bowls, was a runner-up Super Bowl contributor, and won an American Football League Championship. Coach Flores was also the first and only person to win four Super Bowls as a player, assistant coach and head coach. Coach Flores was also the first Hispanic to start as a professional football quarterback. In addition, he was the first minority general manager in professional football and the first minority team president.

    Pete Rodriguez enjoyed the reputation as one of the top special teams coaches in the National Football League. He was named “Special Teams Coach of the Year in 1992” and “Special Teams Coach of the Decade for the 1990s” by the Dallas Morning News.

    Coach Flores and Pete Rodriguez reflect the ideals that make our country great and by which Latinos across the nation know well — with hard work and commitment, opportunity can be yours. LULAC is proud of their accomplishments and looks forward to their election into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
    =
    =
    =
    November 1, 2015
    LINK: A MUST READ

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brent-a-wilkes/lulac-hails-nomination-of_b_8423894.html
    =
    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network
    =
    Please make sure ALL PFHOF Selectors receive this Web Link along with the information in this post.
    And all posts regarding Tom Flores on your Website
    =
    Greetings!

    OUTSTANDING Shows/Website!
    =

    =
    LULAC: 150,000+ – “ALL FOR ONE, ONE FOR ALL”
    =
    Coaches Tom Flores & Pete Rodriquez
    =
    #46FORFLORES (now #48ForFlores)

    #46FORPETE
    =
    PFHOF/NFL CANNOT write the history of the AFL/NFL without Tom Flores
    =
    Thank you….
    PASS IT ON

  105. Curly Bill
    October 21, 2016
    Reply

    It seriously cheapens the Hall of Fame for Tom Flores not to be a member. One of only 20 men to play in the AFL for all ten years, fifth-leading passer in AFL history, one of only two men (HOF Ditka the other) in NFL history to win Super Bowls as a player, assistant coach, and head coach. TWO SUPER BOWL RINGS as a coach, FOUR TOTAL. And he resurrected the career of Jim Plunkett (who also should be in the Hall).

    If you know anything about Tom Flores you know he was a great man beyond football. He started from poverty, went to college on an ACADEMIC scholarship, and spent a lifetime of excellence in his chosen profession. Away from the gridiron, he has spent an enormous amount of energy supporting educational opportunities for young people.

    I wasn’t even going to mention that he was the first Hispanic-American starting quarterback in professional football, the first Hispanic-American head coach in the NFL, and the only one to win a Super Bowl (he won two) because that shouldn’t matter, especially given all of his other accomplishments, but come on!

    When you add all of this together, it is quite simply blindingly stupid for the so-called HOF not to have included Tom Flores long ago, and it continues to be blindingly stupid for them not to open the doors for him. The fact that it is members of the media who control who gets in is just more proof that most of today’s sports “journalists” don’t really know very much about sports.

  106. Sports Fan
    November 1, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ
    =
    RE: “Todd Haley on Big Ben: ‘As good a QB as anybody I’ve ever seen’ ”

    Great article
    And the info below, to be mentioned along side both Tom Brady and Big Ben is remarkable!

    RECORD STOOD FOR 51+ YEARS:

    “2014 — Pittsburgh’s Ben Roethlisberger throws for six touchdowns for the second consecutive week, setting an NFL mark in a 43-23 win over Baltimore.
    Roethlisberger’s 12 touchdown passes over the last two games breaks
    (RECORD STOOD FOR 51+ YEARS)
    THE MARK OF 11 SET BY TOM FLORES FOR OAKLAND IN 1963
    and matched by New England’s Tom Brady in 2007.”
    =
    http://www.tbo.com/ap/sports/ap-sportlight-ap_sports5ad9172d0f25e48a2145ebb2735cfc84

  107. Sports Fan
    November 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ
    He brings up Excellent points
    =
    “Is this the year ex-Raiders coach Tom Flores earns Hall call?”

    Link:
    http://www.fresnobee.com/sports/nfl/article114445478.html

  108. Sports Fan
    November 13, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST HEAR
    =
    “Ex-Raiders coach Tom Flores on one of his most memorable NFL moments”

    Link:
    http://www.fresnobee.com/sports/nfl/article114380488.html

  109. Sports Fan
    November 16, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ
    ==

    “…PARCHED-AND-DESPERATE…”
    *
    “…INEVITABLY, SOMEONE IS GOING TO WAIT TOO LONG…”
    *
    “…AN ECLECTIC GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WHO MANAGED TO GET THE ATTENTION JUST LONG ENOUGH FOR IMMEDIATE SERVICE…”
    *
    “…FOOTBALL’S HALL OF FAME VOTERS HAVE BEEN BAILING A BOAT FOR DECADES…”
    *
    “…STILL, THERE IS NOT ENOUGH TIME TO GET TO THEM ALL USING THE VOTING PROCESS THAT CURRENTLY EXISTS…”
    *
    “…THE PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME IS IN ITS SIXTH DECADE OF PLAYING CATCHUP…”

    =

    From 2015 – NFL National Lead Writer – By Mike Tanier


    2015 Pro Football Hall of Fame ‘Snubs’ Just Have to Wait Their Turn

    Voting for the Pro Football Hall of Fame is like tending bar at the hottest, busiest nightclub in town.

    Every few minutes, a fresh batch of bold and beautiful patrons bursts through the door. They belly up to the bar before you can finish serving the previous bunch. You pour a few drinks and start a few tabs, then you remember that some folks have been waiting patiently three-deep at the bar for longer than they should. You serve just enough of the parched-and-desperate to give the rest hope, then turn back to the new arrivals just as they start to grow impatient. Just when you feel caught up, whammo! The door opens and the next wave of thirsty customers arrives.

    Inevitably, someone is going to wait too long. His friends and supporters might insist that he is getting snubbed. Snubbed! Marvin Harrison should not be kept waiting. No one puts Kurt Warner in a corner.

    But look around the bar. The staff is in the weeds. The waitress and hostess are trying to get to everyone. You just have to be patient.

    Warner and Harrison did not get snubbed when the Pro Football Hall of Fame Voters met for their annual induction synod on Saturday. John Lynch and Orlando Pace were not victims of some grudge or conspiracy. Voters don’t “have it out” for Tony Dungy and have not categorically rejected the idea of enshrining Morten Andersen.

    With 15 overwhelmingly qualified finalists leaning over the bar, the voters chose to focus mostly on the candidates who have been waiting a while.

    Charles Haley, who has five Super Bowl rings and 100.5 career sacks, has been waiting 11 years for service.

    Tim Brown, Raiders legend, nine-time Pro Bowler, fifth on the all-time reception list, has been waiting his turn for six years.

    Jerome Bettis, eight-time 1,000-yard rusher, former Walter Payton Man of the Year, a player so famous in his prime that your great aunt could probably identify him, has been patient for five years.

    Will Shields, a 12-time Pro Bowl guard, one of the greatest players ever at his position, was forced to wait three years.

    None of them can complain in the presence of Mick Tingelhoff, center for four NFC champions, who never missed a start in 17 seasons and was named first-team All-Pro five times. Tingelhoff has been waiting for a drink for 32 years. The Seniors Committee finally bought him a beer.

    The late Junior Seau, a figure of inspiration on the field and a cautionary tale of health risks the NFL has been far too slow to acknowledge, was the only first-ballot selection. After inducting one player too important to overlook, the committee dealt from the back of the deck. Warner and Pace were forced to wait through their first ballot, Dungy and Harrison their second, Lynch and Andersen their third. The voters had some old business to clear off the agenda.

    It seems ridiculous, almost insulting, to make the likes of Warner and Harrison wait another year, but only if you get caught up in the “first ballot” nonsense that never had much meaning for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    The whole first-ballot Hall of Famer concept was borrowed from baseball, with its Machiavellian enshrinement politics. Those inducted in their first year of eligibility, so the erroneous thinking goes, dwell within some inner circle of the regular Hall of Fame, the best of the best of the best. The concept became ingrained in our minds years ago, after baseball had enshrined its entire backlog of overwhelmingly qualified candidates and before voters declared themselves sacred defenders of some steroid-free religion (which has created an all new backlog of overwhelmingly qualified [but blackballed] candidates).

    Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, a universally acknowledged “obvious” baseball Hall of Famer hit the ballot roughly every year. From Hank Aaron in 1982 through Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken in 2007, it was usually easy to spot the clear-cut legends on the docket. There was a neat succession of inarguable candidates, and because the first Hall of Fame class was elected in 1936 and voters/committees had been generous for decades, there was little unfinished business to tend to.

    “First Ballot Hall of Famer” became a magical title, and then an expectation for the most famous and beloved of baseball’s greats. But no real analogy exists in the NFL. The Pro Football Hall of Fame’s first ballot is reserved for a mix of the insanely hyper-qualified, some special cases like Seau, and an eclectic group of individuals who managed to get the bartenders’ attention just long enough for immediate service.

    Yes, Joe Montana was a first-ballot Hall of Famer. So were Jack Lambert, Eric Dickerson, Dan Marino, Darrell Green, Derrick Brooks and a total of 73 players, including Seau. But there are many, many highly qualified inductees who did not make it on their first ballot: Kellen Winslow, Joe Namath, Bob Griese, Jim Taylor, Mike Webster, Otto Graham, Howie Long, Michael Irvin, Sam Huff, Paul Hornung, Frank Gifford and a raft of recent stars like Michael Strahan and Cris Carter. Warner, Pace and Harrison are in outstanding company.


    All of these players were sure-fire Hall of Famers but not first-ballot Hall of Famers, because the Pro Football Hall of Fame has always been a very busy nightclub. Voters never get a chance to clear out all of those old tabs. Baseball had a 30-year head start in the Hall of Fame business, plus an incredibly active veterans committee that spent the ’60s and ’70s enshrining every old timer with a gaudy batting average and a cool mustache.

    Football’s Hall of Fame voters have been bailing a boat for decades.

    In the late 1980s, when baseball writers were jockeying to get Carl Yastrzemski 95 percent of the vote and the Veterans Committee was making sure the world never forgot Rick Ferrell,
    Pro Football Hall of Fame voters were still cleaning up Lombardi Packers like Hornung (1986) and Willie Wood (1989) while scooping up 1950s legends like Doak Walker (1986) who were not quite great enough to crack the first charter classes. All the while, they still had to make sure they did not fall too far behind on the likes of Terry Bradshaw (1989, first ballot).

    In the last decade, when the Baseball Writers Association of America sometimes took a year off to examine chicken entrails that would separate steroid pariahs from the Truly Deserving,
    the football selection committee was enshrining players in bunches to accommodate Joe Gibbs’ Redskins (Art Monk and first-balloter Darrell Green in 2008; Russ Grimm in 2010) and great defenders on so-so teams of the 1980s (Andre Tippett in 2008, Ricky Jackson and John Randle in 2010) before they got swamped by an incoming wave of 1990s stars.

    While baseball’s Veterans Committee was sheepishly inducting 19th-century catchers and umpires to spackle the holes left by the BBWAA’s inquisition in recent years,
    football’s Seniors Committee has been desperately dusting off deserving 1970s candidates left behind in the rush to induct Steel Curtain Steelers and undefeated Dolphins: Tingelhoff this year, Claude Humphrey last year, Curley Culp in 2013, Chris Hanburger in 2011. The Seniors Committee and general committee have done their best to keep anyone deserving from falling off the back of the ballot.

    Still, there is not enough time to get to them all using the voting process that currently exists.

    There are only 46 individuals on the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee. There is no room for vanity votes, no leaving someone off the ballot and knowing he will still get 92 percent of the vote. Voters cannot check off 15 names and call it a day. They must prioritize and compromise. A voter representing a city with a great team from the last decade, like the voters from St. Louis or Tampa, must lobby for his region’s best candidate and worry about a split ticket (Warner versus Pace, Dungy versus Lynch) or resistance when the representatives from other cities demand their turns. Everyone must carefully compare apples to oranges: quarterbacks to defensive ends, stalwart linemen for 15 years to MVP meteors like Terrell Davis.

    Even when there is no question about a player’s eventual worthiness, there are almost always pressing questions about a bunch of other worthies who were held over from the last ballot, who got stuck behind holdovers from the previous ballot, and so on through the middle of the last century.

    When we do get a first-ballot selection to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, it is often not the type of player you would expect. Offensive linemen are inordinately represented among recent first-ballot selections: Jackie Slater (2001), Larry Allen (2011), Bruce Matthews (2007), Jonathan Ogden (2013), Walter Jones (2014). Pace could not benefit from the trend this year, but like Shields and Willie Roaf (2012), his wait is sure to be short.

    Blockers have often been pushed to the front of the line ahead of the famous men they blocked for. That’s partly because the warts on an offensive lineman’s career are not as easy to spot: Anyone can see the five-year gap in Warner’s career, but offensive linemen exist in a statistics-free environment where a great reputation can reign.

    But offensive linemen also get waved through to Canton because they must be. No one is going to forget about Warner, a media celebrity with a highlight reel that will be replayed for eternity. He will remain atop agendas until the day he is enshrined, probably this time next year or the following. But the voters know that if a lineman slips through those first ballots, like Tingelhoff, he could slip for decades. The ballot is often more about triage than greater-than-greatness.


    Will Tony Gonzalez make it on his first ballot?

    There will still be first-ballot selections to the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Tom Brady, Brett Favre, Peyton Manning and Ray Lewis are all going straight in. But other greats like LaDainian Tomlinson, Randy Moss, Champ Bailey, Brian Urlacher, Brian Dawkins, Ed Reed and perhaps even Tony Gonzalez will have to wait a year or two.

    Sacrilege, you claim?

    Snubbage, you cry?

    Tomlinson and Urlacher will only be waiting for Warner and Harrison, who had to wait for Brown and Haley, who had to wait for Shannon Sharpe, Randle and Richard Dent, who got stuck behind Lynn Swann, James Lofton and Carl Eller. It’s a proud tradition dating back to Otto Graham and Sid Luckman, who had to wait two years because the 1963 charter class had Jim Thorpe and George Halas to worry about.

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame is in its sixth decade of playing catchup.

    Congratulations to Bettis, Brown, Haley, Shields, Tingelhoff, contributors Ron Wolf and Bill Polian, and to the Seau family. Warner, Harrison and many of the rest of this year’s finalists will soon get their turn. There is no reason for them (or their fans) to feel dishonored or shunned.

    They just need to be patient. And stay thirsty.

    =
    =
    =
    Comment re: Mike Tanier’s points:
    Coach Tom Flores has been waiting in this line he described for nearly 30 years….and is Very “thirsty”
    Cue “The Most Interesting Man in the World” Latino voice:
    “I don’t always promote Nominees.
    But when I do,
    I promote Tom Flores … ‘STAY THIRSTY, MY FRIENDS’.”

    – Induct Tom Flores while he is Alive, he’ll be turning 80yrs old for PFHOF 2017 Class

    – Highest Priority must be made to Induct individuals while they are Alive

    – Whenever a person is Inducted and it is a Posthumous Induction, Induct that individual but also a Nominee that is Living

    – i.e. PFHOF 2016 Class – Dick Stanfel & Ken Stabler both deserved Induction but two (2) additional Living Nominees should have also been Inducted as well into the PFHOF 2016 Class

    – A Posthumous Induction will not cause a Living individual to lose the opportunity to be Enshrined as well

    – A Posthumous Induction must be a case by case Delicate Highly Sensitive situation in allowing the Family to receive the Gold Jacket and PFHOF Ring

    – Mike Tanier’s 2015 article “Speaks Volumes” and it is a HUGE EXTREMELY SERIOUS ERROR that Ken Stabler & Dick Stanfel were Inducted Posthumously – Highest Priority must be made to Induct individuals while they are Alive

    – Again, Induct Tom Flores while he is Alive, he’ll be turning 80yrs old for PFHOF 2017 Class – Please do Not do to him what the NFL / PFHOF did to Dick Stanfel & Ken Stabler

    If the NFL, the PFHOF and its voters or anyone would like to add to Mike Tanier’s 2015 article I would like to read it

    If the NFL, the PFHOF and its voters or anyone would like to rebut Mike Tanier’s 2015 article I would like to read it

  110. Sports Fan
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ
    =
    =
    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2017 – 94 Nominees

    26 Semi-Finalists announced

    Only two (2) Head Coaches were among the 26

    I have nothing against the 2 they picked as Semi-Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off

    Coach Tom Flores … again

    How is it that
    the NFL
    the PFHOF
    & its voters allowed a
    “Cultural Diversity Inclusiveness”-“aspect” for the first time to the process in
    2014
    2015
    2016
    but this very same “aspect” was not used for Tom Flores as far back as when he first retired nearly 30 years ago
    And again was not used for Tom Flores
    2014
    2015
    2016
    2017
    ???

    Tom Flores is ALSO a Person Of Color Minority
    The “Cultural Diversity Inclusiveness”-“aspect” used three (3) years in a row between 2014-2016 should also apply to him too

    How come he has not been allowed this same opportunity?

    It is now 30 years and counting, he now has to wait until 2018!

    Tom Flores is just as deserving as the two (2) Coaches selected

    Tom Flores is also just as deserving as other Coaches already in the PFHOF

    An Excellent Coach advised:
    “…Tom Flores should have been Inducted into the PFHOF over 20 years ago
    Coach J. Johnson over 10 years ago
    Coach Flores has better credentials then the two (2) Coaches that made the cut
    further
    Coach Flores is just as deserving as some of the Coaches already in the PFHOF…”
    =
    Please know, I truly respect all 48 Voters have no easy task
    But…
    when you look at Tom Flores in his totality
    there is a serious flaw in the voting process
    when again today he has Never been a Semi-Finalist

    Again, by the fact the other two (2) Coaches made it this far 2015, 2016 and again for 2017
    so should have Coach Tom Flores

    =
    Tonight’s 2017 Semi-Finalist Vote was deja vu all over a
    =
    =
    November 25, 2015 at 3:57 am
    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2016 – 108 Nominees

    25 Semi-Finalists announced

    Only three (3) Head Coaches were among the 25

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Semi-Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off

    Coach Tom Flores

    It is now 29 years and counting, he has to wait until 2017!

    Tom Flores is just as deserving as the three (3) Coaches and has been waiting longer then two (2) of the three (3) Coaches

    An Excellent Coach advised:
    “…Tom Flores should have been Inducted into the PFHOF 20 years ago
    Coach J. Johnson 10 years ago
    Coach Flores has better credentials then the other two (2) Coaches that made the cut
    further
    Coach Flores is just as deserving as some of the Coaches already in the PFHOF…”
    =
    Please know, I truly respect all 46 Voters have no easy task
    But…
    when you look at Tom Flores in his totality
    there is a serious flaw in their voting process
    when again today he has Never been a Semi-Finalist

    Again, by the fact the other three (3) Coaches made it this far 2015 and again for 2016
    so should have Coach Tom Flores

    =
    Tonight’s 2016 Semi-Finalist Vote was deja vu all over again!

    “…Sent: Fri, Jan 9, 2015

    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2015 – 113 Nominees

    15 Finalists announced

    Only 3 Head Coaches were among the 15

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off:

    Coach Tom Flores…”

  111. ac
    November 17, 2016
    Reply

    Rick Gosselin,
    I previoulsly wrote you in Sept and Oct about the two important articles written for Al Dia Dallas in February and in September that you wrote regarding Tom Flores. Can you reply back copy paste with both versions of what you wrote, but in English? I’d like to read them both in English. Both articles are very important, thanks

  112. Sports Fan
    November 19, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ

    “Former Raiders coach Tom Flores has felt the pride of his people
    After winning two Super Bowls in 1980s, Flores and QB were a big deal south of the border”

    Link:
    http://www.mercurynews.com/2016/11/19/former-raiders-coach-tom-flores-has-felt-the-pride-of-his-people/

  113. Sports Fan
    November 19, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ

    “Flores feels great pride with Raiders game south of the border”

    Link:
    http://www.sfchronicle.com/raiders/article/Flores-feels-great-pride-with-Raiders-game-south-10624304.php

  114. Sports Fan
    November 21, 2016
    Reply

    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    PFHOF
    NFL
    Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ

    “Tom Flores, Jim Plunkett blazed path to Raiders popularity in Mexico”

    Link:

    http://www.espn.com/blog/oakland-raiders/post/_/id/16675/tom-flores-jim-plunkett-blazed-path-to-raiders-popularity-in-mexico

  115. Sports Fan
    November 23, 2016
    Reply

    SEE QUESTIONS FROM 11/16/16
    November 16, 2016 at 10:48 pm
    ATTN: 48 PFHOF Selectors/Voters – (Dan Fouts – James Lofton HOF Players)
    The PFHOF
    The NFL
    The Talk Of Fame Sports Network

    Ron Borges
    Rick Gosselin
    Clark Judge
    Please advise all Selectors to read

    MUST READ
    =
    =
    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2017 – 94 Nominees

    26 Semi-Finalists announced

    Only two (2) Head Coaches were among the 26

    I have nothing against the 2 they picked as Semi-Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off

    Coach Tom Flores … AGAIN!?

    How is it that
    the NFL
    the PFHOF
    & its voters allowed a
    “Cultural Diversity Inclusiveness”-“aspect” for the first time to the process in
    2014
    2015
    2016
    but this very same “aspect” was not used for Tom Flores as far back as when he first retired nearly 30 years ago
    And again was not used for Tom Flores
    2014?
    2015?
    2016?
    2017?
    ????

    Tom Flores is ALSO a Person Of Color Minority
    The “Cultural Diversity Inclusiveness”-“aspect” used three (3) years in a row between 2014-2016 should also apply to him too

    How come he has not been allowed this same opportunity?

    It is now 30 years and counting, he now has to wait until 2018!

    Tom Flores is just as deserving as the two (2) Coaches selected

    Tom Flores is also just as deserving as other Coaches already in the PFHOF

    An Excellent Coach advised:
    “…Tom Flores should have been Inducted into the PFHOF over 20 years ago
    Coach J. Johnson over 10 years ago
    Coach Flores has better credentials then the two (2) Coaches that made the cut
    further
    Coach Flores is just as deserving as some of the Coaches already in the PFHOF…”
    =
    Please know, I truly respect all 48 Voters have no easy task
    But…
    when you look at Tom Flores in his totality
    there is a serious flaw in the voting process
    when again today 11/16/16 he has Never been a Semi-Finalist!

    Again, by the fact the other two (2) Coaches made it this far 2015, 2016 and again for 2017
    so should have Coach Tom Flores

    =
    Tonight’s 2017 Semi-Finalist Vote was deja vu all over a
    =
    =
    November 25, 2015 at 3:57 am
    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2016 – 108 Nominees

    25 Semi-Finalists announced

    Only three (3) Head Coaches were among the 25

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Semi-Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off

    Coach Tom Flores

    It is now 29 years and counting, he has to wait until 2017!

    Tom Flores is just as deserving as the three (3) Coaches and has been waiting longer then two (2) of the three (3) Coaches

    An Excellent Coach advised:
    “…Tom Flores should have been Inducted into the PFHOF 20 years ago
    Coach J. Johnson 10 years ago
    Coach Flores has better credentials then the other two (2) Coaches that made the cut
    further
    Coach Flores is just as deserving as some of the Coaches already in the PFHOF…”
    =
    Please know, I truly respect all 46 Voters have no easy task
    But…
    when you look at Tom Flores in his totality
    there is a serious flaw in their voting process
    when again today he has Never been a Semi-Finalist

    Again, by the fact the other three (3) Coaches made it this far 2015 and again for 2016
    so should have Coach Tom Flores

    =
    Tonight’s 2016 Semi-Finalist Vote was deja vu all over again!

    “…Sent: Fri, Jan 9, 2015

    Professional Football Hall of Fame 2015 – 113 Nominees

    15 Finalists announced

    Only 3 Head Coaches were among the 15

    I have nothing against the 3 they picked as Finalists, Great Coaches and very deserving

    But they left off:

    Coach Tom Flores…”

  116. ac
    November 24, 2016
    Reply

    FOURTH LETTER:

    Dear Professional Football Home of Fame Selection Committee:

    The National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS) is in support of the induction of Coach Thomas Raymond Flores into the Professional Football Hall of Fame for his outstanding record. As has been stated “Coach Tom Flores is among the first Latinos and at times the first Latino to serve in any major capacity within professional Football, taking on the roles of Quarterback, Assistant Coach, Front Office, Head Coach, General Manager, Team President and NFL Competition Committee, among other vital roles. Moreover, he is among the first persons of color and at times the first person of color to have taken on the aforementioned leadership roles in professional Football. This places Coach Flores in the status of game-changer for the entire institution. As Jackie Robinson opened doors to professional Baseball for men of color, Coach Tom Flores accomplished numerous ‘Firsts’ for Professional Football.”

    In its forty-four (44) years of existence, NACCS, a nationwide organization of approximately 500 members, has served as a forum promoting communication and exchange of ideas among Chicana and Chicano scholars across all geographical and disciplinary boundaries. NACCS promotes and enhances the opportunities and participation of Chicanas and Chicanos at all levels and positions of institutions of higher learning. NACCS has become an effective advocate for the community-at large in these areas as well. The organization stages an annual national conference, which attracts 800 to 1,500 participants to listen to over eighty-five presenters on a variety of topics that affect the Chicana/Latino community.

    Since its inception in 1972, NACCS has encouraged research, which is critical and reaffirms the political actualization of Chicanas/os and promotes research that directly confronts structures of inequality based on class, race and gender privileges in U.S. society.

    In summary, NACCS reiterates its support of the induction of Coach Thomas Raymond Flores into the Professional Football Hall of Fame for his outstanding record.

    Sincerely,

    Nelia Olivencia, Ph.D.
    Chair
    National Association for Chicana and Chicana Studies

  117. ac
    November 26, 2016
    Reply

    FIFTH LETTER:

    Open Letter to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Administrators, Voters, The NFL, Sportswriters and the General Public

    I am writing to extend my strong support of the nomination of Coach Tom Flores to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    I have been a professor of Sociology and Chicana/o Studies for nearly thirty years at the following universities Arizona State, University of California, Berkeley, and now at San Jose State University (all football schools). I support Coach Flores and his accomplishments because I know the power of organized sports in making a community for my sometimes alienated students.

    I saw my first live college football game while I was a graduate student at UT Austin. I was mesmerized by the power of the crowd and the meaning of the collectivity that I sensed in a university that was not always inclusive of all of its students. Sports is a magnificent way to find school spirit, and collective membership and it makes you feel you are a member especially if you see people who look like you out on the field.

    2014, I had the honor of being chosen as the SJSU Distinguished Service Professor. I was moved and humbled by the recognition – as someone who even with a Ph.D. and as a tenured and accomplished professor still feels at the margins of my institution. I felt I walked on air as I allowed the idea of having been given this award from my colleagues, students, and supporters. I want Coach Flores to feel that same thrill of knowing that his accomplishments on and off the field have a greater and constant impact and value for all who encounter him in any way. He is an icon and a person of dedication to his teams and to his sport, but also to his communities. He deserves this recognition.

    I support the nomination of Coach Tom Flores, not as a huge aficionado of football – but as an educator who supports any all efforts to make community that give people a sense of belonging. I want the Pro Football Hall of Fame to recognize his contributions to the sport and also to all of the players, and all of the fans who have been in any way inspired by him, his dedication, and his contributions. Of course his fellow coaches have also benefitted greatly from his accomplishments.

    As a professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies, I struggle to make people understand the broad ranging implication of omission of anyone in society. I want people to understand that it is imperative that the contributions of racial and ethnic people be embraced as part of the American landscape not as outsiders but as core members of our society. Our United States is a land of many peoples whose multiple communities and cultures are at the core of our strength. Coach Flores is a magnificent example of such a person.

    As part of the Distinguished Service Award, I was asked by the SJSU Quarterback Club to attend a football game and a dinner of the Club off campus. During the dinner, I had the opportunity to listen to coaches and students speak about their sport and about their pride in being Spartans. It made me proud to be part of this community that celebrated the primarily African American players who seek higher education through their sports abilities – and end up making life-long connections and family that enrich their lives in ways they never imagine. And of course, they also experience social mobility through their education and networking opportunities.

    I thought of the wonderful young men of the SJSU Basketball team who used to bounce their basketballs and banter happily as they passed my office on their way to practice when my department was located in the gym at Yoshihiro Uchida Hall. When my office door was open, they would stop and greet me in the most polite manner because they saw me an elder auntie or grandma. Once in a while when I worked late, they would walk me to my car, and I was thankful-I felt I had many children. I have gone to their games on various occasions, not only because of the game, but because of them. They made me their community, and I made them mine.

    I support Coach Flores because he has demonstrated in his career that his players mattered to him, and his fellow coaches have also been affected by his dedication. As in my experience with the basketball and football players at my campus, he has many children – and they want to see him recognized.

    In terms of my qualifications to add these words in support of Coach Flores. I earned a Ph.D. in Sociology at UT Austin (Go Horns) and have taught at universities with strong Football teams all of my career. I have been an educator for nearly 30 years and I have the honor of working with many student athletes in my classes. I know the value of excellent coaches who provide not only sports knowledge, but a way of life that brings honor, camaraderie, and community to their lives.

    I give Coach Tom Flores my very highest support and I encourage the Pro Football Hall of Fame to do likewise.

    Cordially,

    Julia E. Curry Rodríguez, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Mexican American Studies Department

    (also Executive Director of the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies – for identification only)

  118. ac
    November 29, 2016
    Reply

    SIXTH LETTER(Press Release):

    LULAC Hails Nomination of Latinos Into the Pro Football Hall of Fame

    In a few days, the National Football League will be voting on nominees for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2016. LULAC is proud to report that this year’s list of nominees includes two Latinos, Thomas Raymond Flores and Pete Rodriguez.

    Football is the quintessential American sport. Regardless of religious affiliations, race, gender or age, football brings people from different backgrounds together to enjoy an afternoon of sport.

    Throughout the National Football League’s 95-year history, only a handful of Latinos have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. Adding two more this year alone would be a remarkable accomplishment.

    Coach Flores was part of six games at the highest level. Specifically, he won four Super Bowls, was a runner-up Super Bowl contributor, and won an American Football League Championship. Coach Flores was also the first and only person to win four Super Bowls as a player, assistant coach and head coach. Coach Flores was also the first Hispanic to start as a professional football quarterback. In addition, he was the first minority general manager in professional football and the first minority team president.

    Pete Rodriguez enjoyed the reputation as one of the top special teams coaches in the National Football League. He was named “Special Teams Coach of the Year in 1992” and “Special Teams Coach of the Decade for the 1990s” by the Dallas Morning News.

    Coach Flores and Pete Rodriguez reflect the ideals that make our country great and by which Latinos across the nation know well — with hard work and commitment, opportunity can be yours. LULAC is proud of their accomplishments and looks forward to their election into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

    Brent A. Wilkes 
    National Executive Director, League of United Latin American Citizens

  119. ac
    November 30, 2016
    Reply

    SEVENTH LETTER:

    Letter of support for former Head Coach Tom Flores, Oakland/LA Raiders 

    In 2015, Coach Tom Flores was once again nominated for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, in Canton, Ohio, and was NOT selected.

    How can anyone dismiss his noteworthy accomplishments?  Two Super Bowl titles, 12 years as a head coach, six winning seasons, Coach Flores was the FIRST person of color to coach and WIN a Super Bowl.

    It is obvious that writers such as Peter King and some of his comments are not reflective of a person who is culturally proficient and does not consider all of the “added value” Coach Flores brought to the NFL including the conversations dealing with leadership positions & diversity.  Also, the impact he has had on players long after their careers have ended.  The personal counseling, and support he’s provided and individual lives he has improved is also noteworthy.

    Tom Flores should finally receive the honor he has undoubtedly deserved and be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  Anything less is insulting to all Latinos in America, and more importantly, to Coach Tom Flores and his family.

    Dr. Sylvester Perez
    Superintendent

  120. ac
    December 1, 2016
    Reply

    EIGHTH LETTER:

    Open Letter to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Administrators, Voters, The NFL, Sportswriters and the General Public

    The National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS) is in support of the induction of Coach Thomas Raymond Flores into the Professional Football Hall of Fame for his outstanding record.  As has been stated “Coach Tom Flores is among the first Latinos and at times the first Latino to serve in any major capacity within professional Football, taking on the roles of Quarterback, Assistant Coach, Front Office, Head Coach, General Manager, Team President and NFL Competition Committee, among other vital roles.  Moreover, he is among the first persons of color and at times the first person of color to have taken on leadership roles in professional Football, that is, as Quarterback, Assistant Coach, Head Coach, Front Office, General Manager, Team President and NFL Competition Committee, among other vital roles.”   

    As you are aware, Professional Football began its 97th season in 2016.  Tom Flores was part of Six (6) games at the highest level, Five (5) wins and One (1) Runner-Up which included Super Bowls and an AFL Championship that was prior to the AFL/NFL merger and in all those many years No Player/Assistant Coach/Head Coach has as many wins. 

    “This places Coach Flores in the status of game-changer for the entire institution.  As Jackie Robinson opened doors to professional Baseball for men of color, Coach Tom Flores accomplished numerous ‘Firsts’ for Professional Football.”

    In its forty-four (44) years of existence, NACCS, a nationwide organization of approximately 500 members, has served as a forum promoting communication and exchange of ideas among Chicana and Chicano scholars across all geographical and disciplinary boundaries. NACCS promotes and enhances the opportunities and participation of Chicanas and Chicanos at all levels and positions of institutions of higher learning.  NACCS has also become an effective advocate for the community-at large in these areas as well.  The organization stages an annual national conference, which attracts 800 to 1,500 participants to listen to over eighty-five presenters on a variety of topics that affect the Chicana/o community.     

    Since its inception in 1972, NACCS has encouraged research, which is critical and reaffirms the political actualization of Chicanas/os and promotes research that directly confronts structures of inequality based on class, race and gender privileges in U.S. society.  

    In summary, NACCS reiterates its support of the induction of Coach Thomas Raymond Flores into the Professional Football Hall of Fame for his outstanding record.

    Sincerely,

    Nelia Olivencia, Ph.D.
    Past Chair (formerly, Chair Elect and Chair)
    National Association for Chicana and Chicana Studies

  121. ac
    December 4, 2016
    Reply

    Rick Gosselin and Talk of Fame,
    I don’t know the protocol here, so I’m submitting this again. I previously wrote you in September, October, November and December about the two articles you wrote regarding Tom Flores for Al Dia Dallas in February and in September. Could you please reply back and copy paste both original English versions of those two articles? I’d like to read them both in English. Both articles are very important, thanks. Again, I don’t know what the protocol is here please advise? Not sure why after this many requests for your English version of both articles why you have not responded?

  122. Sports Fan
    May 22, 2017
    Reply

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America

    Please reply back via your post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

  123. Sports Fan
    May 24, 2017
    Reply

    May 22, 2017

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America

    Please reply back via your post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

  124. Sports Fan
    May 27, 2017
    Reply

    May 24, 2017
    May 22, 2017

    May 2016

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016, a year ago now, for you all “pull back the curtain on a process…” specifically ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    Here are some:

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America”

    Please reply back via this post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

  125. Sports Fan
    June 5, 2017
    Reply

    May 27, 2017
    May 24, 2017
    May 22, 2017

    May 2016

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016, over a year ago now, for you all to “pull back the curtain on a process…” specifically ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    Here are some:

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America”

    Please reply back via this post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

  126. Sports Fan
    June 19, 2017
    Reply

    June 5, 2017
    May 27, 2017
    May 24, 2017
    May 22, 2017

    May 2016

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016, over a year ago now, for you all to “pull back the curtain on a process…” specifically ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    Here are some:

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America”

    Please reply back via this post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

  127. Sports Fan
    June 24, 2017
    Reply

    June 19, 2017
    June 5, 2017
    May 27, 2017
    May 24, 2017
    May 22, 2017

    May 2016

    Talk Of Fame
    Mr Borges
    Mr Gosselin
    Mr Judge

    RE: “…Here’s the hook: where other programs call their analysts “insiders,” our guys ARE insiders. Because they’re on the “inside,” … These hosts can do what no else has: they pull back the curtain on a process…”

    I’ve respectfully have asked several times since May 2016, over a year ago now, for you all to “pull back the curtain on a process…” specifically ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    Here are some:

    The Pro Football Hall of Fame Bylaws – By-Laws

    By-Laws (III, C):
    “The only criteria for election to the Hall of Fame are a nominee’s achievements and contributions as a player, a coach or a contributor in professional football in the United States of America”

    Please reply back via this post with ALL of the Bylaws – By-Laws

    thank you

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